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106 records – page 1 of 11.

[1st Naval Hospital during the Great Patriotic War].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258696
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2014 May;335(5):52-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
O G Chernikov
V S Chernyi
Iu A Mishin
P A Soshkin
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2014 May;335(5):52-9
Date
May-2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
History, 20th Century
Hospitals, Military - history
Humans
Military Medicine - history
Naval Medicine - history
Russia
World War II
Abstract
In the article about The First Naval Hospital, that became famous during the Great Patriotic War, the authors present the facts of the heroic work of the hospital and its staff under the hardest conditions of the Siege of Leningrad, in an atmosphere of constant shelling, its productive clinical and scientfic work during the war years (1941-1945). As a material for the preparation of this article were used documents of the Military-Medical Museum, factual information about the history of the hospital published in various sources.
PubMed ID
25286564 View in PubMed
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[75 years safeguarding health of warriors of Saints-Petersburg (Leningrad) garrison].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112659
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2013 Mar;334(3):78-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
A N Tsymbal
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2013 Mar;334(3):78-82
Date
Mar-2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - history - methods - organization & administration
Cities
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Hospitals, Military - history - organization & administration
Humans
Military Medicine - history - organization & administration
Military Personnel
Russia
World War II
Abstract
The article is devoted to the anniversary of Consultation-and-diagnostic outpatient hospital of 442nd District military clinical hospital in Saint-Petersburg. This outpatient hospital was founded in on the 20th March 1938. Work of garrison outpatient hospital was especially difficult during the Great Patriotic War. Employees of this hospital heroically fulfilled their duties in conditions of severe blocade winter 1941-1942. The outpatient hospital was nominally garrison, in fact this hospital operated units of Leningrad front-line. In 1993 the garrison outpatient hospital was renamed as 104th Consultation-and-diagnostic. The main branch of activity is health maintenance of participants in the rectification of the consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station and veterans (case follow up) belonging to special risk subunits. Nowadays there are 30 treatment-and-diagnostic departments including staff military physician board.
PubMed ID
23808219 View in PubMed
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[Academy of medical sciences during the Great Patriotic War and first years after war].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258694
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2014 Jun;335(6):73-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
M Sh Knopov
V K Taranukha
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2014 Jun;335(6):73-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - history - organization & administration
Education, Medical, Graduate - history - organization & administration
History, 20th Century
Humans
Military Medicine - education - history
Portraits as Topic
Russia
World War II
Abstract
In the article presented the history of foundation of the Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR and its activities during the World War Two and the early postwar years. According to the authors, the scientific development of many fundamental problems from domestic medicine experience during the war has retained its relevance in solving of the contemporary issues in health and medical science in modern Russia.
PubMed ID
25286578 View in PubMed
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Accounting for the contribution of vitamin B to Canada's WWII effort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138851
Source
J Hist Sociol. 2010;23(4):517-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Robyn Braun
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta.
Source
J Hist Sociol. 2010;23(4):517-41
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - economics - history
Canada - ethnology
Flour - economics - history
Food, Fortified - economics - history
Government Programs - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Public Health - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Vitamin B Complex - history
Vitamin B Deficiency - ethnology - history
World War II
Abstract
Canada began to fortify its flour and bread with vitamin B when it entered the Second World War. The decision was informed by the biology of vitamin B and therefore I suggest that the complexity of this political maneuver can best be understood by considering the specificity of the biochemistry of vitamin B. In this paper I will show that the specific biology of vitamin B allowed the Canadian government the possibility of a healthier population under wartime conditions but also allowed the government a variety of means by which to develop and organize food processing practices to this end.
PubMed ID
21132948 View in PubMed
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Anti-drink driving reform in Britain, c. 1920-80.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143039
Source
Addiction. 2010 Sep;105(9):1538-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Bill Luckin
Author Affiliation
Department of History, University of Bolton, Bolton, UK. billluckin@googlemail.com
Source
Addiction. 2010 Sep;105(9):1538-44
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - metabolism
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Breath Tests
Ethanol - analysis
Female
Great Britain
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Politics
Public Opinion
Public Policy - history
Records as Topic
Scandinavia
Substance Abuse Detection - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
World War II
Abstract
The goal of this report is to provide a framework for understanding and interpreting political, scientific and cultural attitudes towards drink driving in 20th-century Britain. Exploring the inherent conservatism of successive governments, Members of Parliament (MPs) and the public towards the issue during the interwar years, the contribution seeks to explain the shift from legislative paralysis to the introduction of the breathalyser in 1967.
Based on governmental, parliamentary and administrative records, the report follows a mainly narrative route. It places particular emphasis on connections between post-war extra-parliamentary and parliamentary movements for reform.
The paper follows a linear path from the 1920s to the 1970s. Britain lies at the heart of the story but comparisons are made with nations--particularly the Scandinavian states--which took radical steps to prosecute drinking and dangerous drivers at an early date.
The report underlines the vital post-war role played by Graham Page, leading parliamentary spokesman for the Pedestrians' Association; the centrality of the Drew Report (1959) into an 'activity resembling driving'; the pioneering Conservative efforts of Ernest Marples; and Barbara Castle's consolidating rather than radically innovative activities between 1964 and 1967.
Both before and after the Second World War politicians from both major parties gave ground repeatedly to major motoring organizations. With the ever-escalating growth of mass motorization in the 1950s, both Conservative and Labour governments agonized over gridlock and 'murder on the roads'. Barbara Castle finally took decisive action against drink drivers, but the ground had been prepared by Graham Page and Ernest Marples.
PubMed ID
20528813 View in PubMed
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Source
Sci Am. 2010 May;302(5):66-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Matthew Sturm
Author Affiliation
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, USA.
Source
Sci Am. 2010 May;302(5):66-73
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Fires
Global warming
Ice Cover
Photography
Plants - growth & development
Spacecraft
Trees - growth & development
World War II
PubMed ID
20443380 View in PubMed
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Associations Between Self-Reported and Objectively Recorded Early Life Stress, FKBP5 Polymorphisms, and Depressive Symptoms in Midlife.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284243
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Dec 01;80(11):869-877
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Jari Lahti
Heidi Ala-Mikkula
Eero Kajantie
Kadri Haljas
Johan G Eriksson
Katri Räikkönen
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Dec 01;80(11):869-877
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Depression - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Self Report
Stress, Psychological
Tacrolimus Binding Proteins - genetics
World War II
Abstract
FK506-binding protein 51 is involved in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FKBP5 gene have been shown to interact with retrospectively self-reported early life stress (ELS) in patients with psychiatric disorders. We examined interactions between three selected FKBP5 SNPs and self-reported and objectively recorded ELS in relation to depressive symptoms in midlife.
This study comprised 1431 Helsinki Birth Cohort Study participants genotyped for FKBP5 SNPs shown to alter cortisol metabolism (rs1360780, rs9470080, and rs9394309). Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at ages 61.5 years (time 1) and 63.4 years (time 2); 165 and 181 participants were separated from their parents in childhood as a result of evacuations during World War II as indicated by self-reports and the Finnish National Archives registry, respectively.
Associations between self-reported and objectively recorded ELS, but not stressful events in midlife, and the mean BDI score (average of time 1 and time 2) or mild to severe BDI scores (10-63 points at time 1 and time 2), or both, were moderated by the FKBP5 variants (p values for interactions .18). Mean BDI scores or odds for having mild to severe BDI scores, or both, increased according to number of minor alleles and haplotypes derived from these alleles in the separated groups, but not in the nonseparated groups.
FKBP5 variations in combination with self-reported and objectively recorded ELS predict more pronounced depressive symptoms in midlife. Our findings confirm previous retrospective findings in a prospective epidemiologic study setting.
PubMed ID
26740367 View in PubMed
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Augusta Rasmussen - psychiatrist, pioneer and the scientific truths of the time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296860
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 06 26; 138(11):
Publication Type
Biography
Historical Article
Journal Article
Portrait
Date
06-26-2018
Author
Erlend Hem
Per E Børdahl
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 06 26; 138(11):
Date
06-26-2018
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Biography
Historical Article
Journal Article
Portrait
Keywords
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Crime Victims - history - psychology
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Intellectual Disability - history
National Socialism - history
Norway
Psychiatry - history
Women's Health - history
World War II
Abstract
In 1934, senior registrar Augusta Rasmussen (1895–1979) published a study of 77 cases involving sexual offences. She found that the women involved had suffered no mental injury from the abuse. In 1947, she published a study of the intelligence level of 310 Norwegian women who had formed relationships with German soldiers during the occupation. She found that nearly all of them were more or less retarded. Her conclusions, however, were not scientifically valid. Here we present Rasmussen’s biography, academic background and scientific activity.
PubMed ID
29947204 View in PubMed
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106 records – page 1 of 11.