Skip header and navigation

Refine By

829 records – page 1 of 83.

[10-year dynamics of attitude to health problems in the male population of Novosibirsk (epidemiological study based on the WHO MONICA program)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74937
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(1):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
V V Gafarov
V A Pak
I V Gagulin
T D Babina
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(1):27-30
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Siberia - epidemiology
World Health Organization
Abstract
AIM: To evaluate changes for a decade in the attitude of men in Novosibirsk to health problems. MATERIAL AND METHODS: WHO program MONICA has covered males aged 25-64 years (a representative sample from the population in one of the districts of Novosibirsk city). A total of 3 trials were made (in 1984, 1988 and 1994) which included questioning, registration of ECG, arterial pressure, height, body mass, biochemical tests of the blood. RESULTS: Attitude of men to their health depended on their age. There was a trend to evaluate their health as more and more poor in men at the age of 25-43 and 35-44 years. In the group of 45-54-year-olds positive assessment of health was encountered 1.9 times more frequently, but the difference was not significant. At the age 55-64 years a growing number of men tend to assess their health as good. Since 1994 alcoholics among the elderly men grew in number as a response to the social and economic crisis. CONCLUSION: The change in health evaluation from negative to positive in older men may relate to less intensive work.
PubMed ID
12652951 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2010 WHO classification of digestive neuroendocrine neoplasms: a critical appraisal four years after its introduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260854
Source
Endocr Pathol. 2014 Jun;25(2):186-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
G. Rindi
G. Petrone
F. Inzani
Source
Endocr Pathol. 2014 Jun;25(2):186-92
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Digestive System Neoplasms - classification
Humans
Neoplasm Grading - standards
Neoplasm Staging - standards
Neuroendocrine Tumors - classification
World Health Organization
Abstract
This paper briefly illustrates the basis, rules of application, and present outcome of the current World Health Organization (WHO) classification for neuroendocrine neoplasms. Established in 2010 upon the proposal from the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS), the WHO 2010 fostered some definitional changes (most notably the use of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) instead of carcinoid) and indicated the tools of grading and staging. Specific rules for its application were also defined. The data generated from the use of WHO 2010 classification substantially endorsed its rules and prognostic efficacy. In addition, the application demonstrated some issues, among which are the possible re-definition of the cutoff for grading G1 vs G2, as well as the possible identification of cases with somewhat different clinical behavior within the G3 neuroendocrine cancer class. Overall, since the recent introduction of WHO 2010 grading and staging, it appears wise to keep the current descriptors to avoid unnecessary confusion and to generate comparable data. Homogenous data on large series are ultimately needed to solve such issues.
PubMed ID
24699927 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Actual problems of vaccine prophylaxis in the Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104494
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2014 Jan-Feb;(1):9-19
Publication Type
Article
Author
G G Onishchenko
E B Ezhlova
A A Mel'nikova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2014 Jan-Feb;(1):9-19
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Infections - mortality - prevention & control
Communicable Disease Control - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Russia - epidemiology
Vaccines - standards - therapeutic use
Virus Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
World Health Organization
Abstract
The WHO within the framework of extended immunization program assumes a significant increase of the number of vaccine controlled infections by 2020 - 2025 to 27 - 37 including protection from diseases of parasitic etiology. Russia contributes to the international efforts of the WHO to control infections with vaccine prophylaxis. The national calendar of prophylaxis vaccinations currently provides vaccination against 11 infections--tuberculosis, hepatitis B, poliomyelitis, pertussis, diphtheria, tetanus, measles, rubella, epidemic parotitis, influenza, haemophilus type B infection. Significant progress in reduction of infectious morbidity controlled by means of specific prophylaxis has been made in the country.
PubMed ID
24738288 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Finland--baseline data from the FINMONICA AMI register in 1983-1985.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223821
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 May;13(5):577-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
J. Tuomilehto
M. Arstila
E. Kaarsalo
J. Kankaanpää
M. Ketonen
K. Kuulasmaa
S. Lehto
H. Miettinen
H. Mustaniemi
P. Palomäki
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 May;13(5):577-87
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Data Collection - methods - standards
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
International Cooperation
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Registries - standards - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Space-Time Clustering
Time Factors
World Health Organization
Abstract
The acute myocardial infarction (AMI) register of the FINMONICA study, the Finnish part of the WHO-coordinated multinational MONICA project, operates in the provinces of North Karelia and Kuopio in eastern Finland and in Turku, Loimaa and in communities around Loimaa in southwestern Finland. The AMI register serves as an instrument for the assessment of trends in mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) and of the incidence and attack rates of AMI among 25-64-year-old residents of the study areas. This report describes the methods used in the FINMONICA AMI register and the findings during the first 3 years of the study, in 1983-1985. The criteria of the multinational WHO MONICA project were used in the classification of fatal events and in the diagnosis of non-fatal definite AMI, but based on the experience within the FINMONICA study, stricter diagnostic criteria than those originally described in the WHO MONICA protocol were used for non-fatal possible AMI. This led to a marked improvement in the comparability of the data from the three study areas with regard to the incidence and attack rates of non-fatal AMI. During the 3-year period the total number of registered events was 6266 among men and 2092 among women. Among men the incidence and attack rates of AMI and mortality from CHD were higher in eastern than in southwestern Finland. Also among women the incidence and attack rates of AMI were higher in eastern than in southwestern Finland, whereas there was no regional difference in mortality from CHD among women. The mortality findings of the FINMONICA AMI Register were in good agreement with the official CHD mortality statistics of Finland.
Notes
Erratum In: Eur Heart J 1992 Aug;13(8):1153
PubMed ID
1618197 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 1998 Jan;8 Suppl 1:6-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
M G Hennerici
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Deutschland. Hennerici@neuropc1.neuroma.uni-heidelberg.de
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 1998 Jan;8 Suppl 1:6-8
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Cerebrovascular Disorders - therapy
Europe
Humans
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
World Health Organization
PubMed ID
9547028 View in PubMed
Less detail

829 records – page 1 of 83.