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1444 records – page 1 of 145.

4th European Public Health Conference 2011 in Copenhagen: Public Health and Welfare--Welfare Development and Health .

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137620
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Feb;39(1):1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Finn Kamper-Jørgensen
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Feb;39(1):1-2
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Europe
Health promotion
Humans
Public Health
World Health
PubMed ID
21266586 View in PubMed
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[10-year dynamics of attitude to health problems in the male population of Novosibirsk (epidemiological study based on the WHO MONICA program)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74937
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(1):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
V V Gafarov
V A Pak
I V Gagulin
T D Babina
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(1):27-30
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Siberia - epidemiology
World Health Organization
Abstract
AIM: To evaluate changes for a decade in the attitude of men in Novosibirsk to health problems. MATERIAL AND METHODS: WHO program MONICA has covered males aged 25-64 years (a representative sample from the population in one of the districts of Novosibirsk city). A total of 3 trials were made (in 1984, 1988 and 1994) which included questioning, registration of ECG, arterial pressure, height, body mass, biochemical tests of the blood. RESULTS: Attitude of men to their health depended on their age. There was a trend to evaluate their health as more and more poor in men at the age of 25-43 and 35-44 years. In the group of 45-54-year-olds positive assessment of health was encountered 1.9 times more frequently, but the difference was not significant. At the age 55-64 years a growing number of men tend to assess their health as good. Since 1994 alcoholics among the elderly men grew in number as a response to the social and economic crisis. CONCLUSION: The change in health evaluation from negative to positive in older men may relate to less intensive work.
PubMed ID
12652951 View in PubMed
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The 16th International Conference on AIDS: will it leave a legacy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160673
Source
MedGenMed. 2007;9(2):15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007

The 2010 WHO classification of digestive neuroendocrine neoplasms: a critical appraisal four years after its introduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260854
Source
Endocr Pathol. 2014 Jun;25(2):186-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
G. Rindi
G. Petrone
F. Inzani
Source
Endocr Pathol. 2014 Jun;25(2):186-92
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Digestive System Neoplasms - classification
Humans
Neoplasm Grading - standards
Neoplasm Staging - standards
Neuroendocrine Tumors - classification
World Health Organization
Abstract
This paper briefly illustrates the basis, rules of application, and present outcome of the current World Health Organization (WHO) classification for neuroendocrine neoplasms. Established in 2010 upon the proposal from the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS), the WHO 2010 fostered some definitional changes (most notably the use of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) instead of carcinoid) and indicated the tools of grading and staging. Specific rules for its application were also defined. The data generated from the use of WHO 2010 classification substantially endorsed its rules and prognostic efficacy. In addition, the application demonstrated some issues, among which are the possible re-definition of the cutoff for grading G1 vs G2, as well as the possible identification of cases with somewhat different clinical behavior within the G3 neuroendocrine cancer class. Overall, since the recent introduction of WHO 2010 grading and staging, it appears wise to keep the current descriptors to avoid unnecessary confusion and to generate comparable data. Homogenous data on large series are ultimately needed to solve such issues.
PubMed ID
24699927 View in PubMed
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Access and authorisation in a Glocal e-Health Policy context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180735
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2004 Mar 31;73(3):259-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2004
Author
Richard E Scott
Penny Jennett
Maryann Yeo
Author Affiliation
Global e-Health Research and Training Program, G204 Health Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1. rescott@ucalgary.ca
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2004 Mar 31;73(3):259-66
Date
Mar-31-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Canada
Computer Security
Health Policy
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - organization & administration - standards
Security Measures
World Health
Abstract
Challenges to the development of appropriate yet adaptable policy and tools for security of the individual patient electronic health record (EHR) are proving to be significant. Compounding this is the unique capability of e-health to transgress all existing geo-political and other barriers. Initiatives to develop and advance policy, standards, and tools in relation to EHR access control and authorisation management must address this capability. Currently policy development initiatives take place largely in an isolated manner. This jeopardises the potential of e-health because decisions made in one jurisdiction might hamper, even prevent, an e-health opportunity in another. This paper places access and authorisation issues in an overall policy context through describing current Canadian initiatives. The National Initiative for Telehealth (NIFTE) Guidelines project is developing a framework of national guidelines for telehealth. The Policy and Peer Permission (PPP) project is developing a unique tool that provides persistent protection of data. The new corporate body 'Infoway' is developing a pan-Canadian electronic health record solution. Finally, the Glocal e-Health Policy initiative is developing a tool with which to identify and describe the inter-relationships of e-health issues amongst policy levels, themes, and actors.
PubMed ID
15066556 View in PubMed
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Accessing timely rehabilitation services for a global aging society? Exploring the realities within Canada's universal health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145394
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Michel D Landry
Sudha Raman
Elham Al-Hamdan
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mike.landry@utoronto.ca
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Objectives
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Private Sector - organization & administration
Public Sector - organization & administration
Time Factors
World Health
Abstract
The proportion of older persons is increasing in developed and developing countries: this aging trend can be viewed as a two-edged sword. On the one hand, it represents remarkable successes regarding advances in health care; and on the other hand, it represents a considerable challenge for health systems to meet growing demand. A growing disequilibrium between supply and demand may be particularly challenging within publicly funding health systems that 'guarantee' services to eligible populations. Rehabilitation, including physical therapy, is a service that if provided in a timely manner, can maximize function and mobility for older persons, which may in turn optimize efficiency and effectiveness of overall health care systems. However, physical therapy services are not considered an insured service under the legislative framework of the Canadian health system, and as such, a complex public/private mix of funding and delivery has emerged. In this article, we explore the consequences of a public/private mix of physical therapy on timely access to services, and use the World Health Organization (WHO) health system performance framework to assess the extent to which the emerging system influences the goal of aggregated and equitable health. Overall, we argue that a shift to a public/private mix may not have positive influences at the population level, and that innovative approaches to deliver services would be desirable to strengthening rather than weaken the publicly funded system. We signal that strategies aimed at scaling up rehabilitation interventions are required in order to improve health outcomes in an evolving global aging society.
PubMed ID
20158495 View in PubMed
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Access to medicines and global health: will Canada lead or flounder?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181912
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Jan 20;170(2):224-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-2004
Author
James Orbinski
Author Affiliation
St. Michael's Hospital, Centre for International Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. james.orbinski@utoronto.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Jan 20;170(2):224-6
Date
Jan-20-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Drug Costs
Drug Industry - organization & administration
Drugs, Essential - supply & distribution
Forecasting
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
National health programs - organization & administration
Needs Assessment
Patents as Topic
World Health
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2004 Apr 27;170(9):1374; author reply 1374-515111456
PubMed ID
14734437 View in PubMed
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1444 records – page 1 of 145.