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A 35-year follow-up study on burnout among Finnish employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133208
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2011 Jul;16(3):345-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Jari J Hakanen
Arnold B Bakker
Markku Jokisaari
Author Affiliation
Centre of Excellence for Work Organizations, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. jari.hakanen@ttl.fi
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2011 Jul;16(3):345-60
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aptitude
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
This three-wave 35-year prospective study used the Job Demands-Resources model and life course epidemiology to examine how life conditions in adolescence (1961-1963) through achieved educational level and working conditions in early adulthood (1985) may be indirectly related to job burnout 35 years later (1998). We used data (N = 511) from the Finnish Healthy Child study (1961-1963) to investigate the hypothesized relationships by employing structural equation modeling analyses. The results supported the hypothesized model in which both socioeconomic status and cognitive ability in adolescence (1961-1963) were positively associated with educational level (measured in 1985), which in turn was related to working conditions in early adulthood (1985). Furthermore, working conditions (1985) were associated with job burnout (1998) 13 years later. Moreover, adult education (1985) and skill variety (1985) mediated the associations between original socioeconomic status and cognitive ability, and burnout over a 35-year time period. The results suggest that socioeconomic, individual, and work-related resources may accumulate over the life course and may protect employees from job burnout.
PubMed ID
21728440 View in PubMed
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Above and beyond: A qualitative study of the work of nurses and care assistants in long term care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306747
Source
Work. 2020; 65(3):509-516
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2020
Author
Emily Gard Marshall
Melissa Power
Nancy Edgecombe
Melissa K Andrew
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Primary Care Research Unit, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
Work. 2020; 65(3):509-516
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Family
Focus Groups
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Long-Term Care
Nova Scotia
Nursing Assistants
Nursing Homes
Nursing Staff - psychology
Qualitative Research
Terminal Care
Work Engagement
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
As the Canadian population ages, there is a need to improve long-term care (LTC) services. An increased understanding of the positive work experiences of LTC staff may help attract more human health resources to LTC.
To describe the perceptions of the roles and work of nurses and care assistants in LTC from interprofessional perspectives.
This study used qualitative data collected from a larger mixed-methods study, Care by Design. The qualitative phase explored the lived experience of LTC staff from the perspectives of key stakeholders via focus groups and individual interviews.
One central theme that emerged from the study was that of LTC staff going "above and beyond" their clinical duties to care for residents. This above and beyond theme was categorized into subthemes including: 1. familial bonds between residents and staff; 2. staff spending additional time with residents; 3. the ability to provide comfort to family members; and 4. staff dedication during end-of-life care.
The findings show that staff develop a kinship with residents, demonstrate respect towards residents' families and provide comfort at the end-of-life. In emphasizing these themes of positive and fulfilling work, the present study provides insight into why staff work in LTC.
PubMed ID
32116270 View in PubMed
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Absence of response: a study of nurses' experience of stress in the workplace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183994
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Brita Olofsson
Claire Bengtsson
Eva Brink
Author Affiliation
Northern Elvsborg County Hospital, University of Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Sweden.
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Feedback
Frustration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Models, Psychological
Morale
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation Centers
Risk factors
Sweden
Workload
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
It has become clear that nursing is a high-risk occupation with regards to stress-related diseases. In this study, we were interested in nurses' experiences of stress and the emotions arising from stress at work. Results showed that nurses experienced negative stress which was apparently related to the social environment in which they worked. Four nurses were interviewed. The method used was grounded theory. Analysis of the interviews singled out absence of response as the core category. Recurring stressful situations obviously caused problems for the nurses in their daily work. Not only did they lack responses from their supervisors, they also experienced emotions of frustration, powerlessness, hopelessness and inadequacy, which increased the general stress experienced at work. Our conclusion is that the experience of absence of response leads to negative stress in nurses.
PubMed ID
12930542 View in PubMed
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"A call for a clear assignment" - A focus group study of the ambulance service in Sweden, as experienced by present and former employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292617
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 01; 36:1-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2018
Author
Helena Rosén
Johan Persson
Andreas Rantala
Lina Behm
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, SE 221 00 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: helena.rosen@med.lu.se.
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 01; 36:1-6
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances - manpower
Attitude of Health Personnel
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Emergency Medical Technicians - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Workplace - psychology - standards
Abstract
The aim was to explore the ambulance service as experienced by present and former employees.
Over the last decade, the number of ambulance assignments has increased annually by about 10%, and as many as 50% of all ambulance assignments are considered non-urgent. This raises questions about which assignments the Ambulance Service (AS) is supposed to deal with.
Data were collected from three focus group interviews with a total of 18 present and former employees of the Swedish AS. An inductive qualitative analysis method developed by Krueger was chosen.
Five themes emerged in the analysis: "Poor guidance for practice", "An unclear assignment", "Being a gate keeper", "From saving lives to self-care" and "Working in no man's land", which together constitute the AS.
Present and former employees of the AS in Sweden describe their mission as unclear and recognize the lack of consensus and a clearly developed mission statement. Furthermore, expectations and training mainly focus on emergency response, which is contrary to the reality of the ambulance clinicians' everyday work.
PubMed ID
28712766 View in PubMed
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Access to health programs at the workplace and the reduction of work presenteeism: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106463
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2013 Nov;55(11):1318-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Arnaldo Sanchez Bustillos
Oswaldo Ortiz Trigoso
Author Affiliation
From the School of Population and Public Health (Dr Bustillos), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; and Occupational Medicine Postgraduate Program (Dr Trigoso), Faculty of Medicine, Cayetano Heredia University, Lima, Peru.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2013 Nov;55(11):1318-22
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Efficiency
Female
Health promotion
Health Services Accessibility
Health Surveys
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Self Report
Sick Leave
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Work - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine access to health programs at workplace as a determinant of presenteeism among adults.
Data source was a subsample of the 2009-2010 Canadian Community Health Survey. The outcome was self-reported reduced activities at work (presenteeism). The explanatory variable was self-reported access to a health program at workplace. Logistic regression was used to measure the association between outcome and explanatory variables adjusting for potential confounders.
Adjusting for sex, age, education, income, work stress, and chronic conditions, presenteeism was not associated with having access to a health program at workplace (adjusted odds ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.91 to 1.65). The odds of presenteeism were higher in workers who reported high work stress and those with chronic medical conditions.
This study found that access to health programs at workplace is not significantly associated with a decline in presenteeism.
PubMed ID
24164761 View in PubMed
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Act with respect: Views of supportive actions for older workers after completion of comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302114
Source
Work. 2019; 62(4):585-598
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2019
Author
Stina Wallin
Anncristine Fjellman-Wiklund
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education and Welfare Studies, Health Sciences, Åbo Akademi University, Vaasa, Finland.
Source
Work. 2019; 62(4):585-598
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - psychology
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Finland
Focus Groups - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Rehabilitation, Vocational - methods - standards
Respect
Social Support
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace - psychology - standards
Abstract
The number of older workers will expand during the next decades. Older workers have more long-term health problems and related limitations.
This study examined supportive actions provided in occupational healthcare services to older workers after vocational rehabilitation. An additional purpose was to explore occupational healthcare professionals' views on how to realize and improve adequate support activities.
Qualitative and quantitative methods were used, including a postal questionnaire and focus group discussions. Sixty-seven occupational healthcare service units participated in the postal questionnaire. Eight occupational healthcare professionals participated in two focus group discussions. The qualitative data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis.
The qualitative analysis resulted in one theme (Act with respect), and four categories (Need for cooperation, Collaborative resources of involved stakeholders, Individual needs for support, and Gender as homogenous and separate groups). Quantitative results revealed that the workers' initiative strongly influenced the support carried out. Recommendations from the rehabilitation clinic were almost always considered when deciding on supportive actions. Focus group discussions brought up gender differences especially highlighted in the category Gender as homogenous and separate groups.
Appropriate support of older workers requires cooperation between involved stakeholders, including occupational healthcare services. Provided support should be based on individual needs, but a mutual practice of determining needed support is requested.
PubMed ID
31104047 View in PubMed
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Adjustment latitude and attendance requirements as determinants of sickness absence or attendance. Empirical tests of the illness flexibility model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71100
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2004 May;58(10):1857-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Gun Johansson
Ingvar Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. gun.johansson@smd.sll.se
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2004 May;58(10):1857-68
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comparative Study
Decision Making
Employment
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Psychology, Industrial
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Workplace - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study investigates whether the two dimensions of illness flexibility at work, adjustment latitude and attendance requirements are associated to sickness absence and sickness attendance. Adjustment latitude describes the opportunities people have to reduce or in other ways change their work-effort when ill. Such opportunities can be to choose among work tasks or work at a slower pace. Attendance requirements describe negative consequences of being away from work that can affect either the subject, work mates or a third party. In a cross-sectional design data based on self-reports from a questionnaire from 4924 inhabitants in the county of Stockholm were analysed. The results showed that low adjustment latitude, as predicted, increased women's sickness absence. However, it did not show any relation to men's sickness absence and men's and women's sickness attendance. Attendance requirements were strongly associated to both men's and women's sickness absence and sickness attendance in the predicted way. Those more often required to attend were less likely to be absent and more likely to attend work at illness. As this is the first study of how illness flexibility at work affects behaviour at illness, it was concluded that more studies are needed.
PubMed ID
15020004 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use and misuse: what are the contributions of occupation and work organization conditions?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155014
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:333
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Alain Marchand
Author Affiliation
School of Industrial Relations, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada. alain.marchand@umontreal.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:333
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology
Employment - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations - classification
Quebec
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications
Workplace - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This research examines the specific contribution of occupation and work organization conditions to alcohol use and misuse. It is based on a social-action model that takes into account agent personality, structures of daily life, and macro social structures.
Data come from a representative sample of 10,155 workers in Quebec, Canada. Multinomial regression models corrected for sample design effect have been used to predict low-risk and high-risk drinking compared to non-drinkers. The contribution of occupation and work organization conditions (skill used, decision authority, physical and psychological demands, hours worked, irregular work schedule, harassment, unionization, job insecurity, performance pay, prestige) have been adjusted for family situation, social network outside the workplace, and individual characteristics.
Compared to non-qualified blue-collars, both low-risk and high-risk drinking are associated with qualified blue-collars, semi-qualified white-collars, and middle managers; high-risk drinking is associated with upper managers. For constraints-resources related to work organization conditions, only workplace harassment is an important determinant of both low-risk and high-risk drinking, but it is modestly moderated by occupation. Family situation, social support outside work, and personal characteristics of individuals are also associated with alcohol use and misuse. Non-work factors mediated/suppressed the role of occupation and work organization conditions.
Occupation and workplace harassment are important factors associated with alcohol use and misuse. The results support the theoretical model conceptualizing alcohol use and misuse as being the product of stress caused by constraints and resources brought to bear simultaneously by agent personality, structures of daily life, and macro social structures. Occupational alcohol researchers must expand their theoretical perspectives to avoid erroneous conclusions about the specific role of the workplace.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18816388 View in PubMed
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Alcohol Use and Psychosocial Stressors in the Norwegian Workforce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295912
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2018 03 21; 53(4):574-584
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-21-2018
Author
Morten Birkeland Nielsen
Johannes Gjerstad
Michael R Frone
Author Affiliation
a National Institute of Occupational Health , Oslo , Norway.
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2018 03 21; 53(4):574-584
Date
03-21-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although alcohol use can have detrimental effects for employees, little is known about the prevalence, distribution, and correlates in the Norwegian workforce.
To determine the overall and the work-related prevalence of weekly alcohol use, and to establish associations between psychosocial work stressors and alcohol use among Norwegian employees.
Data were from a 2015 national probability sample of 1,608 Norwegian employees (response rate 32%). Job demands, lack of job control, role expectations, workplace bullying, and leadership were examined as correlates of several dimensions of alcohol use.
Average weekly alcohol consumption was 4.28 units (SD = 7.91). Male workers reported significantly higher consumption than female workers. Also, 2.6% of male and 2.0% of female workers reported problematic alcohol use. Only 0.1% of workers reported weekly alcohol use before the workday, 0.4% reported weekly use during the workday, 20.1% reported weekly use after ending the work day, and 80% reported use during weekends/days off. Alcohol intake increased with age, but was not related to marital status, educational level, work schedule, or leadership position. Problematic alcohol use was related to job demands and workplace bullying. Alcohol use after work was positively related to lack of job control and role ambiguity and negatively related to bullying. Conclusions/importance: Weekly alcohol use before and during the workday is not prevalent among Norwegian workers. Interventions to reduce job demands and workplace bullying may reduce problematic alcohol intake, whereas increasing job control and reducing role ambiguity may reduce after work use.
PubMed ID
28910176 View in PubMed
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506 records – page 1 of 51.