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1591 records – page 1 of 160.

A 5-year follow-up study of aggression at work and psychological health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51790
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2005;12(4):256-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Annie Hogh
Marie Engström Henriksson
Hermann Burr
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, Lersø Parkallé 105, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. ah@ami.dk
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2005;12(4):256-65
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Organizational Culture
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Workplace
Abstract
In a longitudinal cohort study, organizational climate and long-term effects of exposure to nasty teasing (aggression) at work were investigated. The baseline consisted of a representative sample of Danish employees in 1995 with a response rate of 80% (N = 5,652). Of these, 4,647 participated in the follow-up in 2000 (response rate 84%). In 1995, 6.3% were subjected to nasty teasing with no significant gender difference. At baseline, we found significant associations among nasty teasing, a negative organizational climate, and psychological health effects. In the follow-up analyses, associations were found between exposure to nasty teasing at baseline and psychological health problems at follow-up, even when controlled for organizational climate and psychological health at baseline and nasty teasing at follow-up. Stratified for gender, the follow-up associations were significant for women but not for men. Low coworker support and conflicts at baseline and teasing at follow-up mediated the effects on men.
PubMed ID
16262544 View in PubMed
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A 35-year follow-up study on burnout among Finnish employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133208
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2011 Jul;16(3):345-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Jari J Hakanen
Arnold B Bakker
Markku Jokisaari
Author Affiliation
Centre of Excellence for Work Organizations, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. jari.hakanen@ttl.fi
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2011 Jul;16(3):345-60
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aptitude
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
This three-wave 35-year prospective study used the Job Demands-Resources model and life course epidemiology to examine how life conditions in adolescence (1961-1963) through achieved educational level and working conditions in early adulthood (1985) may be indirectly related to job burnout 35 years later (1998). We used data (N = 511) from the Finnish Healthy Child study (1961-1963) to investigate the hypothesized relationships by employing structural equation modeling analyses. The results supported the hypothesized model in which both socioeconomic status and cognitive ability in adolescence (1961-1963) were positively associated with educational level (measured in 1985), which in turn was related to working conditions in early adulthood (1985). Furthermore, working conditions (1985) were associated with job burnout (1998) 13 years later. Moreover, adult education (1985) and skill variety (1985) mediated the associations between original socioeconomic status and cognitive ability, and burnout over a 35-year time period. The results suggest that socioeconomic, individual, and work-related resources may accumulate over the life course and may protect employees from job burnout.
PubMed ID
21728440 View in PubMed
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The 2005 British Columbia Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign and short-term changes in smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164149
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lynda Gagné
Author Affiliation
School of Public Administration at University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. lgagne@uvic.ca
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Public Health Administration - methods
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Marketing
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the 2005 British Columbia Ministry of Health Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign on short-term smoking behavior.
National cross-sectional data are used with a quasi-experimental approach to test the impact of the campaign.
Findings indicate that prevalence and average number of cigarettes smoked per day deviated upward from trend for the rest of Canada (P = .08; P = .01) but not for British Columbia. They also indicate that British Columbia smokers in lower risk groups reduced their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend (-2.23; P = .10), whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did not, and that British Columbia smokers in high-risk groups did not increase their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend, whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did (2.97; P = .01).
The overall poorer performance of high-risk groups is attributed to high exposure to cigarette smoking, which reduces a smoker's chances of successful cessation. In particular, high-risk groups are by definition more likely to be exposed to smoking by peers, but are also less likely to work in workplaces with smoking bans, which are shown to have a substantial impact on prevalence. Results suggest that for mass media campaigns to be more effective with high-risk groups, they need to be combined with other incentives, and that more prolonged interventions should be considered.
PubMed ID
17435497 View in PubMed
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Absence of response: a study of nurses' experience of stress in the workplace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183994
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Brita Olofsson
Claire Bengtsson
Eva Brink
Author Affiliation
Northern Elvsborg County Hospital, University of Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Sweden.
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Feedback
Frustration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Models, Psychological
Morale
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation Centers
Risk factors
Sweden
Workload
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
It has become clear that nursing is a high-risk occupation with regards to stress-related diseases. In this study, we were interested in nurses' experiences of stress and the emotions arising from stress at work. Results showed that nurses experienced negative stress which was apparently related to the social environment in which they worked. Four nurses were interviewed. The method used was grounded theory. Analysis of the interviews singled out absence of response as the core category. Recurring stressful situations obviously caused problems for the nurses in their daily work. Not only did they lack responses from their supervisors, they also experienced emotions of frustration, powerlessness, hopelessness and inadequacy, which increased the general stress experienced at work. Our conclusion is that the experience of absence of response leads to negative stress in nurses.
PubMed ID
12930542 View in PubMed
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Absenteeism following a workplace intervention for older food industry workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133397
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2011 Dec;61(8):583-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
A. Siukola
P. Virtanen
H. Huhtala
C-H Nygård
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, FI-33014 University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. anna.siukola@uta.fi
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2011 Dec;61(8):583-5
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Age Factors
Finland
Food Industry
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health Services - methods
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Workplace
Abstract
The effects of workplace interventions on sickness absence are poorly understood, in particular in ageing workers.
To analyse the effects of a senior programme on sickness absence among blue-collar food industry workers of a food company in Finland.
We followed up 129 employees aged 55 years or older, who participated in a senior programme (intervention group), and 229 employees of the same age from the same company who did not participate (control group). Total sickness absence days and spells of 1-3, 4-7, 8-21 and >21 days were recorded for the members of the intervention group from the year before joining the programme and for the control group starting at age 54 years. Both groups were followed for up to 6 years.
The median number of sickness absence days per person-year increased significantly from baseline in both groups during the follow-up. Compared with the control group, the intervention group had increased risk for 1-3 days spells [rate ratio 1.34 (1.21-1.48)] and 4-7 days spells [rate ratio 1.23 (1.07-1.41)], but the risk for >21 days spells was decreased [rate ratio 0.68 (0.53-0.88)] after participation in the senior programme.
A programme to enhance individual work well-being in ageing workers may increase short-term but reduce long-term sickness absence.
PubMed ID
21709171 View in PubMed
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Absenteeism screening questionnaire (ASQ): a new tool for predicting long-term absenteeism among workers with low back pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132639
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):27-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Manon Truchon
Marie-Ève Schmouth
Denis Côté
Lise Fillion
Michel Rossignol
Marie-José Durand
Author Affiliation
Département des Relations Industrielles, Université Laval, Québec, Canada. manon.truchon@rlt.ulaval.ca
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):27-50
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Fear - psychology
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - psychology
Male
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Quebec
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Work
Workplace
Abstract
Over the last decades, psychosocial factors were identified by many studies as significant predictive variables in the development of disability related to common low back disorders, which thus contributed to the development of biopsychosocial prevention interventions. Biopsychosocial interventions were supposed to be more effective than usual interventions in improving different outcomes. Unfortunately, most of these interventions show inconclusive results. The use of screening questionnaires was proposed as a solution to improve their efficacy. The aim of this study was to validate a new screening questionnaire to identify workers at risk of being absent from work for more than 182 cumulative days and who are more susceptible to benefit from prevention interventions.
Injured workers receiving income replacement benefits from the Quebec Compensation Board (n = 535) completed a 67-item questionnaire in the sub-acute stage of pain and provided information about work-related events 6 and 12 months later. Reliability and validity of the 67-item questionnaire were determined respectively by test-retest reliability and internal consistency analysis, as well as by construct validity analyses. The Cox regression model and the maximum likelihood method were used to fix a model allowing calculation of a probability of absence of more than 182 days. Criterion validity and discriminative capacity of this model were calculated.
Sub-sections from the 67-item questionnaire were moderately to highly correlated 2 weeks later (r = 0.52-0.80) and showed moderate to good internal consistency (0.70-0.94). Among the 67-item questionnaire, six sub-sections and variables (22 items) were predictive of long-term absence from work: fear-avoidance beliefs related to work, return to work expectations, annual family income before-taxes, last level of education attained, work schedule and work concerns. The area under the ROC curve was 73%.
The significant predictive variables of long-term absence from work were dominated by workplace conditions and individual perceptions about work. In association with individual psychosocial variables, these variables could contribute to identify potentially useful prevention interventions and to reduce the significant costs associated with LBP long-term absenteeism.
PubMed ID
21796374 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Aug;96(7):6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
K. Lowry
Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Aug;96(7):6
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Humans
Nursing Staff
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence
Workplace
Notes
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2000 Oct;96(9):611865507
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2000 Oct;96(9):6, 811865508
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2000 Sep;96(8):411865612
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2000 Sep;96(8):411865611
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2000 Oct;96(9):811865509
PubMed ID
11865524 View in PubMed
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"A call for a clear assignment" - A focus group study of the ambulance service in Sweden, as experienced by present and former employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292617
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 01; 36:1-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2018
Author
Helena Rosén
Johan Persson
Andreas Rantala
Lina Behm
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, SE 221 00 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: helena.rosen@med.lu.se.
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 01; 36:1-6
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances - manpower
Attitude of Health Personnel
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Emergency Medical Technicians - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Workplace - psychology - standards
Abstract
The aim was to explore the ambulance service as experienced by present and former employees.
Over the last decade, the number of ambulance assignments has increased annually by about 10%, and as many as 50% of all ambulance assignments are considered non-urgent. This raises questions about which assignments the Ambulance Service (AS) is supposed to deal with.
Data were collected from three focus group interviews with a total of 18 present and former employees of the Swedish AS. An inductive qualitative analysis method developed by Krueger was chosen.
Five themes emerged in the analysis: "Poor guidance for practice", "An unclear assignment", "Being a gate keeper", "From saving lives to self-care" and "Working in no man's land", which together constitute the AS.
Present and former employees of the AS in Sweden describe their mission as unclear and recognize the lack of consensus and a clearly developed mission statement. Furthermore, expectations and training mainly focus on emergency response, which is contrary to the reality of the ambulance clinicians' everyday work.
PubMed ID
28712766 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of the POWERPLAY Program: A Workplace Health Promotion Intervention for Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292610
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1809-1822
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Cherisse L Seaton
Joan L Bottorff
John L Oliffe
Margaret Jones-Bricker
Cristina M Caperchione
Steven T Johnson
Paul Sharp
Author Affiliation
1 Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, Canada.
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1809-1822
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Men's health
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace
Young Adult
Abstract
The workplace health promotion program, POWERPLAY, was developed, implemented, and comprehensively evaluated among men working in four male-dominated worksites in northern British Columbia, Canada. The purpose of this study was to explore the POWERPLAY program's acceptability and gather recommendations for program refinement. The mixed-method study included end-of-program survey data collected from 103 male POWERPLAY program participants, interviews with workplace leads, and field notes recorded during program implementation. Data analyses involved descriptive statistics for quantitative data and inductive analysis of open-ended questions and qualitative data. Among participants, 70 (69%) reported being satisfied with the program, 51 (51%) perceived the program to be tailored for northern men, 56 (62%) believed the handouts provided useful information, and 75 (74%) would recommend this program to other men. The findings also highlight program implementation experiences with respect to employee engagement, feedback, and recommendations for future delivery. The POWERPLAY program provides an acceptable approach for health promotion that can serve as a model for advancing men's health in other contexts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28884636 View in PubMed
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Access to health programs at the workplace and the reduction of work presenteeism: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106463
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2013 Nov;55(11):1318-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Arnaldo Sanchez Bustillos
Oswaldo Ortiz Trigoso
Author Affiliation
From the School of Population and Public Health (Dr Bustillos), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; and Occupational Medicine Postgraduate Program (Dr Trigoso), Faculty of Medicine, Cayetano Heredia University, Lima, Peru.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2013 Nov;55(11):1318-22
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Efficiency
Female
Health promotion
Health Services Accessibility
Health Surveys
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Self Report
Sick Leave
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Work - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine access to health programs at workplace as a determinant of presenteeism among adults.
Data source was a subsample of the 2009-2010 Canadian Community Health Survey. The outcome was self-reported reduced activities at work (presenteeism). The explanatory variable was self-reported access to a health program at workplace. Logistic regression was used to measure the association between outcome and explanatory variables adjusting for potential confounders.
Adjusting for sex, age, education, income, work stress, and chronic conditions, presenteeism was not associated with having access to a health program at workplace (adjusted odds ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.91 to 1.65). The odds of presenteeism were higher in workers who reported high work stress and those with chronic medical conditions.
This study found that access to health programs at workplace is not significantly associated with a decline in presenteeism.
PubMed ID
24164761 View in PubMed
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1591 records – page 1 of 160.