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Age-related accident risks: longitudinal study of Swedish iron ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210969
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
L. Laflamme
V L Blank
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Back Injuries
Bone and Bones - injuries
Contusions - epidemiology
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Efficiency
Facial Injuries - epidemiology
Hand Injuries - epidemiology
Humans
Iron
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mining - classification - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Workload
Abstract
The study investigated whether occupational accident risks were equally distributed across age categories over time in the context of production reorganization and work rationalization in a Swedish iron ore mine between 1980 and 1993. Three phases of reorganization, defined by productivity levels, and four age categories were related to age-related accident risk ratios using the Poisson-regression method. Accident risk ratios (ARRs) were found systematically to be higher during the two first phases and also for younger workers, in the cases of both nonspecific and specific accident risks. The steady reduction in accident rates observed did not favor all age groups of workers to the same extent. For two accident patterns out of five, workers in their thirties and forties recorded higher ARRs than those in their fifties.
PubMed ID
8892554 View in PubMed
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Air traffic controller burnout: survey responses regarding job demands, job resources, and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82284
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2006 Apr;77(4):422-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Martinussen Monica
Richardsen Astrid M
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Tromsø, Norway. monicam@psyk.uit.no
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2006 Apr;77(4):422-8
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Aviation
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Occupations
Professional Autonomy
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Social Support
Workload
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: There are currently many changes taking place in the aviation system affecting the work of air traffic controllers (ATCOs), and thus it was considered important to assess work-related demands and stress responses among ATCOs. The purpose of this study was to assess the level of burnout among ATCOs compared with other professions; to examine the relationship between job demands, job resources, and burnout; and to examine if burnout could predict both work- and health-related outcomes. METHOD: The participants were 209 Norwegian ATCOs and data were collected using a questionnaire distributed to 500 ATCOs. The study was part of a national survey of both health care and non-health care professions. RESULTS: ATCOs did not score high on burnout compared with the three comparisons groups (police, journalists, and building constructors); in fact, ATCOs scored significantly lower on exhaustion compared with journalists (Hedges g=65) and building constructors (Hedges g=63), and not significantly different from police officers. Both job demands and job resources were related to burnout; work conflict especially was an important predictor for all of the three burnout dimensions. Burnout predicted psychosomatic complaints (r2=0.48), satisfaction with life (r2=0.25), and other work outcomes. DISCUSSION: The overall level of burnout was not high among ATCOs compared with other professions, which may be related to selection procedures for the profession. Burnout was related to important outcome variables such as psychosomatic complaints and attitudes toward work.
PubMed ID
16676654 View in PubMed
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American and Icelandic parents' perceptions of the health status of their young children with chronic asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15207
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2003;35(4):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Erla Kolbrun Svavarsdóttir
Mary Kay Rayens
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Faculty of Nursing, Eirbergi, Eiriksgata 34, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. eks@hi.is
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2003;35(4):351-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Asthma - prevention & control
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Welfare
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Cost of Illness
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Iceland
Male
Midwestern United States
Models, Psychological
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Workload
Abstract
PURPOSE: To identify factors that influence American and Icelandic parents' health perceptions among families of infants or young children with asthma. DESIGN: A cross-sectional research design of 76 American families and 103 Icelandic families. Data were collected mainly in the Midwest of the United States (US) and in Iceland from August 1996 through January 2000. METHOD: Parents in these two countries who had children aged 6 or younger with chronic asthma completed questionnaires regarding family demands, caregiving demands, family hardiness, sense of coherence, and health perceptions. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and t tests were compiled. Multiple regression analysis was used to test path models and for mediation. FINDINGS: American parents differed from their Icelandic counterparts in family hardiness. In both countries, significant differences were found in caregiving demands and health perceptions between mothers and fathers. Illness severity and caregiving demands affected health perceptions of both mothers and fathers. Sense of coherence mediated the relationship between family demands and parents' perceptions for both parents. For mothers only, family hardiness mediated the relationship between family demands and health perceptions. CONCLUSIONS: The Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation was useful for building knowledge on parents' health perceptions in two Western cultures for families of young children with asthma. Interventions emphasizing family and individual resiliency and strengths have the potential to affect parents' views of their children's health.
PubMed ID
14735678 View in PubMed
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The association between job strain and atrial fibrillation in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262656
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2015 Mar;72(3):177-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Kjell Torén
Linus Schiöler
Mia Söderberg
Kok Wai Giang
Annika Rosengren
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2015 Mar;72(3):177-80
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - etiology
Employment - psychology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Power (Psychology)
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Work - psychology
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether psychosocial stress defined as high strain based on the job demand-control model increases risk for atrial fibrillation.
The present study comprised 6035 men born between 1915 and 1925 and free from previous coronary heart disease, atrial fibrillation and stroke at baseline (1974-1977). Work-related psychosocial stress was measured using a job-exposure matrix for the job demand-control model based on occupation at baseline. The participants were followed from baseline examination until death, hospital discharge or 75 years of age, using the Swedish national register on cause of death and the Swedish hospital discharge register for any registration for atrial fibrillation, resulting in the identification of 436 cases. Data were analysed with Cox regression models with atrial fibrillation as the outcome using high strain as the explanatory variable adjusted for age, smoking, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes and socioeconomic status.
There was an increased risk for atrial fibrillation in relation to high strain (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.003 to 1.75). When the four categories of the job-strain model were included and low strain was used as reference, the risk for high strain decreased (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.82).
Exposure to occupational psychosocial stress defined as high strain may be associated with increased risk for atrial fibrillation. The observed increase in risk is small and residual confounding may also be present.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25523937 View in PubMed
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Career and parenting satisfaction among medical students, residents and physician teachers at a Canadian medical school.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199065
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Mar 7;162(5):637-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-7-2000
Author
B. Cujec
T. Oancia
C. Bohm
D. Johnson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon. cujec@v-wave.com
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Mar 7;162(5):637-40
Date
Mar-7-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Medical
Faculty
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Parenting
Regression Analysis
Saskatchewan
Students, Medical - psychology
Workload
Abstract
Studies of career and parenting satisfaction have focused separately on medical students, residents and practising physicians. The objective of this study was to compare satisfaction across a spectrum of stages of medical career.
A survey of incoming medical students, current medical students, residents and physician teachers at the University of Saskatchewan was conducted in the spring of 1997. Response rates were 77% (43/56), 81% (177/218), 65% (134/206) and 39% (215/554) respectively. Factors assessed in the stepwise regression analysis were the effect of sex, parenting and level of training on the likelihood of recommending parenting to medical students or residents, and on parenting dissatisfaction, job dissatisfaction, career dissatisfaction and the importance of flexibility within the college program to accommodate family obligations.
More male than female physician teachers had partners (92% v. 81%, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
10738448 View in PubMed
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Changes in the work and motivation of staff delivering home care services in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202914
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Feb;16(1):60-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
R. Laamanen
U. Broms
A. Häppölä
M. Brommels
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Feb;16(1):60-71
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Finland
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Job Description
Job Satisfaction
Models, organizational
Motivation
Nurse Administrators - psychology
Nursing Staff - organization & administration - psychology
Organizational Innovation
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Workload
Abstract
This article describes how the policy to emphasize noninstitutional care is reflected in home care service strategies and work characteristics as well as the work motivation of home care staff in Finland. The data were gathered through a questionnaire answered by 312 employees in home care services and 22 social welfare and primary health care administrators. The methods of analysis used were cross-tabulations, one-way analysis of variance, and regression analysis. According to the results, institutional care had been reduced too fast and home care services had not been developed sufficiently. Most of the staff reported that their work had changed considerably. Although their work had become more interesting and more independent, over one third of the employees felt that the pressure of work had become unbearable and their responsibility was too heavy. The views of the home care staff differed from those of the administrators regarding the change strategies that had been carried out. The majority of the staff were moderately or highly motivated. Thirty-four percent of the variance of work motivation was explained mainly by work characteristics. More attention should be paid to the development of home care services before institutional care is reduced. Training the staff and informing them about the planned reform should not be neglected.
PubMed ID
10074823 View in PubMed
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Chronic care management in Danish general practice--a cross-sectional study of workload and multimorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123694
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2012;13:52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Grete Moth
Mogens Vestergaard
Peter Vedsted
Author Affiliation
The Research Unit for General Practice, Aarhus University, Bartholins Alle 2, DK - 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark. g.moth@alm.au.dk
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2012;13:52
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Family Practice - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Female
General Practitioners - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Workload - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
About 30% of the Danish population has one or more chronic conditions, and general practitioners (GPs) play a key role in effective chronic care management. However, little is known about these encounters in general practice. The aim was to describe the frequency of patients with one or more chronic conditions in general practice and how these consultations were experienced by the GPs.
All GPs in the Central Denmark Region were invited to register all contacts during one day in the 12-month study period from December; 404 (46%) accepted. For each patient contact, the GPs were asked to fill in a one-page registration form covering information on chronic disease, reason for encounter, diagnosis, number of additional psychosocial problems raised by the patient during the consultation, time consumption, experienced burden of the consultation, referral to specialized care, and whether a nurse could have substituted the GP. Patients were categorized according to the number of chronic conditions (none, one, two, three or more) and the categories compared with regard to the GP-experienced burden of the contacts. Moreover, we examined which chronic conditions posed the the greatest challenge to the GPs.
Patients aged 40 years or more had a total of 8,236 contacts. Among these patients 2,849 (34.6%; 95% CI 33.6-35.6) had one and 2,596 (31.5%; CI 30.5-32.5) had more than one chronic disease. The time consumption and the burden of their contacts tended to rise with the number of chronic conditions. Being present in 22.9% (CI 21.6-24.3) of all face-to-face contacts, hypertension was the most common chronic condition. The burden of the contacts was experienced as particularly heavy for patients with depression and dementia due to more additional psychosocial problems and the time consumption.
General practitioners considered consultations with multimorbid patients demanding and not easily delegated to nurses. As the number of patients with chronic conditions and multimorbidity is increasing, GPs can be expected to face a heavier workload in the future.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22676446 View in PubMed
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[Chronic psychotropic drugs use in the Canadian labor force: what are the contributions of occupation and work organization conditions?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145168
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 2010 Apr;58(2):89-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
A. Marchand
M-E Blanc
Author Affiliation
Ecole de relations industrielles, université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec, H3C 3J7 Canada. alain.marchand@umontreal.ca
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 2010 Apr;58(2):89-99
Date
Apr-2010
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Employment - organization & administration - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Social Environment
Stress, Psychological - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Workload - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
This study aims to better understand the contributions of occupation and work organization conditions to the development of chronic psychotropic drugs use among workers in Canada.
The study is based on a secondary analysis of the longitudinal data of the National Population Health Survey (NPHS) of Statistics Canada which includes five cycles from 1994-1995 to 2002-2003. A panel of 6585 people from 15 to 55 years old and employed at cycle 1 and nested in 1413 neighbourhoods was selected. Multilevel models of regression were estimated on three levels: repeated measures (level 1=24,785 observations) were nested in the individuals (level 2=6585 individuals) and the individuals nested in the local communities (level 3=1413 neighborhoods).
The prevalence of multiple episodes (two episodes and more between cycle 1 and cycle 5) of psychotropic drugs use was 6.7% (95%CI=6.0-7.4%). Only occupation and the number of working hours showed a significant contribution. Family and individual variables like marital status and personality traits (locus of control and sense of coherence) had a significant contribution, in addition to time, gender, age, physical health, number of cigarettes and stressful childhood events.
Work contributes weakly to the risk of chronic psychotropic drugs use, whereas individual characteristics make a much more important contribution to the phenomenon.
PubMed ID
20189332 View in PubMed
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Clinical workload decreases the level of aerobic fitness in housestaff physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205356
Source
J Cardiopulm Rehabil. 1998 May-Jun;18(3):216-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
N. Suskin
G. Ryan
J. Fardy
H. Clarke
R. McKelvie
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Cardiopulm Rehabil. 1998 May-Jun;18(3):216-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Over Studies
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Newfoundland and Labrador
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness
Regression Analysis
Workload
Abstract
To examine the relationship between clinical workload and aerobic fitness.
Twenty healthy intern and resident volunteers were studied in a cross over manner to compare their aerobic fitness after a 1 month "easy" clinical rotation (ECR) to that after a 1 month "hard" clinical rotation (HCR). The ECR and HCR were prospectively estimated as requiring 70 (HCR) total hours per week of hospital work respectively. Aerobic fitness was determined by directly measuring peak oxygen uptake (peakVO2) during peak cycle exercise testing after each rotation. Clinical workload for the month preceding the exercise test was estimated by documenting the amount of hospital work and sleep lost because of on-call duties. The average weekly amount of effective aerobic training for each rotation was also documented.
Trainees had a 206.4 (P = 0.0019, 95% CI 94-318.8) mL/min or 3 mL/kg/min (P = 0.0019, 95% CI 1.5-4.4) improvement of peakVO2 after the ECR compared with the HCR. Trainees averaged 1 (95% CI 0.16-1.81) less hour per week of exercise training, 34.1 more hours per week of hospital work (95% CI 23.0-45.3, P
PubMed ID
9632323 View in PubMed
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Comparing the characteristics and attitudes of physicians in different primary care settings: The Ontario Walk-in Clinic Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187793
Source
Fam Pract. 2002 Dec;19(6):647-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
A Paul Williams
Jan Barnsley
Eugene Vayda
Janusz Kaczorowski
Truls ØStbye
Elizabeth Wenghofer
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. paul.williams@utoronto.ca
Source
Fam Pract. 2002 Dec;19(6):647-57
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Humans
Ontario
Physicians, Family - psychology
Primary Health Care
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Workload
Abstract
In Canada, walk-in clinics (WICs) are a focus for debate about access to and the costs and quality of primary care. While WICs may offer patients easier access through longer hours and shorter waits, it has been argued that they may also lead to unnecessary utilization, duplication of services, lack of continuity of care, decreased quality and increased costs.
The main objectives were to analyse the characteristics and attitudes of physicians working in different family practice types including WICs.
We analysed the results of a 1998 survey of 728 primary care physicians in Ontario to compare physicians working in WICs with those working in solo and group family practices.
Our survey found that few physicians worked most or all of their hours in WICs; most worked in WICs and other family practice types. Compared to family physicians in solo and group practices, physicians working in WICs saw more patients who were not their regular patients, patients without appointments and children. They reported slightly higher frequencies of problems such as backlogs (patient queues) and patients who had sought care from other doctors for the same problem. WIC physicians were less satisfied than other physicians with their relations with patients. They were, however, more satisfied with the availability of consultation, support staff, hours, income, and vacation coverage. Further, WIC physicians assessed the quality of care in WICs to be neither better nor worse than that in other family practices.
We conclude that there are important similarities as well as differences, between physicians in WICs and those in more conventional family practices. The assessments of primary care physicians do not support the generally negative reputation of WICs. Instead, greater consideration should be given to the system-level issues which produce demand for WICs.
PubMed ID
12429669 View in PubMed
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76 records – page 1 of 8.