Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1429 records – page 1 of 143.

A 6-hour working day--effects on health and well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71230
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
T. Akerstedt
B. Olsson
M. Ingre
M. Holmgren
G. Kecklund
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Organizational Innovation
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The effect of the total amount of work hours and the benefits of a shortening is frequently debated, but very little data is available. The present study compared a group (N = 41) that obtained a 9 h reduction of the working week (to a 6 h day) with a comparison group (N = 22) that retained normal work hours. Both groups were constituted of mainly female health care and day care nursery personnel. The experimental group retained full pay and extra personnel were employed to compensate for loss of hours. Questionnaire data were obtained before and 1 year after the change. The data were analyzed using a two-factor ANOVA with the interaction term year*group as the main focus. The results showed a significant interaction of year*group for social factors, sleep quality, mental fatigue, and heart/respiratory complaints, and attitude to work hours. In all cases the experimental group improved whereas the control group did not change. It was concluded that shortened work hours have clear social effects and moderate effects on well-being.
PubMed ID
14564882 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Oct 13;90(41):3523-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-13-1993

A 24-month evaluation of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113423
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Michael S McCracken
Valeria V Gordan
Mark S Litaker
Ellen Funkhouser
Jeffrey L Fellows
Douglass G Shamp
Vibeke Qvist
Jeffrey S Meral
Gregg H Gilbert
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Community Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA.
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community-Based Participatory Research
Composite Resins - standards
Dental Amalgam - standards
Dental Materials - standards
Dental Prosthesis Repair - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration Failure - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification - standards
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Sex Factors
Surface Properties
United States
Workload
Young Adult
Abstract
Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations.
In this prospective cohort study, the authors gathered information from clinicians and offices participating in the network. Clinicians completed a baseline data collection form at the time of restoration placement and annually thereafter. Data collected included patient factors, practice factors and dentist factors, and the authors analyzed them by using mixed-model logistic regression.
A total of 226 practitioners followed up 6,218 direct restorations in 3,855 patients; 386 restorations failed (6.2 percent) during the mean (standard deviation) follow-up of 23.7 (8.8) months. The number of tooth surfaces restored at baseline helped predict subsequent restoration failure; restorations with four or more restored surfaces were more than four times more likely to fail. Restorative material was not associated significantly with longevity; neither was tooth type. Older patient age was associated highly with failure (P
Notes
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2005 Jun;136(6):790-616022046
Cites: Clin Oral Investig. 2003 Jun;7(2):63-7012768463
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Apr 19;295(15):1775-8316622139
Cites: J Dent. 2006 Aug;34(7):427-3516314023
Cites: Dent Mater J. 2006 Sep;25(3):611-517076335
Cites: J Dent. 2007 Feb;35(2):124-916956709
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2007 Jun;138(6):763-7217545265
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2007 Jun;138(6):775-8317545266
Cites: Public Health Rep. 2007 Sep-Oct;122(5):657-6317877313
Cites: J Adhes Dent. 2007 Oct;9(5):469-7518297828
Cites: Br Dent J. 2003 Jun 14;194(11):613-8; discussion 60912819697
Cites: J Dent. 2012 Oct;40(10):829-3522771415
Cites: J Dent. 2003 Aug;31(6):395-40512878022
Cites: J Med Syst. 2003 Oct;27(5):445-5614584621
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2004 May;135(5):637-4515202758
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 1988 May;116(6):651-43164030
Cites: J Dent. 1996 Jul;24(4):257-628783530
Cites: Oper Dent. 1994 Jul-Aug;19(4):127-329028231
Cites: Br Dent J. 1997 May 24;182(10):373-819185355
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 1998 Dec;129(12):1757-99854929
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Mar;116(3):394-918335109
Cites: J Dent. 2008 May;36(5):343-5018313826
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2010 Apr;141(4):441-820354094
Cites: J Dent. 2005 Nov;33(10):827-3516246480
Cites: J Dent. 2012 May;40(5):397-40522342563
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 1999 Oct;57(5):257-6210614902
Cites: J Dent. 2000 Feb;28(2):111-610666968
Cites: J Adhes Dent. 2001 Spring;3(1):45-6411317384
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 2001 Apr;59(2):57-6211370750
Cites: Community Dent Health. 2001 Dec;18(4):236-4111789702
Cites: Oper Dent. 2002 Sep-Oct;27(5):488-9212216568
Cites: Community Dent Health. 2010 Mar;27(1):18-2220426256
Cites: J Dent Res. 2010 Oct;89(10):1063-720660797
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2011 Apr;142(4):429-4021454850
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2011 Jun;142(6):622-3221628683
Cites: Dent Mater. 2012 Jan;28(1):87-10122192253
Cites: Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2012 May;88(5):797-80122395198
Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):1220, 122224177394
Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):122024177393
PubMed ID
23729455 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 120-S minute: using analysis of work activity to prevent psychological distress among elementary school teachers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209722
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 1997 Jan;2(1):45-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
K. Messing
A M Seifert
E. Escalona
Author Affiliation
Centre Pour l'Etude des Interactions Biologiques Entre la Santé et l'Environment (CINBIOSE), Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada. messing.karen@uqam.ca
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 1997 Jan;2(1):45-62
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Middle Aged
Quebec
Risk factors
Social Environment
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications - prevention & control
Teaching
Time and Motion Studies
Workload - psychology
Abstract
Primary school teachers in Québec suffer psychological distress, as shown by the Québec Health Survey (M. Gervais, 1993; Santè Québec, 1995). The authors applied and extended the French model (F. Guérin, A. Laville, F. Daniellou, J. Duraffourg, & A. Kerguelen, 1991) of analysis of work activity to observing classroom teaching (14 women in 10 classrooms for a total of 48 hr 24 min) to identify stressful elements. The authors observed a rapid sequence of actions, eye fixations of short duration, little physical or mental relaxation, multiple simultaneous activities, and uncomfortable temperature and humidity levels. Teachers use many strategies to teach, to create a learning environment, and to maintain attention in classrooms under adverse conditions. Examination of these strategies led to recommendations to improve relations between the teachers and their supervisors and to make the classroom an easier place to teach.
PubMed ID
9552279 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal complaints in general practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178352
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2004 Sep;22(3):157-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Per Olav Vandvik
Pål Kristensen
Lars Aabakken
Per G Farup
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Innlandet Hospital Health Authority, NO-2819 Gjøvik, Norway. per.vandvic@start.no
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2004 Sep;22(3):157-62
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Workload
Abstract
The study evaluates the prevalence and diagnoses of abdominal complaints in general practice, and compares characteristics and symptoms of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and organic diseases.
A cross-sectional study.
Nine centres with 26 participating general practitioners (GPs) in Norway.
3097 out of 3369 consecutive adult patients answered a questionnaire regarding abdominal complaints IN the last 3 months. Those who consulted for the complaints were eligible for this study.
The GPs' diagnoses and patients' characteristics were reported in questionnaires.
460 out of 1499 patients with abdominal complaints consulted for these complaints; 392 were included in this study. The GPs diagnosed an FGID in 167 (42.6%) patients, organic disease in 145 (37.0%), and made no diagnosis in 80 (20.4%). Stress-related symptoms were a statistically significant predictor of a FGID (OR 1.95) and weight loss predicted in addition organic disease (OR 2.7) in 128 patients with a verified diagnosis.
Abdominal complaints are a common problem in general practice. The distinction between FGID, which accounted for half of the diagnoses, and organic disease was difficult. The only significant predictor for FGID was stress-related symptoms.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2005 Jun;23(2):126; author reply 126-716036553
PubMed ID
15370792 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abolishment of 24-hour continuous medical call duty in quebec: a quality of life survey of general surgical residents following implementation of the new work-hour restrictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114387
Source
J Surg Educ. 2013 May-Jun;70(3):296-303
Publication Type
Article
Author
Fadi T Hamadani
Dan Deckelbaum
Alexandre Sauve
Kosar Khwaja
Tarek Razek
Paola Fata
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Centre, Division of Trauma Surgery, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Surg Educ. 2013 May-Jun;70(3):296-303
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Female
General Surgery - education
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Patient Safety
Quality of Life
Quebec
Questionnaires
Work Schedule Tolerance
Workload - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The implementation of work hour restrictions across North America have resulted in decreased levels of self injury and medical errors for Residents. An arbitration ruling in Quebec has led to further curtailment of work hours beyond that proposed by the ACGME. This may threaten Resident quality of life and in turn decrease the educational quality of surgical residency training.
We administered a quality of life questionnaire with an integrated education quality assessment tool to all General Surgery residents training at McGill 6 months after the work hour restrictions.
Across several strata respondents reveal a decreased sense of educational quality and quality of life.
The arbitration argued that work- hour restrictions would be necessary to improve quality of life for trainees and hence improve patient safety. Results from this study demonstrate the exact opposite in a large majority of respondents, who report a poorer quality of life and a self-reported inability on their part to provide continuous and safe patient care.
PubMed ID
23618437 View in PubMed
Less detail

[About life, work and health problems of fishermen employed by PPP and H "Dalmor" SA., fishing at the Sea of Okhotsk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216598
Source
Med Pr. 1995;46(3):309-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

Absence of response: a study of nurses' experience of stress in the workplace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183994
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Brita Olofsson
Claire Bengtsson
Eva Brink
Author Affiliation
Northern Elvsborg County Hospital, University of Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Sweden.
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Feedback
Frustration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Models, Psychological
Morale
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation Centers
Risk factors
Sweden
Workload
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
It has become clear that nursing is a high-risk occupation with regards to stress-related diseases. In this study, we were interested in nurses' experiences of stress and the emotions arising from stress at work. Results showed that nurses experienced negative stress which was apparently related to the social environment in which they worked. Four nurses were interviewed. The method used was grounded theory. Analysis of the interviews singled out absence of response as the core category. Recurring stressful situations obviously caused problems for the nurses in their daily work. Not only did they lack responses from their supervisors, they also experienced emotions of frustration, powerlessness, hopelessness and inadequacy, which increased the general stress experienced at work. Our conclusion is that the experience of absence of response leads to negative stress in nurses.
PubMed ID
12930542 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academic and nonacademic laboratories perform equally on CIQC immunohistochemistry proficiency testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113089
Source
Am J Clin Pathol. 2013 Jul;140(1):55-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Zhongchuan Will Chen
Heather Neufeld
Maria A Copete
John Garratt
C Blake Gilks
Emina E Torlakovic
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am J Clin Pathol. 2013 Jul;140(1):55-60
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis
Canada
Data Collection
Female
Hospitals, Rural
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Immunohistochemistry - standards
Laboratories - standards
Laboratory Proficiency Testing - standards
Paraffin Embedding
Pathology - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Reproducibility of Results
Tissue Array Analysis
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Workload
Abstract
To test whether academic centers (ACs) are more successful than nonacademic centers (NACs) in immunohistochemistry (IHC) external quality assessment challenges in the Canadian Immunohistochemistry Quality Control (CIQC) program.
Results of 9 CIQC challenges for breast cancer marker (BM) and various non-breast cancer marker (NBM) tests were examined. Success rates were compared between AC/NAC laboratories and those located in small or large cities. Performance was also correlated with annual IHC case volumes.
There was no statistically significant difference in performance in any of the comparisons. However, overall performance on BM was significantly better (P
PubMed ID
23765534 View in PubMed
Less detail

1429 records – page 1 of 143.