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[Anki gave up acute care to get perspective. Interview by Carina Roxström].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228187
Source
Vardfacket. 1990 Oct 25;14(18):8-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-25-1990

Are intrinsic motivational factors of work associated with functional incapacity similarly regardless of the country?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70562
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2005 Oct;59(10):858-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
A. Väänänen
K. Pahkin
P. Huuhtanen
M. Kivimäki
J. Vahtera
T. Theorell
R. Kalimo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Department of Psychology, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FI-00250 Helsinki, Finland. Ari.Vaananen@ttl.fi
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2005 Oct;59(10):858-63
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
China
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Finland
France
Health status
Humans
Internal-External Control
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Personal Autonomy
Private Sector - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Work - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Many psychosocial models of wellbeing at work emphasise the role of intrinsic motivational factors such as job autonomy, job complexity, and innovativeness. However, little is known about whether the employees of multinational enterprises differ from country to country with regard to intrinsic motivational factors, and whether these factors are associated with wellbeing similarly in the different countries. The purpose of this study was to examine the level of intrinsic motivational factors and their impact on functional incapacity in different countries in a multinational corporation. METHODS: In 2000, data were collected from a globally operating corporation with a questionnaire survey. The participants were 13 795 employees (response rate 59%; 56% under age 45; 80% men; 61% blue collar employees), who worked in similar industrial occupations in five countries (Canada, China, Finland, France, and Sweden). RESULTS: The Chinese employees reported higher autonomy and lower complexity at work than the employees from the other countries. After adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and physical work environment, job autonomy, and job complexity at work were associated with functional incapacity in most countries, whereas in China the impact was significantly stronger. In Finland and in China employees with low innovativeness at work were more prone to functional incapacity than corresponding employees in other countries. CONCLUSIONS: The level of intrinsic motivational factors varied between the Chinese employees and those in other countries. In line with theoretical notions, the relation between intrinsic motivational factors of work and functional incapacity followed a similar pattern in the different countries. However, these country specific results show that a culture specific approach to employee wellbeing should also be applied.
PubMed ID
16166359 View in PubMed
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Assessing motivation for work environment improvements: internal consistency, reliability and factorial structure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143345
Source
J Safety Res. 2010 Apr;41(2):145-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Ann Hedlund
Mattias Ateg
Ing-Marie Andersson
Gunnar Rosén
Author Affiliation
The University Högskolan Dalarna, Borlänge, Sweden. ahd@du.se
Source
J Safety Res. 2010 Apr;41(2):145-51
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Work - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Workers' motivation to actively take part in improvements to the work environment is assumed to be important for the efficiency of investments for that purpose. That gives rise to the need for a tool to measure this motivation.
A questionnaire to measure motivation for improvements to the work environment has been designed. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the domains of the questionnaire have been measured, and the factorial structure has been explored, from the answers of 113 employees.
The internal consistency is high (0.94), as well as the correlation for the total score (0.84). Three factors are identified accounting for 61.6% of the total variance.
The questionnaire can be a useful tool in improving intervention methods.
The expectation is that the tool can be useful, particularly with the aim of improving efficiency of companies' investments for work environment improvements.
PubMed ID
20497800 View in PubMed
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Assessment of psychosocial work environment in primary care--development of a questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198928
Source
J Med Syst. 1999 Dec;23(6):447-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
S. Wilhelmsson
I. Akerlind
T. Faresjö
A C Ek
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Medicine and Care, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
J Med Syst. 1999 Dec;23(6):447-56
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Physicians, Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Primary Health Care - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Psychology, Social
Public Health Nursing - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Sweden
Work - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Recent studies have indicated deteriorated working conditions of health care personnel. To have an efficient health care organization requires good working conditions and the well-being of the personnel. Today there are no "gold-standard" assessment tools measuring psychosocial working conditions. The aim of this study was to develop two valid and reliable questionnaires, one generic and one specific, measuring psychosocial working conditions for general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses (DNs) in Sweden, with a special emphasis on organizational changes. The construction of the questionnaires were made after a stepwise developing phase including literature review, interviews, and a pilot study. The pilot study included GPs n = 42 and DNs n = 39. The questionnaires were later on used in a main study (GPs n = 465, DNs n = 465). A factor analysis was carried out and showed that there were fewer items in the main study that had factor loading > or = 0.40 in more than one factor, compared to the pilot study. The factors from the main study were easier to label and had good correspondence with other studies. After this stepwise development phase good construct validity and internal consistency were established for the questionnaire.
PubMed ID
10763164 View in PubMed
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The association between job strain and atrial fibrillation in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262656
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2015 Mar;72(3):177-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Kjell Torén
Linus Schiöler
Mia Söderberg
Kok Wai Giang
Annika Rosengren
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2015 Mar;72(3):177-80
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - etiology
Employment - psychology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Power (Psychology)
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Work - psychology
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether psychosocial stress defined as high strain based on the job demand-control model increases risk for atrial fibrillation.
The present study comprised 6035 men born between 1915 and 1925 and free from previous coronary heart disease, atrial fibrillation and stroke at baseline (1974-1977). Work-related psychosocial stress was measured using a job-exposure matrix for the job demand-control model based on occupation at baseline. The participants were followed from baseline examination until death, hospital discharge or 75 years of age, using the Swedish national register on cause of death and the Swedish hospital discharge register for any registration for atrial fibrillation, resulting in the identification of 436 cases. Data were analysed with Cox regression models with atrial fibrillation as the outcome using high strain as the explanatory variable adjusted for age, smoking, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes and socioeconomic status.
There was an increased risk for atrial fibrillation in relation to high strain (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.003 to 1.75). When the four categories of the job-strain model were included and low strain was used as reference, the risk for high strain decreased (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.82).
Exposure to occupational psychosocial stress defined as high strain may be associated with increased risk for atrial fibrillation. The observed increase in risk is small and residual confounding may also be present.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25523937 View in PubMed
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The association between sex segregation, working conditions, and sickness absence among employed women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71151
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2004 Feb;61(2):e7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
G. Hensing
K. Alexanderson
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Sahlgren Academy at University of Göteborg, Sweden. gunnel.hensing@socmed.gu.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2004 Feb;61(2):e7
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Allied Health Personnel - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Prejudice
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Social Environment
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Women's health
Women, Working - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
AIMS: To analyse the association between sickness absence and sex segregation of occupation and of work site, respectively, and to analyse work environmental factors associated with high sickness absence. METHODS: The study group consisted of 1075 women employed as nurses, assistant nurses, medical secretaries, or metal workers who answered a questionnaire comprising 218 questions on women's health and living conditions. Sickness absence was collected from employers' and social insurance registers. RESULTS: Women working in the male dominated occupation had in general higher sickness absence compared to those working in female dominated occupations. However, metal workers at female dominated work sites had 2.98 (95% CI 2.17 to 3.79) sick-leave spells per woman and year compared to 1.70 (95% CI 1.29 to 2.10) among those working with almost only men. In spite of a better physical work environment, female metal workers at a female dominated work site had a higher sickness absence than other women, which probably could be explained by the worse psychosocial work environment. Working with more women also had a positive association to increased frequency of sick-leave spells in a multivariate analysis including several known indicators of increased sick-leave. CONCLUSIONS: There was an association between sickness absence and sex segregation, in different directions at the occupational and work site level. The mechanism behind this needs to be more closely understood regarding selection in and out of an occupation and a certain work site.
PubMed ID
14739391 View in PubMed
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Associations between strain in domestic work and self-rated health: a study of employed women in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87022
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2008 Jan;36(1):21-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Staland-Nyman Carin
Alexanderson Kristina
Hensing Gunnel
Author Affiliation
Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Sweden. carin.nyman@socmed.gu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2008 Jan;36(1):21-7
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Conflict
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Housekeeping
Humans
Marriage
Mental health
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Women's health
Women, Working - psychology
Workload
Abstract
AIM: The aim of this study was to analyse the association between strain in domestic work and self-rated health among employed women in Sweden, using two different methods of measuring strain in domestic work. METHODS: Questionnaire data were collected on health and living conditions in paid and unpaid work for employed women (n=1,417), aged 17-64 years. "Domestic job strain'' was an application of the demand-control model developed by Karasek and Theorell, and "Domestic work equity and marital satisfaction'' was measured by questions on the division of and responsibility for domestic work and relationship with spouse/cohabiter. Self-rated health was measured using the SF-36 Health Survey. Associations were analysed by bivariate and multivariate linear regression analyses, and reported as standardized regression coefficients. RESULTS: Higher strain in domestic work was associated with lower self-rated health, also after controlling for potential confounders and according to both strain measures. "Domestic work equity and marital satisfaction'' showed for example negative associations with mental health beta -0.211 (p
PubMed ID
18426781 View in PubMed
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Associations between work-related stress in late midlife, educational attainment, and serious health problems in old age: a longitudinal study with over 20 years of follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265225
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:878
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Charlotta Nilsen
Ross Andel
Stefan Fors
Bettina Meinow
Alexander Darin Mattsson
Ingemar Kåreholt
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:878
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services for the Aged
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Work - psychology
Abstract
People spend a considerable amount of time at work over the course of their lives, which makes the workplace important to health and aging. However, little is known about the potential long-term effects of work-related stress on late-life health. This study aims to examine work-related stress in late midlife and educational attainment in relation to serious health problems in old age.
Data from nationally representative Swedish surveys were used in the analyses (n = 1,502). Follow-up time was 20-24 years. Logistic regressions were used to examine work-related stress (self-reported job demands, job control, and job strain) in relation to serious health problems measured as none, serious problems in one health domain, and serious problems in two or three health domains (complex health problems).
While not all results were statistically significant, high job demands were associated with higher odds of serious health problems among women but lower odds of serious health problems among men. Job control was negatively associated with serious health problems. The strongest association in this study was between high job strain and complex health problems. After adjustment for educational attainment some of the associations became statistically nonsignificant. However, high job demands, remained related to lower odds of serious problems in one health domain among men, and low job control remained associated with higher odds of complex health problems among men. High job demands were associated with lower odds of complex health problems among men with low education, but not among men with high education, or among women regardless of level of education.
The results underscore the importance of work-related stress for long-term health. Modification to work environment to reduce work stress (e.g., providing opportunities for self-direction/monitoring levels of psychological job demands) may serve as a springboard for the development of preventive strategies to improve public health both before and after retirement.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25159829 View in PubMed
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At the threshold of retirement: From all-absorbing relations to self-actualization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291504
Source
J Women Aging. 2017 Oct-Dec; 29(4):306-320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Anna Lund
Author Affiliation
a Centre for Cultural Sociology, Department of Cultural Sciences , Linnaeus University , Växjö , Sweden.
Source
J Women Aging. 2017 Oct-Dec; 29(4):306-320
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Life Style
Personal Satisfaction
Retirement - psychology
Self Concept
Social Perception
Sweden
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
To investigate the complexities of the retirement process, the present article draws on a case study of Eva, a Swedish woman who "awakened" from all-absorbing relations. It considers the ways in which retirement can enable liberation from patriarchal kinship structures and embodied values of respectability. The aim is to illuminate how deep, embodied values can become conscious and explicit during precarious life situations and transitional phases. The relation between the Swedish welfare state, an I-we balance, and gender equity values are illuminated. These analytical dimensions support the analysis by providing insights into the ways in which individuals embody and use cultural and social structures when they aim to manage unpredictability and to create change toward self-actualization.
PubMed ID
27716020 View in PubMed
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Attitude and flexibility are the most important work place factors for working parents' mental wellbeing, stress, and work engagement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112995
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Nov;41(7):692-705
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Frida Eek
Anna Axmon
Author Affiliation
1Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Nov;41(7):692-705
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Child
Child, Preschool
Conflict (Psychology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment - organization & administration - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Mental health
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden
Women, Working - psychology
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
The need to combine active employment and parenthood is a reality for many parents today. Knowing more about which work place factors are associated with better or worse health could help employers to form a work environment that provides optimal conditions to maintain or increase health and work engagement in this group. The aim of this study was to explore possible associations between different subjective and objective work factors and benefits, and a range of outcome variables such as stress, symptom report, wellbeing, work-related fatigue, work engagement, and work-family conflict among working mothers and fathers with small children.
Cross-sectional analyses of associations between work place factors categorised into three different dimensions; flexibility, benefits, and attitude and the outcome measures were performed, including questionnaire responses from 1562 working parents.
The results showed that work place factors related to flexibility and, especially among women, attitude to parenthood appear to have the strongest effect on working parents' subjective stress and wellbeing, while benefits appear to have less impact. Except regarding factors related to attitudes at the work place, most associations were similar among men and women.
Most likely, different factors are better suited or more important for some individuals than others depending on their total work, as well as family situation and also depending on individual factors such as personality and priorities. A positive attitude towards parenthood and a flexible work situation seem, however, beneficial for the general wellbeing and work engagement among working parents.
PubMed ID
23774665 View in PubMed
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91 records – page 1 of 10.