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Access to health programs at the workplace and the reduction of work presenteeism: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106463
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2013 Nov;55(11):1318-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Arnaldo Sanchez Bustillos
Oswaldo Ortiz Trigoso
Author Affiliation
From the School of Population and Public Health (Dr Bustillos), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; and Occupational Medicine Postgraduate Program (Dr Trigoso), Faculty of Medicine, Cayetano Heredia University, Lima, Peru.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2013 Nov;55(11):1318-22
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Efficiency
Female
Health promotion
Health Services Accessibility
Health Surveys
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Self Report
Sick Leave
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Work - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine access to health programs at workplace as a determinant of presenteeism among adults.
Data source was a subsample of the 2009-2010 Canadian Community Health Survey. The outcome was self-reported reduced activities at work (presenteeism). The explanatory variable was self-reported access to a health program at workplace. Logistic regression was used to measure the association between outcome and explanatory variables adjusting for potential confounders.
Adjusting for sex, age, education, income, work stress, and chronic conditions, presenteeism was not associated with having access to a health program at workplace (adjusted odds ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.91 to 1.65). The odds of presenteeism were higher in workers who reported high work stress and those with chronic medical conditions.
This study found that access to health programs at workplace is not significantly associated with a decline in presenteeism.
PubMed ID
24164761 View in PubMed
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Adverse trajectories of mental health problems predict subsequent burnout and work-family conflict - a longitudinal study of employed women with children followed over 18 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282979
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 Nov 08;16(1):384
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-08-2016
Author
Wendy Nilsen
Anni Skipstein
Evangelia Demerouti
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 Nov 08;16(1):384
Date
Nov-08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Conflict (Psychology)
Employment - psychology
Family Characteristics
Family Conflict
Fatigue - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
The long-term consequence of experiencing mental health problems may lead to several adverse outcomes. The current study aims to validate previous identified trajectories of mental health problems from 1993 to 2006 in women by examining their implications on subsequent work and family-related outcomes in 2011.
Employed women (n?=?439) with children were drawn from the Tracking Opportunities and Problems-Study (TOPP), a community-based longitudinal study following Norwegian families across 18 years. Previous identified latent profiles of mental health trajectories (i.e., High; Moderate; Low-rising and Low levels of mental health problems over time) measured at six time points between 1993 and 2006 were examined as predictors of burnout (e.g., exhaustion and disengagement from work) and work-family conflict in 2011 in univariate and multivariate analyses of variance adjusted for potential confounders (age, job demands, and negative emotionality).
We found that having consistently High and Moderate symptoms as well as Low-Rising symptoms from 1993 to 2006 predicted higher levels of exhaustion, disengagement from work and work-family conflict in 2011. Findings remained unchanged when adjusting for several potential confounders, but when adjusting for current mental health problems only levels of exhaustion were predicted by the mental health trajectories.
The study expands upon previous studies on the field by using a longer time span and by focusing on employed women with children who experience different patterns of mental health trajectories. The long-term effect of these trajectories highlight and validate the importance of early identification and prevention in women experiencing adverse patterns of mental health problems with regards to subsequent work and family-related outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27825325 View in PubMed
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[Anki gave up acute care to get perspective. Interview by Carina Roxström].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228187
Source
Vardfacket. 1990 Oct 25;14(18):8-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-25-1990

Are fatigue, depression and anxiety associated with labour market participation among patients diagnosed with haematological malignancies? A prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269147
Source
Psychooncology. 2015 Apr;24(4):408-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Trine A Horsboel
Ute Bültmann
Claus V Nielsen
Bendt Nielsen
Niels T Andersen
Annette de Thurah
Source
Psychooncology. 2015 Apr;24(4):408-15
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Fatigue - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Hematologic Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mental Fatigue - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Return to Work - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The objectives of this study are to examine levels of fatigue, depression and anxiety following diagnosis of a haematological malignancy, to determine the incidence of return to work (RTW) and long-term sickness absence (LTSA) during 1-year follow-up and to examine whether fatigue, depression and anxiety are associated with RTW and LTSA in this group of cancer patients.
Questionnaire-based data on fatigue, depression and anxiety were obtained at baseline. In all, 196 patients returned the questionnaire. Of these, 106 patients were on sick leave and 90 patients were working. They were all followed prospectively for 1 year using register-based data on labour market participation.
At baseline, high levels of fatigue, depression and anxiety were more prevalent among sickness absent patients than in those working. Half of the sickness absent patients returned to work during follow-up, and only 10 (11%) working patients experienced LTSA. Sickness absent patients with highest scores of physical fatigue were less likely to RTW than those with lowest scores (RRadj 0.43, 95% CI 0.23-0.78). Similar, we found an association between symptoms of anxiety and RTW (p?=?0.048). This association was though non-significant in multivariable analyses (p?=?0.068). No significant association was found between depression and RTW.
Half of sickness absent patients returned to work, and only a few of working patients experienced LTSA during follow-up. Patients reporting high levels of physical fatigue were less likely to RTW. There was a similar tendency for anxiety, whereas we found no association between depression and RTW. Larger prospective studies are needed.
PubMed ID
25174733 View in PubMed
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Are intrinsic motivational factors of work associated with functional incapacity similarly regardless of the country?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70562
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2005 Oct;59(10):858-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
A. Väänänen
K. Pahkin
P. Huuhtanen
M. Kivimäki
J. Vahtera
T. Theorell
R. Kalimo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Department of Psychology, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FI-00250 Helsinki, Finland. Ari.Vaananen@ttl.fi
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2005 Oct;59(10):858-63
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
China
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Finland
France
Health status
Humans
Internal-External Control
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Personal Autonomy
Private Sector - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Work - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Many psychosocial models of wellbeing at work emphasise the role of intrinsic motivational factors such as job autonomy, job complexity, and innovativeness. However, little is known about whether the employees of multinational enterprises differ from country to country with regard to intrinsic motivational factors, and whether these factors are associated with wellbeing similarly in the different countries. The purpose of this study was to examine the level of intrinsic motivational factors and their impact on functional incapacity in different countries in a multinational corporation. METHODS: In 2000, data were collected from a globally operating corporation with a questionnaire survey. The participants were 13 795 employees (response rate 59%; 56% under age 45; 80% men; 61% blue collar employees), who worked in similar industrial occupations in five countries (Canada, China, Finland, France, and Sweden). RESULTS: The Chinese employees reported higher autonomy and lower complexity at work than the employees from the other countries. After adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and physical work environment, job autonomy, and job complexity at work were associated with functional incapacity in most countries, whereas in China the impact was significantly stronger. In Finland and in China employees with low innovativeness at work were more prone to functional incapacity than corresponding employees in other countries. CONCLUSIONS: The level of intrinsic motivational factors varied between the Chinese employees and those in other countries. In line with theoretical notions, the relation between intrinsic motivational factors of work and functional incapacity followed a similar pattern in the different countries. However, these country specific results show that a culture specific approach to employee wellbeing should also be applied.
PubMed ID
16166359 View in PubMed
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Are negative aspects of social relations predictive of angina pectoris? A 6-year follow-up study of middle-aged Danish women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138427
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Apr;66(4):359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Rikke Lund
Naja Hulvej Rod
Ulla Christensen
Author Affiliation
Section of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, Postbox 2099, DK-1014 Copenhagen K, Denmark. r.lund@sund.ku.dk
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Apr;66(4):359-65
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angina Pectoris - complications - psychology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Social Class
Social Support
Unemployment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Work - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Social relations have been shown to be protective against ischaemic heart disease (IHD), but little is known about the impact of negative aspects of the social relations on IHD.
During a 6-year follow-up, the authors aimed to assess if negative aspects of social relations were associated with angina pectoris among 4573 middle-aged Danish men and women free of heart disease at baseline in 2000.
Nine per cent experienced onset of symptoms of angina pectoris. A higher degree of excessive demands or worries from the social relations was associated with increased risk of angina after adjustment for age, gender, social class, cohabitation status and depression in a dose-response manner. For example, experiencing excessive demands or worries always/often from different roles in the social relations was associated with an increased risk: partner OR=3.53 (1.68 to 7.43), children OR=2.19 (1.04 to 4.61), other family OR=1.91 (1.24 to 2.96). Except for frequent conflicts with the partner and neighbours, conflicts with the social relations was not a risk factor for angina. The authors found no interaction of negative aspects of social relations with gender, age, social class, cohabitation status or depression in terms of angina.
Excessive demands and serious worries from significant others seem to be important risk factors for development of angina pectoris.
PubMed ID
21177663 View in PubMed
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Are we ready to address the new expectations of work and workers in the transforming world of work?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117986
Source
Work. 2013 Jan 1;44(1):3-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2013
Author
Lynn Shaw
Author Affiliation
School of Occupational Therapy, 1201 Western Rd., Elborn College, London, ON, N6H 1H1, Canada. leshaw@uwo.ca
Source
Work. 2013 Jan 1;44(1):3-9
Date
Jan-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Canada
Employment - trends
Hearing loss
Humans
Middle Aged
Organizational Innovation
Persons With Hearing Impairments - statistics & numerical data
Social Change
Social Justice
Work - psychology - trends
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
PubMed ID
23247093 View in PubMed
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Assessing motivation for work environment improvements: internal consistency, reliability and factorial structure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143345
Source
J Safety Res. 2010 Apr;41(2):145-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Ann Hedlund
Mattias Ateg
Ing-Marie Andersson
Gunnar Rosén
Author Affiliation
The University Högskolan Dalarna, Borlänge, Sweden. ahd@du.se
Source
J Safety Res. 2010 Apr;41(2):145-51
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Work - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Workers' motivation to actively take part in improvements to the work environment is assumed to be important for the efficiency of investments for that purpose. That gives rise to the need for a tool to measure this motivation.
A questionnaire to measure motivation for improvements to the work environment has been designed. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the domains of the questionnaire have been measured, and the factorial structure has been explored, from the answers of 113 employees.
The internal consistency is high (0.94), as well as the correlation for the total score (0.84). Three factors are identified accounting for 61.6% of the total variance.
The questionnaire can be a useful tool in improving intervention methods.
The expectation is that the tool can be useful, particularly with the aim of improving efficiency of companies' investments for work environment improvements.
PubMed ID
20497800 View in PubMed
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Assessment of psychosocial work environment in primary care--development of a questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198928
Source
J Med Syst. 1999 Dec;23(6):447-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
S. Wilhelmsson
I. Akerlind
T. Faresjö
A C Ek
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Medicine and Care, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
J Med Syst. 1999 Dec;23(6):447-56
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Physicians, Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Primary Health Care - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Psychology, Social
Public Health Nursing - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Sweden
Work - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Recent studies have indicated deteriorated working conditions of health care personnel. To have an efficient health care organization requires good working conditions and the well-being of the personnel. Today there are no "gold-standard" assessment tools measuring psychosocial working conditions. The aim of this study was to develop two valid and reliable questionnaires, one generic and one specific, measuring psychosocial working conditions for general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses (DNs) in Sweden, with a special emphasis on organizational changes. The construction of the questionnaires were made after a stepwise developing phase including literature review, interviews, and a pilot study. The pilot study included GPs n = 42 and DNs n = 39. The questionnaires were later on used in a main study (GPs n = 465, DNs n = 465). A factor analysis was carried out and showed that there were fewer items in the main study that had factor loading > or = 0.40 in more than one factor, compared to the pilot study. The factors from the main study were easier to label and had good correspondence with other studies. After this stepwise development phase good construct validity and internal consistency were established for the questionnaire.
PubMed ID
10763164 View in PubMed
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The association between job strain and atrial fibrillation in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262656
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2015 Mar;72(3):177-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Kjell Torén
Linus Schiöler
Mia Söderberg
Kok Wai Giang
Annika Rosengren
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2015 Mar;72(3):177-80
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - etiology
Employment - psychology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Power (Psychology)
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Work - psychology
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether psychosocial stress defined as high strain based on the job demand-control model increases risk for atrial fibrillation.
The present study comprised 6035 men born between 1915 and 1925 and free from previous coronary heart disease, atrial fibrillation and stroke at baseline (1974-1977). Work-related psychosocial stress was measured using a job-exposure matrix for the job demand-control model based on occupation at baseline. The participants were followed from baseline examination until death, hospital discharge or 75 years of age, using the Swedish national register on cause of death and the Swedish hospital discharge register for any registration for atrial fibrillation, resulting in the identification of 436 cases. Data were analysed with Cox regression models with atrial fibrillation as the outcome using high strain as the explanatory variable adjusted for age, smoking, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes and socioeconomic status.
There was an increased risk for atrial fibrillation in relation to high strain (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.003 to 1.75). When the four categories of the job-strain model were included and low strain was used as reference, the risk for high strain decreased (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.82).
Exposure to occupational psychosocial stress defined as high strain may be associated with increased risk for atrial fibrillation. The observed increase in risk is small and residual confounding may also be present.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25523937 View in PubMed
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305 records – page 1 of 31.