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1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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A 6-hour working day--effects on health and well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71230
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
T. Akerstedt
B. Olsson
M. Ingre
M. Holmgren
G. Kecklund
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Organizational Innovation
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The effect of the total amount of work hours and the benefits of a shortening is frequently debated, but very little data is available. The present study compared a group (N = 41) that obtained a 9 h reduction of the working week (to a 6 h day) with a comparison group (N = 22) that retained normal work hours. Both groups were constituted of mainly female health care and day care nursery personnel. The experimental group retained full pay and extra personnel were employed to compensate for loss of hours. Questionnaire data were obtained before and 1 year after the change. The data were analyzed using a two-factor ANOVA with the interaction term year*group as the main focus. The results showed a significant interaction of year*group for social factors, sleep quality, mental fatigue, and heart/respiratory complaints, and attitude to work hours. In all cases the experimental group improved whereas the control group did not change. It was concluded that shortened work hours have clear social effects and moderate effects on well-being.
PubMed ID
14564882 View in PubMed
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A 6-year experience with urine drug testing by family service agencies in Nova Scotia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193186
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2001 Oct 1;121(3):151-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2001
Author
A D Fraser
Author Affiliation
Clinical & Forensic Toxicologist, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, 1278 Tower Road, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 2Y9. adfraser@is.dal.ca
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2001 Oct 1;121(3):151-6
Date
Oct-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Custody
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Humans
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Social Work
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - urine
Abstract
The objective of this study is to describe a urine drug-testing program implemented for parents with a history of substance abuse by family service agencies in the province of Nova Scotia, Canada. Nurse collectors went to the parents' home to obtain urine specimens under direct observation and then delivered the specimens to the toxicology laboratory or arranged shipment by courier under chain of custody. Each urine specimen was screened for cannabinoids, cocaine metabolite, opiates, amphetamines and benzodiazepines, ethyl alcohol and creatinine. All positive screening tests were confirmed by another method such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In 15,979 urine specimens collected from 1994 to 1999, the percent positive rate for one (or more) drugs/metabolites ranged from 45.6% (1994-1996) to 30.0% (1998, 1999). A total of 575 specimens (3.7%) were dilute (urine creatinine
PubMed ID
11566417 View in PubMed
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[10 years after examination: she is manager, she works part-time. Interview by Marit Fonn].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226680
Source
J Sykepleien. 1991 Mar 4;79(4):10-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-1991
Author
M. Hoel
Source
J Sykepleien. 1991 Mar 4;79(4):10-1
Date
Mar-4-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Norway
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Women's Rights
Women, Working
PubMed ID
1859715 View in PubMed
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12-mo intervention of physical exercise improved work ability, especially in subjects with low baseline work ability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258283
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Apr;11(4):3859-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Oili Kettunen
Timo Vuorimaa
Tommi Vasankari
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Exercise & Paavo Nurmi Center, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland. oili.kettunen@vierumaki.fi.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Apr;11(4):3859-69
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Oxygen - metabolism
Physical Fitness
Questionnaires
Work Capacity Evaluation
Young Adult
Abstract
This study's objective was to assess the effects of a 12-month physical exercise intervention on work ability (WAI) and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in healthy working adults.
The study group had 371 participants, of which 338 (212 women and 126 men) were allocated in the exercise group and 33 (17 women and 16 men) in the control group. The exercise group underwent a 12-month exercise program followed by a 12-month follow-up. WAI and CRF were evaluated at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, and 24 study months, in both exercise and control groups. The exercise group was divided into subgroups according to baseline WAI classifications (poor/moderate, good, excellent).
During the 12-month exercise intervention, the exercise group increased their leisure-time physical activity by 71% (p = 0.016) and improved the mean WAI by 3% and CRF by 7% (p
Notes
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Cites: Occup Med (Lond). 2000 Jan;50(1):3-1010795384
PubMed ID
24714059 View in PubMed
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A 12 year prospective study of circulatory disease among Danish shift workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82071
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;63(7):451-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Tüchsen F.
Hannerz H.
Burr H.
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. ft@ami.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;63(7):451-5
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies of the risk of heart disease after shift work reached different estimates and review authors disagree about the validity of some of the studies. A cross sectional study showed that shift workers had a higher prevalence of nearly every unfavourable work environment factor investigated. Conflicts at work and low decision latitude were more frequent among shift workers, and all-day walking or standing work and part-time jobs were more often found among female shift workers. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the risk of circulatory disease in a prospective follow up of a representative sample of gainfully employed Danes, considering known or suspected confounding factors. METHODS: A cohort of 5517 people who were gainfully employed in 1990 were followed up for all hospital treatments due to circulatory diseases (390-458, ICD-8; I00-I99, ICD-10) from 1991 to 2002 inclusive. A log linear Poisson regression model was applied to control confounding factors and calculate the relative risk for 927 men and women working nights, evenings, or other non-day shifts compared to 4579 day workers. RESULTS: Non-day workers compared to day workers had a relative risk (RR) for all circulatory diseases of 1.31 (95% CI 1.06-1.63). Without control for BMI and smoking, the RR estimate was 1.33 (95% CI 1.07-1.65). For a subgroup of workers with at least three years' seniority, the RR was 1.40 (95% CI 1.09-1.81). The population based aetiological fraction of shift work was estimated to 5%. CONCLUSION: This study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that shift work carries an excess risk of circulatory diseases.
PubMed ID
16735480 View in PubMed
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A 15-year prospective study of shift work and disability pension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93753
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tüchsen F.
Christensen K B
Lund T.
Feveile H.
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ftu@nrcwe.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Retirement
Risk Assessment - methods
Sex Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the hazard ratio for disability pension associated with shift work. METHODS: Cohorts of shift and day workers were identified in three waves of the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study and followed up for incidence of disability pension in a national register of social transfer payment. A total of 3980 female and 4025 male employees were included in the cohorts. Information about shift work status, age, smoking habits, body mass index and ergonomic work environment were updated according to responses in subsequent waves of the survey when possible. Respondents reporting shift work were classified as shift workers in the following waves as well. Respondents were followed in the register from the time of first interview and were censored at the time of their 60th birthday, emigration, death or end of follow-up (18 June 2006). The authors used the Cox proportional hazards model to estimate hazard ratios for incidence of disability pension and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The authors observed 253 new disability pensions among women and 173 among men during 56 903 and 57 886 person-years at risk respectively, Among women, shift work predicted disability after adjustment for age, general health and socioeconomic status HR 1.39 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.82). After further adjustment for body mass index, smoking habits, socioeconomic status and ergonomic exposures the association remained statistically significant HR 1.34 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.75). Shift work was not associated with disability among men. CONCLUSION: Shift work might be moderately associated with disability pension among women; however, more powerful studies are needed to establish the possible association.
PubMed ID
18198201 View in PubMed
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[15 years of social service in a specialized hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253292
Source
Vie Med Can Fr. 1974 Aug;3(8):800-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1974

20th International Symposium on Shiftwork and Working Time: biological mechanisms, recovery, and risk management in the 24-h society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124129
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2012 Jun;29(5):531-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Göran Kecklund
Lee Di Milia
John Axelsson
Arne Lowden
Torbjörn Åkerstedt
Author Affiliation
Stress Research Institute, Stockholm Unversity, Stockholm, Sweden. goran.kecklund@stress.su.se
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2012 Jun;29(5):531-6
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Congresses as topic
Humans
Light - adverse effects
Occupational Health
Risk
Risk Management
Sleep - physiology
Sweden
Work
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
This dedicated issue of Chronobiology International is devoted to the selected proceedings of the 20th International Symposium on Shift Work and Working Time held in Stockholm, Sweden, 28 June to 1 July 2011. It constitutes the fifth such issue of the journal since 2004 dedicated to the selected proceedings to the meetings of the Working Time Society. The key theme of the 20th Symposium was "Biological Mechanisms, Recovery, and Risk Management in the 24-h Society." The collection of papers of this dedicated issue represents the best of contemporary research on the effects of night and rotating shift schedules on worker health and safety. The contents cover such topics as sleep restriction, injuries, health, and performance of night work and rotating shiftwork, plus light treatment as a countermeasure against the circadian disruption of shiftwork. The majority of the papers are observational field studies, including some of large sample size, and three studies are well-designed laboratory experiments.
PubMed ID
22621348 View in PubMed
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3119 records – page 1 of 312.