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245 records – page 1 of 25.

[Women's Lib's women committee: an at-home year with children remains a cooperative work recommendation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42171
Source
Tidskr Sver Sjukskot. 1976 Oct 21;43(19):16-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-21-1976
Source
Tidskr Sver Sjukskot. 1976 Oct 21;43(19):16-7
Date
Oct-21-1976
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Employment
Family
Sweden
Women's Rights
PubMed ID
1051099 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Take it full-time!. Interview by Marit Fonn].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226679
Source
J Sykepleien. 1991 Mar 4;79(4):12-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-1991
Author
I. Stabel
Source
J Sykepleien. 1991 Mar 4;79(4):12-3
Date
Mar-4-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Norway
Women's Rights
Women, Working
PubMed ID
1859716 View in PubMed
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Women, nursing and feminism: an interview with Alice J. Baumgart, RN, PhD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239616
Source
Can Nurse. 1985 Jan;81(1):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1985
Author
A J Baumgart
Source
Can Nurse. 1985 Jan;81(1):20-2
Date
Jan-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Humans
Nursing
Women
Women's Rights
PubMed ID
3843809 View in PubMed
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[The debate on equality is important].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221279
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Apr 7;90(14):1355
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-7-1993
Author
B. Tegmark
D. Lidman
C. Berntsson
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Apr 7;90(14):1355
Date
Apr-7-1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Physicians, Women - psychology
Sweden
Women's Rights
PubMed ID
8479255 View in PubMed
Less detail

A high-priced slot in the world of work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35309
Source
World Work. 1995 May-Jun;(12):4-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
Y. Zhang
Source
World Work. 1995 May-Jun;(12):4-10
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Economics
Employment
Health Manpower
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Rights
Abstract
Since the beginning of the 1980s, female labor force participation has risen steadily in both the developing and the developed world, while economic activity rates for men have fallen. Female employment has increased even faster than the growth of the female labor force. The increase was most spectacular in countries such as Spain and the Netherlands which entered the 1980s with relatively few women in the labor force. Women now comprise almost half of the labor force in the US, Canada, and the Nordic countries. In Central and Eastern Europe, female labor seems not to have suffered more than that of men in the transition to a market economy and the recession. In developing countries, a large part of the women's labor force continues to be invisible with regard to official statistics which do not adequately reflect women's productive work in the nonmarket economy. Women's increasing economic contribution remains undervalued. Efforts must continue against inequality and discrimination for reasons of social justice and human rights, as well as in the interest of the economy and sustainable development. The growing presence of women in the labor market comes at increasing costs to themselves and to their children, segments of the population which are most vulnerable to the negative impacts of the market and structural adjustment, deteriorating working conditions, unstable or insecure earnings, and the lack of social protection.
PubMed ID
12319481 View in PubMed
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Source
Sygeplejersken. 1979 May 9;79(18):7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-9-1979
Author
I. Rosenkvist
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1979 May 9;79(18):7
Date
May-9-1979
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Employment
Female
Humans
Sex Factors
Women's Rights
PubMed ID
256304 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Nurs Que. 1985 Jul-Aug;5(5):15
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Catellier
Source
Nurs Que. 1985 Jul-Aug;5(5):15
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Male
Quebec
Spouse Abuse
Women's Rights
PubMed ID
3850441 View in PubMed
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[Women's empowerment and life expectancy at birth in Mexico].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167206
Source
Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2006 Jul;20(1):29-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Alvaro J Idrovo
Irene Casique
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Salud Poblacional, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Av. Universidad 655, Colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán, CP. 62508, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. idrovoaj@hotmail.com
Source
Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2006 Jul;20(1):29-38
Date
Jul-2006
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Mexico
Women's Rights
Abstract
To assess the effect of women's empowerment (WE) on life expectancy at birth (LEB) in the federative states of Mexico and to compare the results of measuring WE with various compound indicators that reflect, to a greater or lesser degree, an individual or population focus.
This was an ecological study conducted in Mexico's 32 federative states. We estimated the correlations between overall and sex-specific LEB on the one hand, and a measure of gender empowerment (MGE), the index of women's ability to make decisions within the household (WADH), the index of women's autonomy (IWA), income inequality, certain aspects of the physical environment, the proportion of the population who spoke an indigenous language, and the net migratory rate on the other. By using robust regressions, we studied the effect on LEB of MGE, IWA, and WADH, after mutually adjusting for other independent variables.
A very strong inverse correlation (-0.93) was found between overall LEB and factors of the physical environment linked to population vulnerability and biodiversity. Significant direct and inverse correlations were also found between LEB on the one hand and WADH, IWA, net migratory rate, the percentage of the population that spoke an indigenous language, and the Gini coefficient on the other. Multiple robust regressions showed inverse associations between MGE and LEB in women (beta: -1.44; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: -2.71 to -0.17). WAI was positively associated with LEB in men (beta: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.01 to 1.75) and women (beta: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.03 to 1.30).
The use of MGE as a surrogate for WE failed to reveal a positive effect of WE on LEB in Mexico. It is necessary to review the components that make up MGE and the relevance of using such a measure in different contexts. WAI showed a greater association with LEB and its effect was greater among men. This indicator made it possible to measure WE in Mexico and its use is recommended, as long as there are no other indicators available for capturing more effectively all the components that affect WE.
PubMed ID
17018222 View in PubMed
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Source
Nurs Que. 1993 Jan-Feb;13(1):16
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article

[The Society of Women Physicians: surprising comments in the editorial on the proposed changes of the equal opportunities legislation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196607
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Oct 18;97(42):4764
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-18-2000

245 records – page 1 of 25.