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Effect of Regular Resistance Training on Motivation, Self-Perceived Health, and Quality of Life in Previously Inactive Overweight Women: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280213
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2016;2016:3815976
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Hege Heiestad
Anne Mette Rustaden
Kari Bø
Lene A H Haakstad
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2016;2016:3815976
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Exercise - psychology
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Quality of Life - psychology
Resistance Training - methods - statistics & numerical data
Sedentary lifestyle
Treatment Outcome
Women's Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Objectives. The aim was to investigate the effects of three different types of resistance training implementation. Design. Randomized controlled trial. Methods. Inactive, overweight women (n = 143), mean BMI 31.3 ? 5.2?kg/m(2), mean age 39.9 ? 10.5 years, were randomized to one of the following groups: A (BodyPump group training), B (individual follow-up by a personal trainer), C (nonsupervised exercise), or D (controls). The intervention included 12 weeks of 45-60 minutes' full-body resistance training three sessions per week. The outcomes in this paper are all secondary outcome measures: exercise motivation, self-perceived health, and quality of life. Results. Adherence averaged 26.1 ? 10.3 of 36 prescribed sessions. After the intervention period, all three training groups (A-C) had better scores on exercise motivation (A = 43.9 ? 19.8, B = 47.6 ? 15.4, C = 48.4 ? 17.8) compared to the control group (D) (26.5 ? 18.2) (p
PubMed ID
27462608 View in PubMed
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A first-choice combined oral contraceptive influences general well-being in healthy women: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285055
Source
Fertil Steril. 2017 May;107(5):1238-1245
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Niklas Zethraeus
Anna Dreber
Eva Ranehill
Liselott Blomberg
Fernand Labrie
Bo von Schoultz
Magnus Johannesson
Angelica Lindén Hirschberg
Source
Fertil Steril. 2017 May;107(5):1238-1245
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined - therapeutic use
Depression - epidemiology - prevention & control
Double-Blind Method
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Patient Preference
Placebo Effect
Pregnancy - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Reference Values
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Women's Health - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine whether there is a causal effect of oral contraceptive (OC) treatment on general well-being and depressed mood in healthy women.
Double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled trial.
University hospital.
Three hundred and forty healthy women aged 18-35 years randomized to treatment, of whom 332 completed the data collection at follow-up evaluation.
A combined OC (150 µg levonorgestrel and 30 µg ethinylestradiol) or placebo for 3 months of treatment.
Primary outcome measures: global score of Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); secondary outcome measures: six separate dimensions of the PGWBI.
The OC treatment statistically significantly decreased general well-being compared with placebo -4.12 (95% CI, -7.18 to -1.06). Furthermore, OC decreased the following PGWBI dimensions compared with placebo: positive well-being -3.90 (95% CI, -7.78 to -0.01), self-control -6.63 (95% CI, -11.20 to -2.06), and vitality -6.84 (95% CI, -10.80 to -2.88). The effect of OC on depressive symptoms and on the PGWBI dimension depressed mood were not statistically significant.
This study demonstrates a statistically significant reduction in general well-being by a first-choice OC in comparison with placebo in healthy women. We found no statistically significant effects on depressive symptoms. A reduction in general well-being should be of clinical importance.
PubMed ID
28433366 View in PubMed
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The health of women temporary agricultural workers in Canada: a critical review of the literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125976
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Dec;43(4):68-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Kathryn Edmunds
Helene Berman
Tanya Basok
Marilyn Ford-Gilboe
Cheryl Forchuk
Author Affiliation
Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Dec;43(4):68-91
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Women's Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Among high-income countries such as Canada, there is growing dependency on "low skilled" temporary foreign workers in a variety of sectors. The purpose of this review is to critically synthesize and analyze the theoretical and empirical literature on gendered and temporary migration in the context of globalization and the health of temporary agricultural workers, particularly women in Canadian programs. While the social sciences literature contains well-developed conceptualizations of gendered migration, the research has focused on women in feminized occupations such as domestic work. Multidisciplinary searches produced only 11 research and review publications on the gendered constraints or health of temporary agricultural workers in Canada. Further investigation is needed to explore and integrate the strengths, resiliencies, and health-care needs of women migrant agricultural workers in Canada, as well as the barriers they face, within the intersecting and gendered forces of inequities at all levels: local, national, and global.
PubMed ID
22435309 View in PubMed
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History of childhood abuse, sensation seeking, and intimate partner violence under/not under the influence of a substance: a cross-sectional study in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108777
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e68027
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Weihai Zhan
Alla V Shaboltas
Roman V Skochilov
Tatiana V Krasnoselskikh
Nadia Abdala
Author Affiliation
Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e68027
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Russia
Sexual Behavior - physiology - psychology
Sexual Partners
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - physiopathology - prevention & control - psychology
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Substance-Related Disorders - physiopathology - psychology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Women's Health - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine correlates of perpetration and victimization of intimate partner violence (IPV) under and not under the influence of a substance, we conducted a study among women in Russia.
In 2011, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among patients receiving services at a clinic for sexually transmitted infections in St. Petersburg, Russia. Multinomial logistic regression was used for analysis.
Of 299 women, 104 (34.8%) and 113 (37.8%) reported a history of IPV perpetration and victimization, respectively. Nearly half (47.1%) of perpetrators and 61.1% of victims reported that the latest IPV event (perpetration and victimization, respectively) was experienced under the influence of a substance. Factors independently associated with IPV victimization under the influence of a substance were alcohol misuse and a higher number of lifetime sex partners, whereas only experience of childhood abuse (emotional and physical abuse) was independently associated with IPV victimization that did not occur under the influence of a substance. Childhood physical abuse, lower age of first sex, sensation seeking, and alcohol misuse were independently associated with IPV perpetration under the influence of a substance, while only childhood abuse (emotional and physical abuse) was independently associated with IPV perpetration that did not occur under the influence of a substance.
IPV under and not under the influence of a substance had different correlates (e.g., alcohol misuse and sensation seeking). Despite the strong association between substance use and IPV, experience of childhood abuse is an important predictor of IPV perpetration and victimization in Russia, above and beyond substance use.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23844148 View in PubMed
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The impact of socioeconomic and clinical factors on purchase of prescribed analgesics before and after hysterectomy on benign indication.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115982
Source
Clin J Pain. 2014 Jan;30(1):46-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Signe B Daugbjerg
Birgitte Brandsborg
Bent Ottesen
Finn Diderichsen
Merete Osler
Author Affiliation
*Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup †Department of Gynecology, Juliane Marie Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen ‡Danish Pain Research Center and Department of Anesthesiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus §Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Clin J Pain. 2014 Jan;30(1):46-54
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Humans
Hysterectomy - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Pain, Postoperative - epidemiology - prevention & control
Patient Preference - statistics & numerical data
Premedication - utilization
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Treatment Outcome
Women's Health - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Pelvic pain is a primary symptom of women referred for hysterectomy. This study identified risk factors for purchase of prescribed analgesics before and after hysterectomy and examined purchase changes after hysterectomy, specifically focusing on socioeconomic effects.
Nearly all Danish women (n=13,420) with a hysterectomy on benign indication between 2004 and 2006 were included in a registry-based follow-up study. Information on prescription analgesic purchase was from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Factors associated with a purchase and associations between socioeconomic factors and changes in analgesic purchase were assessed.
Analgesic purchase after hysterectomy was independently predicted by age below 35 or above 65 years, body mass index >29.9, high American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, uterus weight
PubMed ID
23446081 View in PubMed
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Lifetime number of years of menstruation as a risk index for postmenopausal endometrial cancer in the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299010
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 Oct; 97(10):1168-1177
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Oxana Gavrilyuk
Tonje Braaten
Elisabete Weiderpass
Idlir Licaj
Eiliv Lund
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT-The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 Oct; 97(10):1168-1177
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Menstruation
Middle Aged
Norway
Postmenopause
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Time Factors
Women's Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Lifetime number of years of menstruation (LNYM) reflects a woman's cumulative exposure to endogenous estrogen and can be used as a measure of the combined effect of reproductive factors related to endometrial cancer (EC) risk.
We aimed to study the association between LNYM and EC risk among postmenopausal women and calculate the population attributable fraction of EC for different LNYM categories. Our study sample consisted of 117 589 women from the Norwegian Women and Cancer (NOWAC) Study. All women were aged 30-70 years at enrollment and completed a baseline questionnaire between 1991 and 2006. Women were followed up for EC to December 2014 through linkages to national registries. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), adjusted for potential confounders.
In all, 720 women developed EC. We found a statistically significant, positive dose-response relationship between LNYM and EC, with a 9.1% higher risk for each additional year of LNYM (P for trend
PubMed ID
29782643 View in PubMed
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Obesity is a risk factor for atrial fibrillation among fertile young women: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117579
Source
Europace. 2013 Jun;15(6):781-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Deniz Karasoy
Thomas Bo Jensen
Morten Lock Hansen
Michelle Schmiegelow
Morten Lamberts
Gunnar Hilmar Gislason
Jim Hansen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Jonas Bjerring Olesen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology - post 635, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Niels Andersens Vej 65, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. dkarasoy@gmail.com
Source
Europace. 2013 Jun;15(6):781-6
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Atrial Fibrillation - mortality
Body mass index
Causality
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hyperthyroidism - mortality
Incidence
Obesity - mortality
Registries
Risk factors
Women's Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Obesity has been associated with increased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), but whether this risk is also prevalent in younger individuals is unknown. We therefore investigated the risk of AF in relation to body mass index (BMI) among young fertile women.
By cross-linkage of nationwide registers of childbirth and hospitalization, we identified 271 203 women without prior AF who gave birth in Denmark between 2004 and 2009. Body mass index (kg/m(2)) was examined as a risk factor for AF using proportional hazard models. Mean age was 30.6 years (4.7 SD) and median follow-up was 4.6 years (interquartile range 2.9-5.8). During the follow-up, 110 women were hospitalized with first-time AF; very few individuals had known risk factors for AF. Overall incidence rate of AF was 9.3 [95% confidence interval (CI): 7.7-11.2] per 100 000 person-years. According to BMI, the incidence rate of AF per 100 000 person-years was 7.4 (5.6-9.7) in normal weight (BMI: 18.5-24.9), 8.5 (5.5-13.1) in overweight (BMI: 25-29.9), 15.8 (9.3-26.7) in obese (BMI: 30-35), and 27.3 (15.5-48.1) in very obese (BMI >35) individuals. Multivariable regression analyses adjusted for age, hyperthyroidism, and previous use of beta-blockers revealed a hazard ratio of 2.04 (95% CI: 1.13-3.69) in the obese and 3.50 (1.86-6.58) in the very obese individuals compared with normal weight.
Obesity is a risk factor for AF among young and essentially healthy fertile women despite the low incidence of AF. These results may have implications for prevention of AF.
Notes
Comment In: Europace. 2013 Jun;15(6):771-223673974
PubMed ID
23284141 View in PubMed
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Patterns of missing data in ethnic minority health research: a survey project with Russian-speaking immigrant women with hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104944
Source
Res Theory Nurs Pract. 2013;27(4):276-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Amanda M Brouwer
Katie E Mosack
Angela R Wendorf
Liliya Sokolova
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Winona State University, Winona, MN 55987, USA. amanda.m.brouwer@gmail.com
Source
Res Theory Nurs Pract. 2013;27(4):276-95
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Communication Barriers
Cultural Characteristics
Data Collection - methods
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - ethnology - nursing
Minority Health - statistics & numerical data
Russia - ethnology
United States - epidemiology
Women's Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We explored cultural-level variables and their associations with missing data in a group of immigrants from the Former Soviet Union (FSU). Elderly hypertensive women (N = 105) completed a health survey. Prevalence of missing data and z scores were calculated to determine which survey items and measures were more likely to have missing data. Hierarchical linear regressions were performed to test whether cultural variables predicted the rate of missing data beyond individual variables. Culture variables associated with survey nonresponse and missing data were related to depression, anxiety, medication beliefs and practices, attitudes toward physicians, and cultural and behavioral identity. An interpretation of the patterns of missing data and strategies to reduce the likelihood of missing data in this population are discussed. Cultural norms likely influence patients' orientations toward their health care providers. Providers would do well to normalize difficulties with medical adherence and encourage patients to ask questions about such directives. We recommend that researchers consider the cultural appropriateness of survey items and consider alternative methods (i.e., qualitative designs) for culturally sensitive topics such as mental health and sexuality.
PubMed ID
24552087 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prepregnancy physical activity in relation to offspring birth weight: a prospective population-based study in Norway-The HUNT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116128
Source
J Pregnancy. 2013;2013:780180
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Silje Krogsgaard
Sigridur L Gudmundsdottir
Tom I L Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Pregnancy. 2013;2013:780180
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Weight - physiology
Body mass index
Exercise - physiology
Female
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Leisure Activities
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight - complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Time Factors
Women's Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Background. The objective was to examine the association between prepregnancy physical exercise and offspring birth weight and to assess the combined association of pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and physical exercise on birth weight. Methods. The study included 2,026 women aged 20-39 years participating in the Norwegian HUNT study and linked with the Medical Birth Registry. We calculated mean differences in birth weight and odds ratios (ORs) for a macrosomic infant (i.e., birth weight >4000?g) using linear and logistic regression analysis. Results. There was no clear association between leisure time physical exercise and mean birth weight. Women who reported no exercise had reduced risk of a macrosomic infant (OR, 0.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.4-0.9) compared to women with a high exercise level. Overweight (BMI = 25.0?kg/m(2)) was associated with an OR of 1.9 (95% CI, 1.2-2.9) for a macrosomic infant among women who reported low exercise levels, whereas the OR was 1.2 (95% CI, 0.8-1.8) among women with higher exercise levels. Conclusion. There was some evidence that women who reported no exercise before pregnancy had lower risk for a macrosomic infant than women who exercised. Pre-pregnancy BMI was positively associated with birth weight and risk of macrosomia but only among the least active women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23431451 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence, incidence and remission of urinary incontinence in women: longitudinal data from the Norwegian HUNT study (EPINCONT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261696
Source
BMC Urol. 2013;13:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Marit Helen Ebbesen
Steinar Hunskaar
Guri Rortveit
Yngvild Skaatun Hannestad
Source
BMC Urol. 2013;13:27
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Comorbidity
Female
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Pregnancy - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Remission, Spontaneous
Risk assessment
Urinary Incontinence
Women's Health - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine incidence and remission of UI as well as changes in UI prevalence in the Norwegian EPINCONT surveys.
The EPINCONT surveys were conducted in the county of Nord-Trøndelag, Norway, as part of two large cross-sectional health surveys (HUNT2 and HUNT3) in 1995 - 1997 (EPINCONT1 (E1)), and 2006 - 2008 (EPINCONT2 (E2)). EPINCONT collected information about prevalence of UI, as well as information about type and severity of UI.
A 16% relative increase in UI prevalence was found in 11 years. The women who answered E2 were significantly older, had a higher BMI and higher prevalence of diseases such as asthma, diabetes and angina compared with the women who answered E1.
Crude UI prevalence increased between the studies. Changes in known risk factors for UI such as age, BMI, weight and parity could explain some of the relative increase in prevalence, and were also found to be associated with either incidence of UI, remission of UI or both.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23721491 View in PubMed
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