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Alcohol intake and the risk of lung cancer: influence of type of alcoholic beverage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10727
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Mar 1;149(5):463-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1999
Author
E. Prescott
M. Grønbaek
U. Becker
T I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, H:S Kommunehospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Mar 1;149(5):463-70
Date
Mar-1-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Beer - adverse effects
Comparative Study
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Wine
Abstract
Alcohol consumption has been associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, but the antioxidants in wine may, in theory, provide protection. This association was studied in 28,160 men and women subjects from three prospective studies conducted in 1964-1992 in Copenhagen, Denmark. After adjustment for age, smoking, and education, a low to moderate alcohol intake (1-20 drinks per week) was not associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Men who consumed 21-41 and more than 41 drinks per week had relative risks of 1.23 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88-1.74) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.06-2.33), respectively. The risk of lung cancer differed according to the type of alcohol consumed: After abstainers were excluded, drinkers of 1-13 and more than 13 glasses of wine per week had relative risks of 0.78 (95% CI 0.63-0.97) and 0.44 (95% CI 0.22-0.86), respectively, as compared with nondrinkers of wine (p for trend = 0.002). Corresponding relative risks for beer intake were 1.09 (95% CI 0.83-1.43) and 1.36 (95% CI 1.02-1.82), respectively (p for trend = 0.01); for spirits, they were 1.21 (95% CI 0.97-1.50) and 1.46 (95% CI 0.99-2.14), respectively (p for trend = 0.02). In women, the ability to detect associations with high alcohol intake and type of beverage was limited because of a limited range of alcohol intake. The authors concluded that in men, a high consumption of beer and spirits is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, whereas wine intake may protect against the development of lung cancer.
PubMed ID
10067906 View in PubMed
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Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 May 23;98(21):2585-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-2001
Author
M N Grønbaek
T I Sørensen
D. Johansen
U. Becker
A. Gottschau
P. Schnohr
H O Hein
G. Jensen
Author Affiliation
Center for Epidemiologisk Grundforskning, Institut for Sygdomsforebyggelse, Kommunehospitalet, København. mg@ipm.hosp.dk
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 May 23;98(21):2585-8
Date
May-23-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - mortality
Beer
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Wine
Abstract
A population based cohort study investigates the association between alcohol intake and mortality from all causes, coronary heart disease and cancer. The design is prospective with baseline assessment of intake of beer, wine and spirits, smoking habits, educational level, physical activity, and body mass index and a total of 257,859 person-years follow-up on mortality. A total of 4,833 participants died, of these 1,075 from coronary heart disease and 1,552 of cancer. Compared with non-drinkers, light drinkers who avoided wine, had a relative risk of death from all causes of 0.90 (0.82-0.99) and those who drank wine had a relative risk of 0.66 (0.55-0.77). Heavy drinkers who avoided wine were at higher risk of death from all causes than were heavy drinkers who included wine in their alcohol intake. Wine drinkers had significantly lower mortality from both coronary heart disease and cancer than did non-wine drinkers (p = 0.007 and p = 0.004, respectively). In conclusion, wine intake may have a beneficial effect on all cause mortality that is additive to that of alcohol. This effect may be attributable to a reduction in death from both coronary heart disease and cancer.
PubMed ID
11433994 View in PubMed
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Frequency of alcohol use and the level of education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12325
Source
J Intern Med. 1989 Jun;225(6):417-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
B K Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
J Intern Med. 1989 Jun;225(6):417-22
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Beer
Comparative Study
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Sex Factors
Wine
Abstract
The relationships between the length of education and the frequency of alcohol use were analysed in 12,000 men and women in Troms?, Norway. Men drank beer and spirits more often than women, whereas the proportion of men and women who drank wine once a week, or more frequently, was the same (9%). Subjects with a high level of education drank all three types of alcohol more frequently than men and women with a low level of education. This was particularly true for wine (and beer for women). About 1% of men and women with less than 8 years of education stated that they drank wine at least once a week. In contrast, about one in four with more than 16 years of education drank wine weekly. The proportion of weekly beer drinkers in men with less than 8 years of education (23%) was less than half that for men with more than 16 years of education (53%). The relationship between the frequency of alcohol use and the level of education was not as strong for spirits as for wine.
PubMed ID
2746158 View in PubMed
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[How valid are self-reported intakes of beer, wine and spirits in population studies?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11051
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 May 19;159(21):3151-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-19-1997
Author
M N Grønbaek
B L Heitmann
Author Affiliation
H:S Kommunehospitalet, Institut for Sygdomsforebyggelse, Centre for Epidemilogisk Grundforskning.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 May 19;159(21):3151-4
Date
May-19-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Beer
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet Surveys
English Abstract
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Wine
Abstract
In order to compare data on intake of wine, beer and spirits from a frequency questionnaire with intake of each type of alcoholic beverage estimated from a dietary interview, a randomly selected sub-sample of 244 women and 249 men aged 35-65 years was cross-sectionally studied. The sample was a sub-sample of the Danish MONICA study. Mean outcome measure in the study was the differences in intake of beer, wine and spirits as reported by the frequency questionnaire and the diet history interview. We found an overall agreement between the two methods, with very little or no systematic variation for all three alcoholic beverages. We conclude that compared to a more time and money consuming thorough dietary interview, the traditional frequency questionnaires seem to sufficiently capture intakes of different types of alcohol. Bias in alcohol reporting by the frequency questionnaire does not seem responsible for the recently found decreased mortality among subjects with a daily intake of wine, nor the increased mortality from drinking of spirits.
Notes
Erratum In: Ugeskr Laeger 1997 Jul 7;159(28):4414
PubMed ID
9199002 View in PubMed
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Iodine content in drinking water and other beverages in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61812
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Jan;54(1):57-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
L B Rasmussen
E H Larsen
L. Ovesen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Food Research and Nutrition, Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, Soborg, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Jan;54(1):57-60
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Beer - analysis
Beverages - analysis
Comparative Study
Denmark
Food Analysis - methods
Health Food - analysis
Iodine - analysis
Milk - chemistry
Seasons
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Water - chemistry
Water Supply - analysis
Wine - analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the variation in iodine content in drinking water in Denmark and to determine the difference in iodine content between organic and non-organic milk. Further, to analyse the iodine content in other beverages. DESIGN AND SETTING: Tap water samples were collected from 41 evenly distributed localities in Denmark. Organic and non-organic milk was collected at the same time (twice summer and twice winter). Soft drinks, beers and juice were collected from different Danish producers and wine from different countries. All samples were analysed for iodine using inductively coupled mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Iodine in tap water varied from 2.1 to 30.2 microg/l; the iodine content was in general highest in the eastern part of Denmark and lowest in the western part of Denmark. Organic milk was found to have a lower iodine content than non-organic milk. CONCLUSIONS: Large geographical (and seasonal) variations in iodine concentrations were found in different beverages supplying an appreciable part of the iodine in the Danish diet. This knowledge is important when calculating the iodine intake from dietary intake studies. SPONSORSHIP: The 1991 Farmacy Foundation and Danish Veterinary and Food Administration. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2000) 54, 57-60
PubMed ID
10694773 View in PubMed
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Lead in table wines on the Swedish market.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12439
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1988 Oct-Dec;5(4):645-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Jorhem
P. Mattsson
S. Slorach
Author Affiliation
Food Research Department, Swedish National Food Administration, Uppsala.
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1988 Oct-Dec;5(4):645-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Comparative Study
Diet
Humans
Lead - administration & dosage - analysis
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Sweden
Wine - analysis
Abstract
The levels of lead in 67 different table wines on the Swedish market in 1982 and 1986 have been determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The mean level found was 73 micrograms/l (range 16-170 micrograms/l). Little difference was found between the levels in red, white and rosé wines (mean levels 76, 75 and 65 micrograms/l, ranges 16-120, 34-170 and 35-120 micrograms/l respectively). The average daily dietary intake of lead by adults in Sweden has been estimated to be about 30 micrograms, excluding any contribution from wines and spirits. The average adult per capita consumption of wine is about 45 ml per day. This would thus give an additional intake of about 3 micrograms of lead and the intake of lead could be doubled by consuming half a litre of wine daily.
PubMed ID
3192015 View in PubMed
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[Mortality differences associated with moderate consumption of beer, wine and spirits]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11247
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Apr 15;158(16):2258-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1996
Author
M N Grønbaek
A. Deis
T I Sørensen
P U Becker
P. Schnohr
G B Jensen
Author Affiliation
Institut for sygdomsforebyggelse, center for epidemiologisk grundforskning, Kommunehospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Apr 15;158(16):2258-61
Date
Apr-15-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Beer
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Cerebrovascular Disorders - etiology - mortality
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Wine
Abstract
In a prospective population study of 7,234 women and 6,051 men aged 30-79 years, information on beer, wine, spirits and tobacco consumption, and on education, income and body mass index were assessed in the period 1976-1978, and the population was followed until 1.1.1988 for mortality. With increasing intake, the wine-mortality risk function steadily decreased from a relative risk of 1.00 for those who never drank wine through 0.51 (95% confidence limits; 0.32-0.81) among those who drank three to five glasses per day. In contrast, neither beer nor spirits consumption was associated with reduced risk. For spirits consumption the relative risk of dying increased from 1.00 among those who never drank to 1.34 (1.05-1.71) among those with an intake of 3-5 drinks per day. Wine drinking showed the same relation to risk of death from cardio- and cerebrovascular disease as to mortality from all causes.
PubMed ID
8650800 View in PubMed
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[The development of alcohol consumption]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13331
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Jun 12;71(24):2455-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-1974
Author
R. Hermansson
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Jun 12;71(24):2455-8
Date
Jun-12-1974
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Beer
Comparative Study
Europe
Humans
Sweden
United States
Wine
PubMed ID
4840617 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The influence of six alcoholic beverages on ethanol concentration in the blood and breath]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9014
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Jan 30;168(5):470-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2006
Author
Henrik Hey
Peter Haslund-Vinding
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk Afdeling, Vejle Sygehus, DK-7100 Vejle. henhey@vgs.vejleamt.dk.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Jan 30;168(5):470-5
Date
Jan-30-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholic Beverages
Area Under Curve
Beer
Biological Availability
Breath Tests
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Ethanol - analysis - blood - pharmacokinetics
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Male
Time Factors
Wine
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: We investigated the area under the curve (AUC) as a measure of the bioavailability of ethanol in healthy volunteers drinking six alcoholic beverages of different types. Furthermore, we investigated the correlation between the ethanol concentration in the blood and the breath test. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve healthy volunteers (seven females, five males) consumed six drinks of different types in a crossover design after a six-hour fast. The men ingested 36 g of ethanol and the women 24 g.Venous blood was obtained for determination of serum ethanol and glucose concentration at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 minutes postdosing, and at the same time a breath alcohol test was done using an alcoholometer. RESULTS: The AUC of ethanol differed significantly between pure ethanol and the three beverages red wine, sparkling wine and Smirnoff Ice (p or = 0.5% showed a negative (false negative). DISCUSSION: This investigation shows that the type of alcoholic beverage consumed determines the amount of alcohol absorbed. Furthermore, the different drinks caused different changes in the glucose and insulin concentrations, which might be important in connection with alcohol-induced disturbances in carbohydrate metabolism (e.g., hypo- and hyperglycaemia). Our data indicate that the alcoholometer breath test was an acceptable screening method to estimate the blood alcohol level and to measure the amount of ethanol ingested. However, for evidental purposes during prosecution of drunk drivers, more sophisticated breath test instruments are desirable.
PubMed ID
16472436 View in PubMed
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Type of alcohol and mortality from cardiovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10585
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 1999 Sep-Oct;37(9-10):921-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, H:S Kommunehospitalet.
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 1999 Sep-Oct;37(9-10):921-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholic Beverages
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Hawaii - epidemiology
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Life Style
Protective Agents
Wine
Abstract
Many epidemiological studies have described a U-shaped relation between alcohol intake and all-cause mortality (Boffetta and Garfinkel, 1990; Fuchs et al., 1995; Gronbaek et al., 1994; Marmot et al., 1981). Most researchers attribute the 'U' to a combination of beneficial and harmful effects of ethanol itself. It has, on the other hand, been explained as an artefact due to misclassification or confounding (Shaper et al., 1998). Most of the studies of the effect of total alcohol intake have found that the descending leg of the curve mainly is attributable to death from cardiovascular disease (Rimm et al., 1991; Stampfer et al., 1988). Until recently, most studies addressed the effect of the three beverages taken together as ethanol. Studies of the correlation between wine intake per capita in different countries and incidence of ischaemic heart disease gave rise to the hypothesis that there is a a more beneficial effect of wine than of beer and spirits. Leger et al., Renaud and de Lorgeril and later Criqui and Rigel found an inverse relation between incidence rates of ischemic heart disease and wine consumption in different countries, but no such relation for the other types of beverages (Criqui and Rigel, 1994; Leger et al., 1979; Renaud and de Logeril, 1992).
PubMed ID
10541445 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.