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Age, period and cohort effects on time trends in alcohol consumption in the Swedish adult population 1979-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269107
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 May;50(3):319-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Ludwig Kraus
Mimmi Eriksson Tinghög
Annette Lindell
Alexander Pabst
Daniela Piontek
Robin Room
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 May;50(3):319-27
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Effect
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
In Sweden, alcohol abstention has increased over the last 20 years and consumption has recently decreased after a peak in 2004. To understand the dynamics of these trends the present study aims at estimating age, period and cohort (APC) effects on trends in alcohol use prevalence as well as overall and beverage-specific volume of drinking over the last three decades.
APC analysis of seven cross-sectional surveys from 1979 to 2011 was conducted using cross-classified random effects models (CCREMs) by gender. The nationally representative samples comprised 77,598 respondents aged 16-80 years. Outcome measures were 30-day prevalence of alcohol use and overall as well as beverage-specific alcohol volume.
Trends in prevalence, overall and beverage-specific volume were significantly affected by APC. The period effects of prevalence and overall volume show a small decline after an increase up to the year 2005. Mean beer and wine volume levelled off after a peak in 2005 and volume of spirits drinking decreased constantly. Predicted alcohol prevalence rates in male cohorts (1945-1985) remained generally at the same level, while they declined in post-World War II female generations. Results point to high overall and beverage-specific consumption among cohorts born in the 1940s, 1950s and 1980s.
High consuming cohorts of the 1940-1950s were key in rising consumption up to 2005. Progression through the life course of these cohorts, a decrease in prevalence and drinking volume in successive cohorts seem to have contributed to the recent downward trend in alcohol use in Sweden.
PubMed ID
25743087 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and cancer of the colon and rectum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11664
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1993 Sep;2(5):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
A. Romelsjö
M. Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Psychiatry, St. Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1993 Sep;2(5):401-8
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - pathology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The association between alcohol intake and colorectal cancer was examined in a population-based case-control study performed in Stockholm in 1986-88. The study included 352 cases of colon cancer, 217 cases of rectal cancer, and 512 controls. Relative risks, with 95% confidence intervals, were calculated for total alcohol intake and for different alcoholic beverages. Total alcohol intake (> or = 30 g 100% ethanol per day) was not associated with colon cancer (relative risk = 0.9, confidence intervals = 0.4-1.8) or rectal cancer (1.0, 0.4-2.1). There was no evidence supporting beverage specificity (for colorectal cancer and > or = 10 g 100% ethanol per day: beer 1.1, 0.6-2.0, wine 1.0, 0.4-2.7, spirits 1.0, 0.6-1.6). The associations did not vary according to gender or site within the large bowel. These analyses were adjusted for year of birth and gender (when appropriate). Further adjustments for diet, body mass or physical activity had little or no influence on the results. The present study does not support the hypothesis that alcohol plays an important role in the aetiology of cancer of the colon and rectum in a population with a relatively low alcohol intake.
PubMed ID
8401175 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption, types of alcoholic beverages and risk of venous thromboembolism - the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134175
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2011 Aug;106(2):272-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Ida J Hansen-Krone
Sigrid K Brækkan
Kristin F Enga
Tom Wilsgaard
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Hematological research group in Tromsø (HERG), Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. ida.j.hansen-krone@uit.no
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2011 Aug;106(2):272-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Beer
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - etiology - prevention & control
Wine
Abstract
Moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to protect against cardiovascular diseases. The association between alcohol consumption, especially types of alcoholic beverages, and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is less well described. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of alcohol consumption and different alcoholic beverages on risk of VTE. Information on alcohol consumption was collected by a self-administrated questionnaire in 26,662 subjects, aged 25-97 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study, in 1994-1995. Subjects were followed through September 1, 2007 with incident VTE as the primary outcome. There were 460 incident VTE-events during a median of 12.5 years of follow-up. Total alcohol consumption was not associated with risk of incident VTE. However, subjects consuming = 3 units of liquor per week had 53% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotalers in analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, cancer, previous cardiovascular disease, physical activity and higher education (HR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.00-2.33). Contrary, subjects with a wine intake of = 3 units/week had 22% reduced risk of VTE (HR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.47-1.30), further adjustment for liquor and beer intake strengthened the protective effect of wine (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.30-1.00). Frequent binge drinkers (= 1/week) had a 17% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotallers (HR 1.17, 95% CI: 0.66-2.09), and a 47% increased risk compared to non-binge drinkers (HR 1.47, 95% CI: 0.85-2.54). In conclusion, liquor consumption and binge drinking was associated with increased risk of VTE, whereas wine consumption was possibly associated with reduced risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
21614415 View in PubMed
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Amount and type of alcohol and risk of dementia: the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9873
Source
Neurology. 2002 Nov 12;59(9):1313-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-12-2002
Author
Thomas Truelsen
Dorte Thudium
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Kommunehospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. truelsen@post3.tele.dk
Source
Neurology. 2002 Nov 12;59(9):1313-9
Date
Nov-12-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Beer
Case-Control Studies
Central Nervous System Depressants - therapeutic use
Dementia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Denmark - epidemiology
Ethanol - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Wine
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess whether amount or type of alcohol is associated with risk of dementia. Methods and subjects: Case-control nested in a cohort study among participants in the third Copenhagen City Heart Study (1991 to 1994), aged 65 years or more, who where screened using the Mini-Mental State Examination and subsequently examined for dementia. There were 83 subjects diagnosed with dementia and the remaining 1,626 nondemented subjects were included as controls. The two groups were compared with regard to alcohol intake and type of alcohol assessed 15 years before. RESULTS: Average weekly total alcohol intake had no significant effect on risk of dementia. Monthly and weekly intake of wine was significantly associated with a lower risk of dementia. For beer and spirits, only a monthly intake of beer was significantly associated with an increased risk of dementia. The effect of alcohol on risk of dementia did not differ between men and women. CONCLUSIONS: Monthly and weekly intake of wine is associated with a lower risk of dementia. The results do not indicate that people should start drinking or increase wine consumption to avoid dementia, but instead suggest that certain substances in wine may reduce the occurrence of dementia.
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2002 Nov 12;59(9):1300-112427873
PubMed ID
12427876 View in PubMed
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Amount and type of alcohol consumption and missing teeth among community-dwelling older adults: findings from the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127155
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karen Heegaard
Kirsten Avlund
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Allan Bardow
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. karen.heegaard@mail.tele.dk
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - classification - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Population Surveillance
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study if an association between total weekly intake of alcohol, type-specific weekly alcohol intake, alcoholic beverage preference, and the number of teeth among older people exists.
A cross-sectional study including a total of 783 community-dwelling men and women aged 65-95 years who were interviewed about alcohol drinking habits and underwent a clinical oral and dental examination. Multiple regression analyses were applied for studying the association between total weekly alcohol consumption, beverage-specific alcohol consumption, beverage preference (defined as the highest intake of one beverage type compared with two other types), and the number of remaining teeth (= 20 versus >20 remaining teeth).
The odds ratio (OR) of having a low number of teeth decreased with the total intake of alcohol in women, with ORs for a low number of teeth of 0.40 [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.76] in women drinking 1-14 drinks per week and 0.34 (95 percent CI 0.16-0.74) in women with an intake of more than 14 drinks per week compared with abstainers. Similar relations could also be obtained for type-specific alcohol intake of wine and for wine and spirits preference among women. Men who preferred beer showed a decreased risk for a low number of teeth compared with men with other alcohol preferences.
In this study, alcohol consumption, wine drinking, and wine and spirits preference among women were associated with a higher number of teeth compared with abstainers. Among men, those who preferred beer also had a higher number of teeth.
PubMed ID
22320290 View in PubMed
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Apparent risk factors for chronic and acute pancreatitis in Stockholm county. Spirits but not wine and beer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12073
Source
Int J Pancreatol. 1991 Jan;8(1):45-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1991
Author
D N Schmidt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Sabbatsberg's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Pancreatol. 1991 Jan;8(1):45-50
Date
Jan-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages
Beer
Child
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Liver diseases, alcoholic - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine
Abstract
In Stockholm county, the incidences of hospitalizations for chronic pancreatitis, acute, nongallstone associated pancreatitis, and alcoholic liver disease peaked at 14.1, 40.1, and 24.3/100,000 population in 1974 for the first two conditions, and in 1979 for the last one. After the peaks, a steady decline was seen for each condition. Furthermore, the apparent national and Stockholm prevalence of chronic pancreatitis displayed a decline during 1971-1987. A concomitant decline in the Stockholm sales figures of distilled spirits from 9.2 to 5.4 1/person/yr was also observed, whereas the sales figures for wine and beer increased, leaving the overall alcohol purchase unchanged. Thus, the consumption of distilled spirits, but not that of wine and beer, appear as a risk factor for these diseases in Stockholm county.
PubMed ID
2033318 View in PubMed
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Beer, wine, spirits and subjective health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10529
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 Nov;53(11):721-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
M. Grønbaek
E L Mortensen
K. Mygind
A T Andersen
U. Becker
C. Gluud
T I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 Nov;53(11):721-4
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - trends
Alcoholic Beverages
Beer
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Wine
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between intake of different types of alcoholic beverages and self reported subjective health. DESIGN: Cross sectional health survey with assessment of intake of beer, wine and spirits (at last non-weekend day), smoking habits, social networks, physical activity, body mass index, educational level, presence of chronic disease, and self reported health. SETTING: WHO Copenhagen Healthy City Survey, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 4113 men and 7926 women aged 18 to 100 years. MAIN RESULTS: Of the 12,039 subjects, 8680 reported their health as optimal, and 3359 reported a suboptimal health. After controlling for the covariates, the relation between total alcohol intake and the proportion reporting suboptimal health was J shaped. Heavy drinkers of any of the three types of alcoholic beverages had a higher prevalence of suboptimal health than non-drinkers. However, only light (1-2 glasses of wine yesterday) and moderate (3-5) wine drinkers had significantly lower odds ratios for suboptimal health--0.72 (95% confidence limits; 0.56 to 0.92) and 0.65 (0.49 to 0.87), respectively--when compared with non-wine drinkers. Moderate beer or spirits drinkers did not differ significantly from non-drinkers of these beverages with regard to prevalence of suboptimal health. Consistently, beer preference drinkers had an odds ratio of 1.50 (1.25 to 1.80) for suboptimal health compared with wine preference drinkers. CONCLUSIONS: A light to moderate wine intake is related to good self perceived health, whereas this is not the case for beer and spirits. The causal relations creating this association are unknown and should be considered when interpreting the relation between different types of alcoholic beverages and subsequent morbidity and mortality.
PubMed ID
10656102 View in PubMed
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Long term alcohol intake and risk of rheumatoid arthritis in women: a population based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122718
Source
BMJ. 2012;345:e4230
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Daniela Di Giuseppe
Lars Alfredsson
Matteo Bottai
Johan Askling
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Box 210, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMJ. 2012;345:e4230
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology
Beer
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine
Abstract
To analyse the association between alcohol intake and incidence of rheumatoid arthritis in women.
Prospective cohort study with repeated measurements.
The Swedish Mammography Cohort, a population based cohort from central Sweden.
34,141 women born between 1914 and 1948, followed up from 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2009.
Newly diagnosed cases of rheumatoid arthritis identified by linkage with two Swedish national registers. Data on alcohol consumption were collected in 1987 and 1997.
During the follow-up period (226,032 person years), 197 incident cases of rheumatoid arthritis were identified. There was a statistically significant 37% decrease in risk of rheumatoid arthritis among women who drank >4 glasses of alcohol (1 glass = 15 g of ethanol) per week compared with women who drank 3 glasses of alcohol per week in both 1987 and 1997 had a 52% decreased risk of rheumatoid arthritis compared with those who never drank (relative risk 0.48 (0.24 to 0.98)).
Moderate consumption of alcohol is associated with reduced risk of rheumatoid arthritis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22782847 View in PubMed
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Population based cohort study of the association between alcohol intake and cancer of the upper digestive tract.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10825
Source
BMJ. 1998 Sep 26;317(7162):844-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-26-1998
Author
M. Grønbaek
U. Becker
D. Johansen
H. Tønnesen
G. Jensen
T I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Kommunehospitalet, 1399 Copenhagen K, Denmark. mg@ipm.hosp.dk
Source
BMJ. 1998 Sep 26;317(7162):844-7
Date
Sep-26-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Beer - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Esophageal Neoplasms - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oropharyngeal Neoplasms - etiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Wine - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation between different types of alcoholic drinks and upper digestive tract cancers (oropharyngeal and oesophageal). DESIGN: Population based study with baseline assessment of intake of beer, wine, and spirits, smoking habits, educational level, and 2-19 years' follow up on risk of upper digestive tract cancer. SETTING: Denmark. SUBJECTS: 15 117 men and 13 063 women aged 20 to 98 years. Main outcome measure: Number and time of identification of incident upper digestive tract cancer during follow up. RESULTS: During a mean follow up of 13.5 years, 156 subjects developed upper digestive tract cancer. Compared with non-drinkers (drinkers of =30% of their intake had a risk of 0.5 (0.2 to 1.4). Drinkers of >21 beers and spirits but no wine had a relative risk of 5.2 (2.7 to 10.2) compared with non-drinkers, whereas those who drank the same amount, but included wine in their alcohol intake, had a relative risk of 1.7 (0.6 to 4. 4). CONCLUSION: A moderate intake of wine probably does not increase the risk of upper digestive tract cancer, whereas a moderate intake of beer or spirits increases the risk considerably.
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 1998 Sep 26;317(7162):8279748168
Comment In: BMJ. 1999 May 8;318(7193):1289-90; author reply 129110231282
Comment In: BMJ. 1999 May 8;318(7193):1290; author reply 129110391706
Comment In: BMJ. 1999 May 8;318(7193):1290; author reply 219110391707
Comment In: BMJ. 1999 May 8;318(7193):129110391708
PubMed ID
9748175 View in PubMed
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Relations between amount and type of alcohol and colon and rectal cancer in a Danish population based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9728
Source
Gut. 2003 Jun;52(6):861-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
A. Pedersen
C. Johansen
M. Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen Hospital Corporation, Denmark.
Source
Gut. 2003 Jun;52(6):861-7
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Beer - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Wine
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There may be a weak association between total alcohol intake and colorectal cancer but the effect of different types of alcohol and effect on colon subsites have not been investigated satisfactorily. AIMS: To investigate the relationship between amount and type of alcohol and the risk of colon and rectal cancer. SUBJECTS: A population based cohort study with baseline assessment of weekly intake of beer, wine, and spirits, smoking habits, body mass index, educational level, and leisure time physical activity in Copenhagen, Denmark. The study included a random sample of 15 491 men and 13 641 women, aged 23-95 years. Incident cases of colorectal cancer were identified in the nationwide Danish Cancer Register. RESULTS: During a mean follow up of 14.7 years, we observed 411 colon cancers and 202 rectal cancers. We observed a dose-response relationship between alcohol and rectal cancer. Drinkers of more than 41 drinks a week had a relative risk of rectal cancer of 2.2 (95% confidence limits 1.0-4.6) compared with non-drinkers. Drinkers of more than 14 drinks of beer and spirits a week, but not wine, had a risk of 3.5 (1.8-6.9) of rectal cancer compared with non-drinkers, while those who drank the same amount of alcohol but including more than 30% of wine had a risk of 1.8 (1.0-3.2) of rectal cancer. No relation between alcohol and colon cancer was found when investigating the effects of total alcohol, beer, wine, and spirits, and percentage of wine of total alcohol intake. CONCLUSION: Alcohol intake is associated with a significantly increased risk of rectal cancer but the risk seems to be reduced when wine is included in the alcohol intake.
Notes
Comment In: Gut. 2004 Jan;53(1):155-614684595
PubMed ID
12740343 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.