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119 records – page 1 of 12.

The 16% solution and other mysteries concerning the accuracy of alcohol consumption estimates based on sales data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247149
Source
Br J Addict Alcohol Other Drugs. 1979 Jun;74(2):165-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1979
Author
E. Single
N. Giesbrecht
Source
Br J Addict Alcohol Other Drugs. 1979 Jun;74(2):165-73
Date
Jun-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Beverages
Commerce
Drug Utilization
Humans
Ontario
Records as Topic
Wine
PubMed ID
287509 View in PubMed
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The 1978 strike at the Norwegian Wine and Spirits Monopoly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12888
Source
Br J Addict. 1983 Mar;78(1):51-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1983

Age, period and cohort effects on time trends in alcohol consumption in the Swedish adult population 1979-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269107
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 May;50(3):319-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Ludwig Kraus
Mimmi Eriksson Tinghög
Annette Lindell
Alexander Pabst
Daniela Piontek
Robin Room
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 May;50(3):319-27
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Effect
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
In Sweden, alcohol abstention has increased over the last 20 years and consumption has recently decreased after a peak in 2004. To understand the dynamics of these trends the present study aims at estimating age, period and cohort (APC) effects on trends in alcohol use prevalence as well as overall and beverage-specific volume of drinking over the last three decades.
APC analysis of seven cross-sectional surveys from 1979 to 2011 was conducted using cross-classified random effects models (CCREMs) by gender. The nationally representative samples comprised 77,598 respondents aged 16-80 years. Outcome measures were 30-day prevalence of alcohol use and overall as well as beverage-specific alcohol volume.
Trends in prevalence, overall and beverage-specific volume were significantly affected by APC. The period effects of prevalence and overall volume show a small decline after an increase up to the year 2005. Mean beer and wine volume levelled off after a peak in 2005 and volume of spirits drinking decreased constantly. Predicted alcohol prevalence rates in male cohorts (1945-1985) remained generally at the same level, while they declined in post-World War II female generations. Results point to high overall and beverage-specific consumption among cohorts born in the 1940s, 1950s and 1980s.
High consuming cohorts of the 1940-1950s were key in rising consumption up to 2005. Progression through the life course of these cohorts, a decrease in prevalence and drinking volume in successive cohorts seem to have contributed to the recent downward trend in alcohol use in Sweden.
PubMed ID
25743087 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and cancer of the colon and rectum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11664
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1993 Sep;2(5):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
A. Romelsjö
M. Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Psychiatry, St. Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1993 Sep;2(5):401-8
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - pathology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The association between alcohol intake and colorectal cancer was examined in a population-based case-control study performed in Stockholm in 1986-88. The study included 352 cases of colon cancer, 217 cases of rectal cancer, and 512 controls. Relative risks, with 95% confidence intervals, were calculated for total alcohol intake and for different alcoholic beverages. Total alcohol intake (> or = 30 g 100% ethanol per day) was not associated with colon cancer (relative risk = 0.9, confidence intervals = 0.4-1.8) or rectal cancer (1.0, 0.4-2.1). There was no evidence supporting beverage specificity (for colorectal cancer and > or = 10 g 100% ethanol per day: beer 1.1, 0.6-2.0, wine 1.0, 0.4-2.7, spirits 1.0, 0.6-1.6). The associations did not vary according to gender or site within the large bowel. These analyses were adjusted for year of birth and gender (when appropriate). Further adjustments for diet, body mass or physical activity had little or no influence on the results. The present study does not support the hypothesis that alcohol plays an important role in the aetiology of cancer of the colon and rectum in a population with a relatively low alcohol intake.
PubMed ID
8401175 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and mortality from all causes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9376
Source
Biol Res. 2004;37(2):183-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Serge Renaud
Dominique Lanzmann-Petithory
René Gueguen
Pascale Conard
Author Affiliation
Emile Roux Hospital, Public Assistance of Paris Hospitals France. serge.renaud@erx.ap-hop-paris.fr
Source
Biol Res. 2004;37(2):183-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Beer
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Wine
Abstract
A large number of prospective studies have observed an inverse relationship between a moderate intake of alcohol and coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality. Concerning death from all-causes, results are not unanimous. Alcohol intake was associated with a protection of all-cause mortality in England and USA physicians and the large study of the American Cancer Society. None of these studies separated the effects of different alcoholic beverages. In our prospective studies in France on 35 000 middle-aged men, we observed that only wine at moderate intake, was associated with a protective effect on all-cause mortality. The reason was that in addition to the known effect on cardiovascular diseases, a very moderate intake of wine, protected also from cancer and other causes as confirmed by Gronbaek in Denmark. Our recent results also indicate that the protective effect of a moderate intake of wine on all-cause mortality is observed at all levels of blood pressure and serum cholesterol.
PubMed ID
15455645 View in PubMed
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Alcohol beverage drinking, diet and body mass index in a cross-sectional survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208609
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997 May;51(5):326-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
S. Männistö
K. Uusitalo
E. Roos
M. Fogelholm
P. Pietinen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Nutrition, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997 May;51(5):326-32
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Body mass index
Carotenoids - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Sex Characteristics
Smoking
Wine
Abstract
The study was carried out to determine the associations of alcohol beverage drinking with macronutrients, antioxidants, and body mass index.
Dietary subsample of the 1992 Finmonica cardiovascular risk factor survey in Finland; a cross-sectional study.
985 women and 863 men were drawn from the population register in the four monitoring areas. All subjects were 25-64 y of age.
The mailed questionnaire included questions covering socioeconomic factors, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption. The diet was assessed using a three-day food record.
The dietary differences between abstainers and alcohol consumers were more significant than between consumers of different alcoholic beverages. Among drinkers, fat intake as a percentage of energy was higher and carbohydrate intake was lower than among abstainers. Those who preferred wine, however, had the highest vitamin C intake; female wine drinkers also had the highest carotenoid intake. With the exception of those who mainly preferred spirits, alcohol energy was not added to the diet but seemed to substitute food items both in men and women. Despite the similar total daily energy intakes, daily energy expenditure, and physical activity index, male drinkers were leaner than abstainers. In women, the proportion of underreporters of energy intake increased with increasing alcohol consumption, and the association between alcohol and body mass index was similar to that in men after the exclusion of underreporters.
Alcohol consumers were leaner than abstainers, and wine drinkers in particular had more antioxidants in their diet.
PubMed ID
9152684 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption among middle-aged women: a population-based study of Swedish women. The Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9571
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2004;10(1):15-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Jenny Cederfjäll
Jonas Lidfeldt
Christina Nerbrand
Göran Samsioe
Agneta Ojehagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jenny.cederfjall@psykiatr.lu.se
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2004;10(1):15-21
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Mathematical Computing
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Somatoform Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Wine
Abstract
From a total population of 10,766 Swedish 50- to 59-year-old women, 6,917 (64.2%) participated in the Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) study, and among them 6,623 (95.7%) answered the questions on alcohol consumption. One out of 4 women (26.0%) consumed no alcohol in an ordinary week (non-drinkers), 57.4% consumed not more than 83 g alcohol, 12.5% consumed 84-167 g and 4.2% consumed 168 g or more. The weekly drinkers had a median consumption of 40.0 g alcohol (range 2.5-1,036.0) and the main sort of alcohol was wine. Comparing the four drinking groups, most differences occurred between the non-drinking and the weekly drinking women. The non-drinkers had lower socio-demographic status, poorer health and more symptoms, especially physical symptoms. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, most associations between non-drinking and lower socio-demographic status remained.
PubMed ID
14665801 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and fecundability: prospective Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281352
Source
BMJ. 2016 Aug 31;354:i4262
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-31-2016
Author
Ellen M Mikkelsen
Anders H Riis
Lauren A Wise
Elizabeth E Hatch
Kenneth J Rothman
Heidi T Cueto
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Source
BMJ. 2016 Aug 31;354:i4262
Date
Aug-31-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Coitus
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fertility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Rate
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
 To investigate to what extent alcohol consumption affects female fecundability.
 Prospective cohort study.
 Denmark, 1 June 2007 to 5 January 2016.
 6120 female Danish residents, aged 21-45 years, in a stable relationship with a male partner, who were trying to conceive and not receiving fertility treatment.
 Alcohol consumption was self reported as beer (330 mL bottles), red or white wine (120 mL glasses), dessert wine (50 mL glasses), and spirits (20 mL) and categorized in standard servings per week (none, 1-3, 4-7, 8-13, and =14). Participants contributed menstrual cycles at risk until the report of pregnancy, start of fertility treatment, loss to follow-up, or end of observation (maximum 12 menstrual cycles). A proportional probability regression model was used to estimate fecundability ratios (cycle specific probability of conception among exposed women divided by that among unexposed women).
 4210 (69%) participants achieved a pregnancy during follow-up. Median alcohol intake was 2.0 (interquartile range 0-3.5) servings per week. Compared with no alcohol consumption, the adjusted fecundability ratios for alcohol consumption of 1-3, 4-7, 8-13, and 14 or more servings per week were 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.91 to 1.03), 1.01 (0.93 to 1.10), 1.01 (0.87 to 1.16) and 0.82 (0.60 to 1.12), respectively. Compared with no alcohol intake, the adjusted fecundability ratios for women who consumed only wine (=3 servings), beer (=3 servings), or spirits (=2 servings) were 1.05 (0.91 to1.21), 0.92 (0.65 to 1.29), and 0.85 (0.61 to 1.17), respectively. The data did not distinguish between regular and binge drinking, which may be important if large amounts of alcohol are consumed during the fertile window.
 Consumption of less than 14 servings of alcohol per week seemed to have no discernible effect on fertility. No appreciable difference in fecundability was observed by level of consumption of beer and wine.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27581754 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and risk of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes development in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131295
Source
Diabet Med. 2012 Apr;29(4):441-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
M. Cullmann
A. Hilding
C-G Östenson
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Diabet Med. 2012 Apr;29(4):441-52
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Beer - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - chemically induced - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ethanol - adverse effects
Female
Glucose Intolerance
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prediabetic State - chemically induced - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine - adverse effects
Abstract
Alcohol is a potential risk factor of Type 2 diabetes. However, more detailed information on effects of alcohol types and early phases of Type 2 diabetes development seems warranted. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of alcohol consumption and specific alcoholic beverages on the risk of developing pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes in middle-aged Swedish men and women.
Subjects, who at baseline had normal glucose tolerance (2070 men and 3058 women) or pre-diabetes (70 men and 41 women), aged 35-56 years, were evaluated in this cohort study. Logistic regression was performed to estimate the risk [odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI)] to develop pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes at 8-10 years follow-up, in relation to self-reported alcohol intake at baseline. Adjustment was performed for several risk factors.
Total alcohol consumption and binge drinking increased the risk of pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes in men (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.00-2.03 and OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.11-2.50, respectively), while low consumption decreased diabetes risk in women (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.22-0.79). Men showed higher risk of pre-diabetes with high beer consumption (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.13-3.01) and of Type 2 diabetes with high consumption of spirits (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.27-3.24). Women showed a reduced risk of pre-diabetes with high wine intake (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.43-0.99) and of Type 2 diabetes with medium intake of both wine and spirits (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.88 and OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.31-0.97, respectively), whereas high consumption of spirits increased the pre-diabetes risk(OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.47-3.96).
High alcohol consumption increases the risk of abnormal glucose regulation in men. In women the associations are more complex: decreased risk with low or medium intake and increased risk with high alcohol intake.
PubMed ID
21916972 View in PubMed
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119 records – page 1 of 12.