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Assessment of volume segmentation in radiotherapy of adolescents; a treatment planning study by the Swedish Workgroup for Paediatric Radiotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114806
Source
Acta Oncol. 2014 Jan;53(1):126-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Ingrid Kristensen
Måns Agrup
Per Bergström
Jacob Engellau
Hedda Haugen
Ulla Martinsson
Kristina Nilsson
Zahra Taheri-Kadkhoda
Jack Lindh
Per Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Oncology, Lund University , Lund , Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 2014 Jan;53(1):126-33
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Chordoma - pathology - radiotherapy
Female
Hodgkin Disease - pathology - radiotherapy
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Male
Pediatrics
Prognosis
Prostatic Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Radiotherapy Dosage
Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted
Radiotherapy, Conformal
Rhabdomyosarcoma - pathology - radiotherapy
Skull Base Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Sweden
Wilms Tumor - pathology - radiotherapy
Abstract
The variability in target delineation for similar cases between centres treating paediatric and adolescent patients, and the apparent differences in interpretation of radiotherapy guidelines in the treatment protocols encouraged us to perform a dummy-run study as a part of our quality assurance work. The aim was to identify and quantify differences in the segmentation of target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) and to analyse the treatment plans and dose distributions.
Four patient cases were selected: Wilm's tumour, Hodgkin's disease, rhabdomyosarcoma of the prostate and chordoma of the skull base. The five participating centres received the same patient-related material. They introduced the cases in their treatment planning system, delineated target volumes and OARs and created treatment plans. Dose-volume histograms were retrieved for relevant structures and volumes and dose metrics were derived and compared, e.g. target volumes and their concordance, dose homogeneity index (HI), treated and irradiated volumes, remaining volume at risk and relevant Vx and Dx values.
We found significant differences in target segmentation in the majority of the cases. The planning target volumes (PTVs) varied two- to four-fold and conformity indices were in the range of 0.3-0.6. This resulted in large variations in dose distributions to OARs as well as in treated and irradiated volumes even though the treatment plans showed good conformity to the PTVs. Potential reasons for the differences in target delineation were analysed.
Considerations of the growing child and difficulties in interpretation of the radiotherapy information in the treatment protocols were identified as reasons for the variation. As a result, clarified translated detailed radiotherapy guidelines for paediatric/adolescent patients have been recognised as a way to reduce this variation.
PubMed ID
23577745 View in PubMed
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Association studies of a polymorphism in the Wilms' tumor 1 locus in Norwegian patients with testicular cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23569
Source
Int J Cancer. 1994 Aug 15;58(4):523-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1994
Author
K R Heimdal
R A Lothe
S D Fosså
A L Børresen
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1994 Aug 15;58(4):523-6
Date
Aug-15-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11
Gene Frequency
Genes, Wilms Tumor - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Testicular Neoplasms - genetics
Abstract
One strategy for identifying genes involved in genetic predisposition to testicular germ-cell tumors (TC) is to perform association studies with polymorphic loci at or closely linked to candidate genes. Genes involved in normal fetal genital development, such as the Wilms' tumor 1 gene (WT1) located at 11p13, are among such candidates. The present study compares a TC (n = 442) and a control (n = 384) population for the allele frequencies of 2 polymorphic loci located at chromosome band 11p13. One of the polymorphisms (WT) was located within and the other (D11S325) in close proximity to the WT1 gene. No differences in allele frequencies between cancer patients and controls were found. However, the frequency of the Al allele of the WT polymorphism was significantly increased in one of the cancer subgroups most likely to carry susceptibility genes (patients with bilateral cancer) compared to controls. Furthermore, the frequency of the Al allele was increased in patients with metastatic disease. Such differences in allele frequencies were not observed for the D11S325 locus. The findings might indicate an involvement of the WT1 gene both in susceptibility to TC and in progression of the disease.
PubMed ID
8056449 View in PubMed
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Source
Nord Med. 1971 Oct 28;85(43):1252
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-28-1971
Author
B. Jereb
Source
Nord Med. 1971 Oct 28;85(43):1252
Date
Oct-28-1971
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Scandinavia
Wilms Tumor - mortality - radiotherapy - surgery
PubMed ID
4330170 View in PubMed
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Birth characteristics and risk of Wilms' tumour: a nationwide prospective study in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22468
Source
Br J Cancer. 1996 Oct;74(7):1148-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
J M Heuch
I. Heuch
G. Kvåle
Author Affiliation
Section for Medical Informatics and Statistics, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1996 Oct;74(7):1148-51
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Apgar score
Birth weight
Body constitution
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Wilms Tumor - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Relationships between incidence of Wilms' tumour and information recorded at birth were investigated in a prospective study of the 1,489,297 children born in Norway between 1967 and 1992. A total of 119 individuals were diagnosed with Wilms' tumour in the age interval 0-14 years. A high length at birth was significantly associated with a high risk (incidence rate ratio 1.8 for length > or = 53 cm vs or = 9, 95% CI 1.2-3.9). For all variables for which an association was indicated, the association seemed to be restricted mainly to children aged less than 2 years. This suggests that Wilms' tumour diagnosed early in life may differ aetiologically from that of cases diagnosed later.
PubMed ID
8855990 View in PubMed
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Childhood cancer and paternal employment in agriculture: the role of pesticides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21734
Source
Br J Cancer. 1998 Mar;77(5):825-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
N T Fear
E. Roman
G. Reeves
B. Pannett
Author Affiliation
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1998 Mar;77(5):825-9
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Agriculture
Brazil - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Kidney Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Occupations
Paternal Exposure
Pesticides - adverse effects
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Wilms Tumor - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that the offspring of men potentially exposed to pesticides at work may be at increased risk of kidney cancer (Wilms' tumour), brain tumours, Ewing's bone sarcoma and acute leukaemia. This paper examines the association between potential occupational exposure of fathers to pesticides and offspring's death from cancer in a large national database. Records for 167703 childhood deaths occurring during 1959-63, 1970-78 and 1979-90 in England and Wales have been analysed. Among the offspring of men with potential occupational exposure to pesticides there were 5270 deaths, of which 449 were due to cancer. Associations were assessed using proportional mortality ratios (PMRs), with adjustment for age, year of death and paternal social class. Of the childhood cancers previously linked with potential paternal occupational exposure to pesticides, the only statistically significant excess was for kidney cancer (PMR=1.59, 95% CI=1.18-2.15, based on 42 deaths). Although these results offer some support for the suggestion that paternal occupational exposure to pesticides may be related to the subsequent development of kidney cancer in offspring, other explanations cannot be excluded. In the light of the findings presented here and elsewhere, further, more detailed, research into the nature of this relationship is warranted.
PubMed ID
9514065 View in PubMed
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Cytogenetic findings and clinical course in a consecutive series of Wilms tumors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18658
Source
Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2003 Jan 1;140(1):82-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2003
Author
Carl Magnus Kullendorff
Maria Soller
Thomas Wiebe
Fredrik Mertens
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. carl-magnus.kullendorff@skane.se
Source
Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 2003 Jan 1;140(1):82-7
Date
Jan-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aneuploidy
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosomes, Human - genetics
Cohort Studies
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Infant
Karyotyping
Kidney Neoplasms - genetics - pathology
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Trisomy
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Wilms Tumor - genetics - pathology
Abstract
Wilms tumor (WT) is characterized by a nonrandom pattern of chromosome aberrations, but the clinical significance of different cytogenetic patterns is unknown. The present study describes the cytogenetic findings and the clinical course in a cohort of 39 children with WT. Samples for short-term culturing and cytogenetic analysis were obtained during a 15-year period. Clonal chromosome aberrations were detected in 23 samples from 19 patients. Tumors that relapsed more often showed clonal aberrations than did tumors that did not. However, this association my have been due to sampling bias. Among the cases with karyotypically abnormal samples, the modal chromosome number was in the near-diploid range in 10, hyperdiploid/hypotriploid in 8, and hypodiploid in 1. The most common changes were trisomy 12 and gain of 1q material (8 cases each), trisomy/tetrasomy 8 (7 cases), and trisomy 13 (5 cases). None of these frequently occurring abnormalities, or the ploidy level, showed any association with clinical outcome, using tumor relapse as an end-point. Nor could any relationship between cytogenetic features and histopathologic subtype be discerned. Although the number of informative cases was too small for proper evaluation, the present study did not contradict the previous notion that loss of material from the long arm of chromosome 16 is associated with poor clinical outcome. All three patients with deletion of 16q developed metastases.
PubMed ID
12550766 View in PubMed
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Does childhood cancer affect parental divorce rates? A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98500
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2010 Feb 10;28(5):872-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-2010
Author
Astri Syse
Jon H Loge
Torkild H Lyngstad
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, PO Box 5313, Majorstua, N-0304 Oslo, Norway. astri.syse@kreftregisteret.no
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2010 Feb 10;28(5):872-7
Date
Feb-10-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Divorce - psychology
Educational Status
Family Relations
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - psychology - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance
Prognosis
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Time Factors
Wilms Tumor - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
PURPOSE Cancer in children may profoundly affect parents' personal relationships in terms of psychological stress and an increased care burden. This could hypothetically elevate divorce rates. Few studies on divorce occurrence exist, so the effect of childhood cancers on parental divorce rates was explored. PATIENTS AND METHODS Data on the entire Norwegian married population, age 17 to 69 years, with children age 0 to 20 years in 1974 to 2001 (N = 977,928 couples) were retrieved from the Cancer Registry, the Central Population Register, the Directorate of Taxes, and population censuses. Divorce rates for 4,590 couples who were parenting a child with cancer were compared with those of otherwise similar couples by discrete-time hazard regression models. Results Cancer in a child was not associated with an increased risk of parental divorce overall. An increased divorce rate was observed with Wilms tumor (odds ratio [OR], 1.52) but not with any of the other common childhood cancers. The child's age at diagnosis, time elapsed from diagnosis, and death from cancer did not influence divorce rates significantly. Increased divorce rates were observed for couples in whom the mothers had an education greater than high school level (OR, 1.16); the risk was particularly high shortly after diagnosis, for CNS cancers and Wilms tumors, for couples with children 0 to 9 years of age at diagnosis, and after a child's death. CONCLUSION This large, registry-based study shows that cancer in children is not associated with an increased parental divorce rate, except with Wilms tumors. Couples in whom the wife is highly educated appear to face increased divorce rates after a child's cancer, and this may warrant additional study.
PubMed ID
20038725 View in PubMed
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Fetal growth and childhood cancer: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106455
Source
Pediatrics. 2013 Nov;132(5):e1265-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Tone Bjørge
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Tom Grotmol
Anders Engeland
Olof Stephansson
Mika Gissler
Steinar Tretli
Rebecca Troisi
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, N-5020 Bergen, Norway. tone.bjorge@igs.uib.no.
Source
Pediatrics. 2013 Nov;132(5):e1265-75
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Central Nervous System Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Development - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Wilms Tumor - diagnosis - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The etiology of childhood cancers is largely unknown. Studies have suggested that birth characteristics may be associated with risk. Our goal was to evaluate the risk of childhood cancers in relation to fetal growth.
We conducted a case-control study nested within Nordic birth registries. The study included cancer cases diagnosed in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden among children born from 1967 to 2010 and up to 10 matched controls per case, totaling 17,698 cases and 172,422 controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were derived from conditional logistic regression.
Risks of all childhood cancers increased with increasing birth weight (P trend = .001). Risks of acute lymphoid leukemia and Wilms tumor were elevated when birth weight was >4000 g and of central nervous system tumors when birth weight was >4500 g. Newborns large for gestational age were at increased risk of Wilms tumor (OR: 2.1 [95% CI: 1.2-3.6]) and connective/soft tissue tumors (OR: 2.1 [95% CI: 1.1-4.4]). In contrast, the risk of acute myeloid leukemia was increased among children born small for gestational age (OR: 1.8 [95% CI: 1.1-3.1]). Children diagnosed with central nervous system tumors at 39 cm had the highest risk (OR: 4.7 [95% CI: 2.5-8.7]).
In this large, Nordic population-based study, increased risks for several childhood tumors were associated with measures of fetal growth, supporting the hypothesis that tumorigenesis manifesting in childhood is initiated in utero.
PubMed ID
24167169 View in PubMed
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56 records – page 1 of 6.