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The boreal herbal: Wild food and medicine plants of the North

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101960
Source
Whitehorse, Yukon: Aroma Borealis Press
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2011
Author
Gray, B
Source
Whitehorse, Yukon: Aroma Borealis Press
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Apothecary
Harvesting
Healing
Preserving wild plants
Abstract
The Boreal Herbal is about understanding our interconnection with the natural world through the exploration of wild food and medicine plants in the northern landscape. By its definition, an "herbal" is a book that combines information on botany, medicine, and traditional lore. The Boreal Herbal is part plant-identification guide, and part medicine- and food-making guide. It includes recipes for use at home and for use while traversing the wild lands of the boreal forest. The book features plants found in remote stretches of the wilderness and common "weeds" that grow around our homes, gardens, and recreational areas.
Notes
UAA/APU Consortium Library Alaskana Collection: QK99.C3 G73 2011
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Herbal tea maker taps nature's bounty for budding business.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300531
Source
Chilkat Valley News. July 10, 2003. XXXIII (27) : p.1, 9.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Bigsby, Kristin
Source
Chilkat Valley News. July 10, 2003. XXXIII (27) : p.1, 9.
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Non-timber forest products
Wild plants
Haines
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Medicinal flora of the Alaska Natives: A compilation of knowledge from literary sources of Aleut, Alutiiq, Athabascan, Eyak, Haida, Inupiat, Tlingit, Tsimshian, and Yupik traditional healing methods using plants

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2765
Source
Anchorage, Alaska: Alaska Natural Heritage Program. Environment and Natural Resources Institute. University of Alaska Anchorage.
Date
1999
  1 document  
Author
Garibaldi, A.
Source
Anchorage, Alaska: Alaska Natural Heritage Program. Environment and Natural Resources Institute. University of Alaska Anchorage.
Date
1999
Geographic Location
U.S.
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Eskimos--medicine--Alaska
Traditional ecological knowledge
Traditional medicine--Alaska
Eskimos--ethnobotany--Alaska
Indians of North America--ethnobotany--Alaska
Indians of North America--medicine--Alaska
Alternative medicine--Alaska
Materia medica, vegetable--Alaska
Ethnobotany--Alaska
Botany, medical--Alaska
Wild plants, edible--Alaska
Abstract
This book is a comprehensive collection of traditional plant knowledge gathered from literature sources. It is not intended to be a guide book or "how-to" for using medicinal plants. It is, however, designed to be a tool for referencing traditional Alaska Native uses of healing with plants and provides baseline data for communities wishing to further enhance their knowledge of cultural plant usage.
Notes
Alaska E 98. M4 G37 1999
http://aknhp.uaa.alaska.edu/traditional_use/Med_Flora_AK_Natives.pdf
SMM Nov 2004
Documents

Med_Flora_AK_Natives.pdf

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Reconstructing Food Ways: Role of Skolt Sami Cultural Revitalization Programs in Local Plant Use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300845
Source
Journal of Ethnobiology v36 n1 (03 2016): 85-104.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Magnani, Natalia
Source
Journal of Ethnobiology v36 n1 (03 2016): 85-104.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural revitalization
Scots pine inner bark
chaga mushroom
Wild plants
Consumption trends
Abstract
Cultural programs, such as revitalization forums, support community goals of resilience, whether by conserving and recreating particular plant uses, or by fostering dynamic traditions marked by innovation and adoption of new wild food uses and ideologies. This paper explores the significance of traditional plant revitalization forums for the Sevettijärvi-Näätämö community, located in northern Finland in close proximity to Norwegian and Russian borders. Along with Finns and other Sami groups, this region comprises a significant Skolt Sami population present in the area since relocation from Petsamo (in particular Suenjel sijd) after World War II. The unique history of the region and past marginalization and assimilation pressures have stimulated current revitalization initiatives, which seek to celebrate Skolt Sami culture and revitalize traditional skills and knowledge, including food traditions. The study compares food tradition presentations during a summer cultural festival with ethnographic data on wild food use in Sevettijärvi-Näätämö. This comparison explores selection of knowledge for revitalization forums, and the potential impact of this selection on wild food use. Results show that the types of plant and fungi uses (in particular Inonotus obliquus and the inner bark of Pinus sylvestris) presented in revitalization forums reflect a blend of historical and recent nutritional influences. These plants and fungi may be well-known and recorded anthropologically or commercialized and commonly available. On the other hand, cultural programs focus on food traditions while excluding medicinal plants. Data on local plant use demonstrates that the degree to which revitalization forums impact plant use may depend on opportunities for acquiring skills through other avenues.
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Wild, edible and poisonous plants of Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76009
Source
Fairbanks: Cooperative Extension Service, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Date
1953, 1958, 1974, 1976, 1993
Author
Heller, CA
Source
Fairbanks: Cooperative Extension Service, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Date
1953, 1958, 1974, 1976, 1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Berries
Fruits
Greens
Leaves
Roots
Stems
Wild plants
Abstract
Documents common edible and poisonous plants found in Alaska, with suggestions on storage and best eating practices.
Notes
Mutliple editions held at the UAA Consortium Library and in the ARLIS collection.
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