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Adherence to a Healthy Nordic Diet and Risk of Stroke: A Danish Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282576
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Kim Overvad
Cecilie Kyrø
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Søren Paaske Johnsen
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Healthy Diet - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries - epidemiology
Stroke - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Abstract
Specific dietary patterns, including the Mediterranean diet, have been associated with stroke prevention. Our aim was to investigate whether adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, including fish, apples and pears, cabbages, root vegetables, rye bread, and oatmeal, was associated with risk of stroke.
Incident cases of stroke among 55?338 men and women from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort were identified from the Danish National Patient Register and verified by review of records. Cases of ischemic stroke were further subclassified based on etiology according to the TOAST classification system (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment). Information on diet was collected at baseline (1993-1997) using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazards ratios of total stroke and subtypes of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.
During a median follow-up of 13.5 years, 2283 cases of incident stroke were verified, including 1879 ischemic strokes. Adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, as reflected by a higher Healthy Nordic Food Index score, was associated with a lower risk of stroke. The hazards ratio comparing an index score of 4 to 6 (high adherence) with an index score of 0 to 1 (low adherence) was 0.86 (95% confidence interval 0.76-0.98) for total stroke. Inverse associations were observed for ischemic stroke, including large-artery atherosclerosis. No trend was observed for hemorrhagic stroke; however, a statistically insignificant trend was observed for intracerebral hemorrhage.
Our findings suggest that a healthy Nordic diet may be recommended for the prevention of stroke.
PubMed ID
28049735 View in PubMed
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Associations between adherence to the Danish Food-Based Dietary Guidelines and cardiometabolic risk factors in a Danish adult population: the DIPI study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299378
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 03; 119(6):664-673
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Johanne L Arentoft
Camilla Hoppe
Elisabeth W Andersen
Kim Overvad
Inge Tetens
Author Affiliation
1Division of Diet, Disease Prevention and Toxicology,National Food Institute,Technical University of Denmark,2800 Kgs. Lyngby,Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 03; 119(6):664-673
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Sugars - administration & dosage
Exercise
Fatty Acids - administration & dosage
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Quality
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Metabolic Syndrome - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Waist Circumference
Whole Grains
Abstract
Diet is recognised as one modifiable lifestyle factor for ischaemic heart disease (IHD). We aimed at investigating the associations between adherence to the Danish Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) indicated by a Dietary Quality Index (DQI) and selected cardiometabolic risk factors in a cross-sectional study with 219 Danish adult participants (59 %women; age 31-65years) with a minimum of one self-rated risk marker of IHD. Information regarding diet was obtained using web-based dietary assessment software and adherence to the Danish FBDG was expressed by a DQI calculated from 5 food and nutrient indicators (whole grain, fish, fruit and vegetables, energy from saturated fat and from added sugar). Background information, blood samples and anthropometrics were collected and blood pressure was measured. Linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between DQI and cardiometabolic risk factors. DQI was inversely associated with LDL:HDL ratio and TAG (-0·089 per unit; 95 % CI -0·177, -0·002 and -5 % per unit; 95 % CI -9, 0, respectively) and positively associated with HDL-cholesterol (0·047 mmol/l per unit; 95 % CI 0·007, 0·088). For men, DQI was inversely associated with BMI (-3 %per unit; 95 % CI -5, -1), trunk fat (-1 % per unit; 95 % CI -2, -1), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (-30 % per unit; 95 % CI -41, -16 %), HbA1c (-0·09 % per unit; 95 % CI -0·14, -0·04), insulin (-13 % per unit; 95 % CI -19, -7) and homoeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (-14 % per unit; 95 % CI -21, -7). In women, DQI was positively associated with systolic blood pressure (2·6 mmHg per unit; 95 % CI 0·6, 4·6). In conclusion, higher adherence to the current Danish FBDG was associated with a more beneficial cardiometabolic risk profile in a Danish adult population with a minimum of one self-rated risk factor for IHD.
PubMed ID
29352831 View in PubMed
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The cholesterol-lowering effect of statins is potentiated by whole grains intake. The Polish Norwegian Study (PONS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295737
Source
Eur J Intern Med. 2018 04; 50:47-51
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
04-2018
Author
Georgeta D Vaidean
Marta Manczuk
Sandeep S Vansal
Jacqueline Griffith
Author Affiliation
Fairleigh Dickinson University, School of Pharmacy, Florham Park, NJ, USA. Electronic address: gvaidean@fdu.edu.
Source
Eur J Intern Med. 2018 04; 50:47-51
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Hypercholesterolemia - blood - drug therapy
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Poland
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Whole Grains
Abstract
Hypercholesterolemia treatment guidelines emphasize an adequate whole grains (WG) intake, alone or complementary to pharmacological treatment. We conducted this study to compare the prevalence of adequate WG intake and levels of blood lipids according to the statin/WG intake status.
This cross-sectional analysis of a community-based study included 12,754 men and women, age 45-64. Statin use over past 30days was recorded by trained nurses. Food intake over past 12months was assessed by a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Adequate WG intake was defined as =3oz-equivalents/day, representing =3WGservings/day.
The prevalence of an adequate WG intake was marginally superior in statin users (26.79%) than non-users (21.51%). This superiority was attenuated after multiple covariates adjustment (PR 1.12, 95%CI 1.02-1.22). Statin users with an adequate WG intake had lower multivariable-adjusted mean blood total cholesterol (185.14mg/dL vs. 190.14mg/dL) and LDL cholesterol (103.30mg/dL vs. 108.19mg/dL) than those with an inadequate WG intake. Statin users with an adequate WG intake had lower odds (OR, 95% CI) of having TC=240mg/dL (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.46-0.98) and lower odds of having LDL=100mg/dL (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.58-0.89), compared to statin users with inadequate WG intake. A subgroup analysis restricted to those with prevalent CVD yielded similar results.
In this community based sample of middle-aged adults, only one in four statin users had adequate whole grain intake. Statin users with adequate WG intake had statistically and clinically significant lower levels of blood total- and LDL-cholesterol.
PubMed ID
29137927 View in PubMed
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Consumption of Whole-Grain Bread and Risk of Colorectal Cancer among Norwegian Women (the NOWAC Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276559
Source
Nutrients. 2016 Jan;8(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Toril Bakken
Tonje Braaten
Anja Olsen
Cecilie Kyrø
Eiliv Lund
Guri Skeie
Source
Nutrients. 2016 Jan;8(1)
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bread
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Eating
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Whole Grains
Abstract
There is evidence that consumption of foods containing dietary fiber decreases the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Whole grains contain dietary fiber, as well as a range of micronutrients and bioactive compounds, but the association between the consumption of whole grains and the risk of CRC remains less studied. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between whole-grain bread consumption and CRC incidence among Norwegian women, using data from a prospective cohort study (the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study). Dietary intake was estimated from the food-frequency questionnaires of 78,254 women in the cohort (median age: 55 years), and these women were then followed up for CRC incidence. During the 9 years of median follow-up, 795 women were diagnosed with CRC (316 proximal, 193 distal, 218 rectal). Associations between whole-grain bread consumption and the risk of CRC (including colorectal subsites) were investigated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. When compared to the low consumption group, the hazard ratio for CRC was 0.89 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.72-1.09) for the high consumption group and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.72-1.02) for the medium consumption group in a multivariable model. Overall, no association between whole-grain bread consumption and CRC was found.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26771634 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary intake of whole grains and plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations in relation to changes in anthropometry: the Danish diet, cancer and health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291645
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017 08; 71(8):944-952
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2017
Author
C Kyrø
M Kristensen
M U Jakobsen
J Halkjær
R Landberg
Hb As Bueno-de-Mesquita
J Christensen
I Romieu
A Tjønneland
A Olsen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017 08; 71(8):944-952
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Alkylation
Biomarkers - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Healthy Diet - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Overweight - blood - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Prospective Studies
Resorcinols - blood
Risk
Secale
Self Report
Sex Factors
Triticum
Waist Circumference - ethnology
Weight Gain - ethnology
Whole Grains
Abstract
Whole grain intake has been associated with a small but significant lower body weight gain in observational studies, but there is limited knowledge about the associations with specific whole grain types. The objective was to investigate the association between whole grains, different sources of whole grains and biomarkers of whole grain intake (alkylresorcinols) in relation to subsequent changes in waist circumference (WC) and body weight.
Cohort study of 57?053 participants with baseline information on whole grain intake from questionnaires (FFQ) and biomarkers of whole grain rye and wheat intake, plasma alkylresorcinols, for a subset. WC and body weight were measured at baseline and again at follow-up. The associations were estimated using multiple linear regression analyses and logistic regression.
For women, overall whole grain intake was not related to changes in WC or body weight. For men, total whole grain intake was associated with gains in WC (?WC per 25?g increment: 0.44?cm, 95% CI: 0.34?cm; 0.54?cm) and body weight (?weight per 25?g increment: 150?g, 95% CI: 78?g; 222?g), but the results changed to null or changed direction when adjusting for baseline anthropometry. For the different sources of whole grains, rye (women) and crispbread was significantly associated with gains in WC and body weight. Plasma alkylresorcinol concentration was associated with reduced WC, but not body weight, for women (?WC per 50?nmol/l increment: -0.69?cm, 95% CI:-1.26?cm;-0.13?cm), but no association was found for men.
Overall, no strong relationship between whole grain intake, measured from questionnaires or using biomarkers was found in relation to changes in body weight and WC.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28176776 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary patterns and whole grain cereals in the Scandinavian countries--differences and similarities. The HELGA project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268559
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Apr;18(5):905-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Dagrun Engeset
Dag Hofoss
Lena M Nilsson
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Guri Skeie
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Apr;18(5):905-15
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutrition Policy
Principal Component Analysis
Prospective Studies
Secale - chemistry
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Triticum - chemistry
Whole Grains
Abstract
To identify dietary patterns with whole grains as a main focus to see if there is a similar whole grain pattern in the three Scandinavian countries; Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Another objective is to see if items suggested for a Nordic Food Index will form a typical Nordic pattern when using factor analysis.
The HELGA study population is based on samples of existing cohorts: the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study, the Swedish Västerbotten cohort and the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study. The HELGA study aims to generate knowledge about the health effects of whole grain foods.
The study included a total of 119 913 participants.
The associations among food variables from FFQ were investigated by principal component analysis. Only food groups common for all three cohorts were included. High factor loading of a food item shows high correlation of the item to the specific diet pattern.
The main whole grain for Denmark and Sweden was rye, while Norway had highest consumption of wheat. Three similar patterns were found: a cereal pattern, a meat pattern and a bread pattern. However, even if the patterns look similar, the food items belonging to the patterns differ between countries.
High loadings on breakfast cereals and whole grain oat were common in the cereal patterns for all three countries. Thus, the cereal pattern may be considered a common Scandinavian whole grain pattern. Food items belonging to a Nordic Food Index were distributed between different patterns.
PubMed ID
24901310 View in PubMed
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Diet-related inflammation and oesophageal cancer by histological type: a nationwide case-control study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281417
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Jun;55(4):1683-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Yunxia Lu
Nitin Shivappa
Yulan Lin
Jesper Lagergren
James R Hébert
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Jun;55(4):1683-94
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Aged
Body mass index
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Diet Surveys
Educational Status
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Exercise
Female
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Whole Grains
Abstract
This project sought to test the role of diet-related inflammation in modulating the risk of oesophageal cancer.
A nationwide population-based case-control study was conducted from 1 December 1994 through 31 December 1997 in Sweden. All newly diagnosed patients with adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus or gastroesophageal junction and a randomly selected half of patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma were eligible as cases. Using the Swedish Registry of the Total Population, the control group was randomly selected from the entire Swedish population and frequency-matched on age (within 10 years) and sex. The literature-derived dietary inflammatory index (DII) was developed to describe the inflammatory potential of diet. DII scores were computed based on a food frequency questionnaire. Higher DII scores indicate more pro-inflammatory diets. Odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were computed to assess risk associated between DII scores and oesophageal cancer using logistic regression adjusted by potential confounders.
In total, 189 oesophageal adenocarcinomas, 262 gastroesophageal junctional adenocarcinomas, 167 oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas, and 820 control subjects were recruited into the study. Significant associations with DII were observed for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ORQuartile4vs1 4.35, 95 % CI 2.24, 8.43), oesophageal adenocarcinoma (ORQuartile4vs1 3.59, 95 % CI 1.87, 6.89), and gastroesophageal junctional adenocarcinoma (ORQuartile4vs1 2.04, 95 % CI 1.24, 3.36). Significant trends across quartiles of DII were observed for all subtypes of oesophageal cancer.
Diet-related inflammation appears to be associated with an increased risk of oesophageal cancer, regardless of histological type.
PubMed ID
26189130 View in PubMed
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Effect of a nutrition intervention on intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread among low and high consumers in the Norwegian National Guard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275465
Source
Mil Med. 2014 Sep;179(9):1013-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Solveig Uglem
Marte K Råberg Kjøllesdal
Wenche Frølich
Margareta Wandel
Source
Mil Med. 2014 Sep;179(9):1013-20
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread
Energy intake
Fruit
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Norway
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Young Adult
Abstract
Nutritional information seldom reaches individuals with the most unhealthful dietary habits.
To explore whether an intervention focusing on a combination of nutritional information and increased availability of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread was effective to raise the intake, and knowledge, of these foods among recruits in the military with low as well as high baseline intake.
Intervention study, including 479 recruits, in intervention and control military camps. The participants were divided into three groups (low, medium, and high) according to their baseline intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread.
Those with low/medium baseline intake in the intervention camp had a significant increase in the intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread at follow-up. All three intake groups in the intervention camp also had significantly higher intake of these foods compared to those in the control camp at follow-up. The knowledge scores increased significantly among both high and low consumers in the intervention camp, but not in the control camp.
The intervention led to increased intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread among those recruits in the intervention camp, who were most in need to change their diet.
PubMed ID
25181720 View in PubMed
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Effects of whole-grain rye porridge with added inulin and wheat gluten on appetite, gut fermentation and postprandial glucose metabolism: a randomised, cross-over, breakfast study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282573
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Dec;116(12):2139-2149
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Isabella Lee
Lin Shi
Dominic-Luc Webb
Per M Hellström
Ulf Risérus
Rikard Landberg
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Dec;116(12):2139-2149
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Appetite Regulation
Biomarkers - analysis - blood
Breakfast
Cross-Over Studies
Energy intake
Female
Fermentation
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Glutens - administration & dosage - metabolism
Humans
Hyperglycemia - blood - prevention & control
Hyperinsulinism - blood - prevention & control
Inulin - administration & dosage - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Postprandial Period
Secale - chemistry
Single-Blind Method
Sweden
Triticum - chemistry
Whole Grains - chemistry
Young Adult
Abstract
Whole-grain rye foods reduce appetite, insulin and sometimes glucose responses. Increased gut fermentation and plant protein may mediate the effect. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether the appetite-suppressing effects of whole-grain rye porridge could be enhanced by replacing part of the rye with fermented dietary fibre and plant protein, and to explore the role of gut fermentation on appetite and metabolic responses over 8 h. We conducted a randomised, cross-over study using two rye porridges (40 and 55 g), three 40-g rye porridges with addition of inulin:gluten (9:3; 6:6; 3:9 g) and a refined wheat bread control (55 g), served as part of complete breakfasts. A standardised lunch and an ad libitum dinner were served 4 and 8 h later, respectively. Appetite, breath hydrogen and methane, glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) responses were measured over 8 h. Twenty-one healthy men and women, aged 23-60 years, with BMI of 21-33 kg/m2 participated in this study. Before lunch, the 55-g rye porridges lowered hunger by 20 % and desire to eat by 22 % and increased fullness by 29 % compared with wheat bread (P
PubMed ID
28069076 View in PubMed
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Higher intake of fish and fat is associated with lower plasma s-adenosylhomocysteine: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293475
Source
Nutr Res. 2017 Oct; 46:78-87
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Mads V Lind
Lotte Lauritzen
Oluf Pedersen
Henrik Vestergaard
Ken D Stark
Torben Hansen
Alastair B Ross
Mette Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark; Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: madslind@nexs.ku.dk.
Source
Nutr Res. 2017 Oct; 46:78-87
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Biomarkers - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Records
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Healthy Diet
Humans
Hyperhomocysteinemia - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Metabolic Syndrome - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Principal Component Analysis
Risk
S-Adenosylhomocysteine - blood
Seafood
Whole Grains
Young Adult
Abstract
Several B-vitamins act as co-factors in one-carbon metabolism, a pathway that plays a central role in several chronic diseases. However, there is a lack of knowledge of how diet affects markers in one-carbon metabolism. The aim of this study was to explore dietary patterns and components associated with one-carbon metabolites. We hypothesized that intake of whole-grains and fish would be associated with lower Hcy, and higher SAM:SAH ratio due to their nutrient content. We assessed dietary information using a four-day dietary record in 118 men and women with features of the metabolic syndrome. In addition we assessed whole-blood fatty acid composition and plasma alkylresorcinols. Plasma s-adenosylmethionine (SAM), s-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), homocysteine (Hcy) and vitamin B12 was included as one-carbon metabolism markers. We used principal component analysis (PCA) to explore dietary patterns and multiple linear regression models to examine associations between dietary factors and one-carbon metabolites. PCA separated subjects based on prudent and unhealthy dietary patterns, but the dietary pattern score was not related to the one-carbon metabolites. Whole grain intake was found to be inversely associated to plasma Hcy (-4.7% (-9.3; 0.0), P=.05) and total grain intake tended to be positively associated with SAM and SAH (2.4% (-0.5; 5.5), P=.08; 5.8% (-0.2; 12.1), P=.06, respectively, per SD increase in cereal intake). Fish intake was inversely associated with plasma Hcy and SAH concentrations (-5.4% (-9.7; -0.8), P=.02 and -7.0% (-12.1; -1.5), P=.01, respectively) and positively associated with the SAM:SAH ratio (6.2% (1.6; 11.0), P=.008). In conclusion, intake and fish and whole-grain appear to be associated with a beneficial one-carbon metabolism profile. This indicates that dietary components could play a role in regulation of one-carbon metabolism with a potential impact on disease prevention.
PubMed ID
29129471 View in PubMed
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