Skip header and navigation

Refine By

6 records – page 1 of 1.

An examination of coping styles and expectations for whiplash injury in Germany: comparison with Canadian data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135783
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2011 Sep;30(9):1209-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Robert Ferrari
Stephanie Pieschl
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, 11350-83 Avenue, Edmonton, AB, Canada. rferrari@shaw.ca
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2011 Sep;30(9):1209-14
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Canada
Chronic Pain - etiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Germany
Humans
Male
Neck Pain - etiology - psychology
Whiplash Injuries - complications - psychology
Abstract
Cross-sectional cohort study: to examine concurrent expectations and coping style for whiplash injury in injury-naive subjects in Germany. Studies suggest the recovery rate from whiplash injury may be faster in Germany than in Canada. Canadians have a high expectation for chronic pain following whiplash injury and Germans do not. Expectation of recovery not only predicts recovery in whiplash victims but is also known to correlate with coping style. The Vanderbilt Pain Management Inventory was administered to university students and staff in Germany. Subjects who had not yet experienced whiplash injury were given a vignette concerning a neck sprain (whiplash injury) in a motor vehicle collision and were asked to indicate how likely they were to have thoughts or behaviours indicated in the coping style questionnaire. Subjects also completed expectation questionnaires regarding whiplash injury. Sixteen percent of subjects held an expectation of chronic neck or back pain after whiplash injury. The mean active coping style score was 27.4±3.6 (40 is the maximum score for active coping). The mean passive coping style score was 27.0±6.3 (50 is the maximum score for passive coping). Coping style scores and patterns were not different from those previously observed in Canadian studies, but there was no correlation between expectations and coping style among German subjects, a finding that differs from Canadian studies. Although expectations and coping styles may interact or be co-modifiers in the outcomes of whiplash injury in Canadian whiplash victims, in Germany, despite having similar coping styles to Canadians, the lack of expectation for chronic pain may be protective from the effect of passive coping styles. Further studies of coping style as an aetiologic factor in the chronic whiplash syndrome are needed.
PubMed ID
21448615 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coping patterns and their relation to daily activity, worries, depressed mood, and pain intensity in acute whiplash-associated disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126525
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2013 Jun;20(2):293-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Annika Bring
Johan Bring
Anne Söderlund
Elisabet Wasteson
Pernilla Asenlöf
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Husargatan 3, Uppsala, Sweden. annika.bring@neuro.uu.se
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2013 Jun;20(2):293-303
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Depression - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - complications
Pain Measurement - methods
Return to Work - psychology
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Whiplash Injuries - complications - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a lack of knowledge regarding how individuals with acute whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) appraise and cope with situation-specific stressors.
The aim of the study was to describe the daily process of coping reported in a daily coping assessment by individuals with acute WAD within 1 month after the accident. More specifically, profiles of coping strategies were identified and patterns between stressors, primary and secondary appraisals, and coping strategy profiles were described in relation to reported level of activity, worries, depressed mood and pain intensity during the day.
A descriptive and exploratory design was applied. Two hundred and twenty-nine whiplash-associated disorders-daily coping assessment (WAD-DCA) collected during seven consecutive days from 51 participants with acute WAD in Sweden, were included. Cluster analysis was used to obtain coping strategy profiles and data were graphically visualised as patterns through the coping process.
When measuring coping as a daily process relating to the specific stressful situation, different coping process patterns appeared. During days with a high degree of physical and mental well-being, high self-efficacy beliefs seemed to be working as an important secondary appraisal, whereas during days with a low degree of physical and mental well-being primary appraisals of the stressor as a threat and catastrophic thoughts were present in the coping process.
Early identification of situational- and individual-specific stressors, appraisals and coping efforts as measured by the WAD-DCA may contribute to the understanding of the coping process in the acute stage of WAD and its possible impact on recovery and adjustment.
PubMed ID
22382932 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors related to non-recovery from whiplash. The Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study (HUNT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256564
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2014 Jun;21(3):430-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Solbjørg Makalani Myrtveit
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Keith J Petrie
Ingvard Wilhelmsen
Hanne Gro Wenzel
Børge Sivertsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, FHI PHSP, Kalfarveien 31, 5018, Bergen, Norway, makalani.myrtveit@med.uib.no.
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2014 Jun;21(3):430-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - complications
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - complications
Norway - epidemiology
Recovery of Function
Risk factors
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Somatoform Disorders - complications
Whiplash Injuries - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Young Adult
Abstract
Whiplash injuries show a variable prognosis which is difficult to predict. Most individuals experiencing whiplash injuries rapidly recover but a significant proportion develop chronic symptoms and ongoing disability.
By employing longitudinal data, we investigated how psychological and physical symptoms, self-rated health, use of health services and medications, health behavior and demographic factors predict recovery from whiplash.
Data from two waves of a large, Norwegian, population-based study (The Nord-Tr?ndelag Health Study: HUNT2 and HUNT3) were used. Individuals reporting whiplash in HUNT2 (baseline) were identified in HUNT3 11 years later. The characteristics of individuals still suffering from whiplash in HUNT3 were compared with the characteristics of individuals who had recovered using Pearson's chi-squared test, independent sample t-tests and logistic regression.
At follow-up, 31.6 % of those reporting whiplash at baseline had not recovered. These individuals (n = 199) reported worse health at baseline than recovered individuals (n = 431); they reported poorer self-rated health (odds ratio [OR] = 3.12; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 2.20-4.43), more symptoms of anxiety (OR = 1.70; 95 % CI, 1.15-2.50), more diffuse somatic symptoms (OR = 2.38; 95 % CI, 1.61-3.51) and more musculoskeletal symptoms (OR = 1.21; 95 % CI, 1.13-1.29). Individuals still suffering from whiplash also visited more health practitioners at baseline (OR = 1.18; 95 % CI, 1.06-1.32) and used more medications (OR = 1.24; 95 % CI, 1.09-1.40).
Poor self-rated health seems to be a strong risk factor for whiplash injuries becoming chronic. Diffuse somatic symptoms, musculoskeletal symptoms and symptoms of anxiety at baseline are important prognostic risk factors. Knowledge of these maintaining risk factors enables identification of individuals at risk of non-recovery, facilitating adequate treatment for this vulnerable group.
PubMed ID
24048964 View in PubMed
Less detail

Frequency, timing, and course of depressive symptomatology after whiplash.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168302
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2006 Jul 15;31(16):E551-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2006
Author
Linda J Carroll
J David Cassidy
Pierre Côté
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. lcarroll@ualberta.ca
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2006 Jul 15;31(16):E551-6
Date
Jul-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Depression - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Insurance, Accident
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Time Factors
Whiplash Injuries - complications - psychology
Abstract
Population-based incidence cohort.
To report the incidence, timing, and course of depressive symptoms after whiplash.
Evidence is conflicting about the frequency, time of onset, and course of depressive symptoms after whiplash.
Adults making an insurance claim or seeking health care for traffic-related whiplash were followed by telephone interview at 6 weeks, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-injury. Depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and at each follow-up.
Of the 5,211 subjects reporting no pre-injury mental health problems, 42.3% (95% confidence interval, 40.9-43.6) developed depressive symptoms within 6 weeks of the injury, with subsequent onset in 17.8% (95% confidence interval, 16.5-19.2). Depressive symptoms were recurrent or persistent in 37.6% of those with early post-injury onset. Pre-injury mental health problems increased the risk of later onset depressive symptoms and of a recurrent or persistent course of early onset depressive symptoms.
Depressive symptomatology after whiplash is common, occurs early after the injury, and is often persistent or recurrent. This suggests that, like neck pain and headache, depressed symptomatology is part of the cluster of acute whiplash symptoms. Clinicians should be aware of both physical and psychologic injuries after traffic collisions.
PubMed ID
16845342 View in PubMed
Less detail

A population-based survey of beliefs about neck pain from whiplash injury, work-related neck pain, and work-related upper extremity pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157091
Source
Eur J Pain. 2009 Mar;13(3):300-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Geoff P Bostick
Robert Ferrari
Linda J Carroll
Anthony S Russell
Rachelle Buchbinder
Donald Krawciw
Douglas P Gross
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. bostick@ualberta.ca
Source
Eur J Pain. 2009 Mar;13(3):300-4
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arm Injuries - etiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Culture
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Illness Behavior
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - etiology - psychology
Occupational Diseases - complications - psychology
Pain Measurement
Questionnaires
Whiplash Injuries - complications - psychology
Abstract
Beliefs about pain conditions appear to influence recovery in a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. Little is known about population beliefs about neck and arm pain.
To evaluate population beliefs of three common musculoskeletal conditions: work-related neck and arm pain and whiplash injury (WAD).
Mail-out surveys were delivered to 2000 adult residents of two Canadian provinces cross-sectionally. To evaluate beliefs about the three conditions, the back beliefs questionnaire was modified yielding three comparable 10-item measures. In addition, we inquired about the belief about how quickly the condition settles. Respondents indicated their level of agreement on a 5-point Likert scale with lower scores interpreted as negative or pessimistic. Overall and item specific descriptive statistics are reported. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA was performed to compare beliefs across conditions.
Three hundred (15%) surveys were returned. Overall belief scores were different across conditions (p
PubMed ID
18492612 View in PubMed
Less detail

Self-assessments of general and oral health in persons with chronic whiplash-related disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52285
Source
Community Dent Health. 2002 Mar;19(1):32-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
B. Axtelius
B. Söderfeldt
G. Bring
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Public Health, Centre for Oral Health Sciences, Malmö University, Sweden. Bjorn.Axtelius@od.mah.se
Source
Community Dent Health. 2002 Mar;19(1):32-8
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Chronic Disease
Dental Health Surveys
Educational Status
Female
Health status
Holistic Health
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Periodontal Diseases - complications - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sex Factors
Sweden
Whiplash Injuries - complications - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The objectives of the study were 1) to describe general health and daily functioning in a group of subjects with whiplash-associated injuries, 2) to analyse self-assessments of oral disease relative to background factors, 3) to investigate if the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey variables were related to the oral disease variables. DESIGN: Questionnaires included the SF-36 Health Survey, and self-assessed oral health with regard to relevant background factors such as gender, age, education and marital status. Logistic regression modelling was performed. PARTICIPANTS: Members of a nationwide Swedish association enlisting persons who have problems concerning a whiplash injury (n = 1,928) were included. A total of 979 persons participated in the study, a response rate of 50.8%. RESULTS: More than twice as many females (n=680) as men (n=296) responded to the questionnaire. A general trend, in comparing SF-36 scores between the present study group and the normative sample, was that persons with whiplash associated disorders scored considerably lower on all scales. Older age and being of female gender, together with poorer physical functioning and poorer general health, were related to poorer oral health status. CONCLUSION: Self-assessed oral health was correlated to impairment in general health, a finding which is in agreement with an integrated holistic understanding of human health and disease. One causative chain for this may be through the stress mechanisms.
PubMed ID
11922410 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.