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Aboriginal / subsistence whaling (with special reference to the Alaska and Greenland fisheries).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295212
Source
Reports of the International Whaling Commission. Special issue 4. 86 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1982
International Whaling Commission Aboriginal/Subsistence Whaling (with special reference to the Alaska and Greenland fisheries) Reports of the International Whaling Commission Special Issue 4 Cambridge 1982 Preface This volume contains the Reports and some papers from the Panel Meeting
  1 document  
Source
Reports of the International Whaling Commission. Special issue 4. 86 p.
Date
1982
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3179731
Keywords
Bowhead whales
Aleuts
Eskimos
Inuits
Subsistence hunting
Whaling
Nutritional Requirements
Acculturation
Documents

RS464_SI04-AboriginalSub-1982.pdf

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Abundance and survival of Pacific humpback whales in a proposed critical habitat area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256981
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(9):e75228
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Erin Ashe
Janie Wray
Christopher R Picard
Rob Williams
Author Affiliation
Sea Mammal Research Unit, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Fife, Scotland, United Kingdom ; Oceans Initiative, Pearse Island, BC Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(9):e75228
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
British Columbia
Ecological Parameter Monitoring
Ecosystem
Female
Humans
Humpback Whale - physiology
Male
Abstract
Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) were hunted commercially in Canada's Pacific region until 1966. Depleted to an estimated 1,400 individuals throughout the North Pacific, humpback whales are listed as Threatened under Canada's Species at Risk Act (SARA) and Endangered under the US Endangered Species Act. We conducted an 8-year photo-identification study to monitor humpback whale usage of a coastal fjord system in British Columbia (BC), Canada that was recently proposed as candidate critical habitat for the species under SARA. This participatory research program built collaborations among First Nations, environmental non-governmental organizations and academics. The study site, including the territorial waters of Gitga'at First Nation, is an important summertime feeding destination for migratory humpback whales, but is small relative to the population's range. We estimated abundance and survivorship using mark-recapture methods using photographs of naturally marked individuals. Abundance of humpback whales in the region was large, relative to the site's size, and generally increased throughout the study period. The resulting estimate of adult survivorship (0.979, 95% CI: 0.914, 0.995) is at the high end of previously reported estimates. A high rate of resights provides new evidence for inter-annual site fidelity to these local waters. Habitat characteristics of our study area are considered ecologically significant and unique, and this should be considered as regulatory agencies consider proposals for high-volume crude oil and liquefied natural gas tanker traffic through the area. Monitoring population recovery of a highly mobile, migratory species is daunting for low-cost, community-led science. Focusing on a small, important subset of the animals' range can make this challenge more tractable. Given low statistical power and high variability, our community is considering simpler ecological indicators of population health, such as the number of individuals harmed or killed each year by human activities, including ship strikes and entanglement in fishing gear.
Notes
Cites: Biometrika. 1965 Jun;52:249-5914341277
Cites: Biol Lett. 2011 Apr 23;7(2):299-30220943678
Cites: J Acoust Soc Am. 2012 Nov;132(5):EL423-823145705
Cites: Dis Aquat Organ. 2013 Apr 11;103(3):229-6423574708
Cites: Biometrika. 1965 Jun;52:225-4714341276
PubMed ID
24058666 View in PubMed
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Abundance estimate of the Okhotsk Sea population of the bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus Linnaeus, 1758).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293453
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2017 Nov; 477(1):236-238
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
O V Shpak
I G Meschersky
D M Kuznetsova
A N Chichkina
A Yu Paramonov
V V Rozhnov
Author Affiliation
Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. ovshpak@gmail.com.
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2017 Nov; 477(1):236-238
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Bowhead Whale - genetics - physiology
Endangered Species - statistics & numerical data
Genotype
Siberia
Abstract
Abundance of 388 ± 108 whales for the Okhotsk Sea bowhead whale population based on individual genotyping was estimated using the capture-recapture method for the open population model. The data demonstrate that this endangered population shows no signs of recovery.
Notes
Cites: Genetika. 2014 Apr;50(4):452-63 PMID 25715447
PubMed ID
29299808 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of perfluorooctane sulfonate in marine mammals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6747
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2001 Apr 15;35(8):1593-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2001
Author
K. Kannan
J. Koistinen
K. Beckmen
T. Evans
J F Gorzelany
K J Hansen
P D Jones
E. Helle
M. Nyman
J P Giesy
Author Affiliation
National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Department of Zoology, Institute of Environmental Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA. kuruntha@msu.edu
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2001 Apr 15;35(8):1593-8
Date
Apr-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood - pharmacokinetics
Animals
Carnivora
Dolphins
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood - pharmacokinetics
Geography
Liver - chemistry
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seals, Earless
Seawater
Species Specificity
Whales
Abstract
Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a perfluorinated molecule that has recently been identified in the sera of nonindustrially exposed humans. In this study, 247 tissue samples from 15 species of marine mammals collected from Florida, California, and Alaskan coastal waters; and northern Baltic Sea; the Arctic (Spitsbergen); and Sable Island in Canada were analyzed for PFOS. PFOS was detected in liver and blood of marine mammals from most locations including those from Arctic waters. The greatest concentrations of PFOS found in liver and blood were 1520 ng/g wet wt in a bottlenose dolphin from Sarasota Bay, FL, and 475 ng/mL in a ringed seal from the northern Baltic Sea (Bothnian Sea), respectively. No age-dependent increase in PFOS concentrations in marine mammals was observed in the samples analyzed. The occurrence of PFOS in marine mammals from the Arctic waters suggests widespread global distribution of PFOS including remote locations.
PubMed ID
11329707 View in PubMed
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Acoustic detection and satellite-tracking leads to discovery of rare concentration of endangered North Pacific right whales.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166227
Source
Biol Lett. 2006 Sep 22;2(3):417-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-22-2006
Author
Paul Wade
Mads Peter Heide-Jørgensen
Kim Shelden
Jay Barlow
James Carretta
John Durban
Rick LeDuc
Lisa Munger
Shannon Rankin
Allan Sauter
Charles Stinchcomb
Author Affiliation
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle WA 98115, USA.
Source
Biol Lett. 2006 Sep 22;2(3):417-9
Date
Sep-22-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics
Animals
Biopsy
Female
Genetic Variation
Humans
Male
Pacific Ocean
Spatial Behavior - physiology
Species Specificity
Time Factors
Vocalization, Animal - physiology
Whales - genetics
Abstract
The North Pacific right whale, Eubalaena japonica, is one of the most endangered species of whale in the world. On 10 August 2004, two right whales were located in the Bering Sea using headings to right whale calls provided by directional sonobuoys. A satellite-monitored radio tag attached to one of these whales functioned for 40 days. Over the 40-day period, this whale moved throughout a large part of the southeast Bering Sea shelf, including areas of the outer-shelf where right whales have not been seen in decades. In September, multiple right whales were acoustically located and subsequently sighted by another survey vessel approaching a near-real-time position from the tag. An analysis of photographs confirmed at least 17 individual whales (not including the tagged whales). Genetic analysis of biopsy samples identified 17 individuals: 10 males and 7 females. The discovery of seven females was significant, as only one female had been identified in the past. Genetics also confirmed the presence of at least two calves. Although the future of this population is highly uncertain, the discovery of additional females and calves gives some hope that this most critically endangered of all whale populations may still possess the capacity to recover.
Notes
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1999 Oct;8(10):1763-510583845
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1997 Sep;6(9):893-59301078
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1996 Feb;5(1):151-69147690
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1996 Aug;5(4):571-58794563
PubMed ID
17148419 View in PubMed
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Acoustic detections of singing humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in the eastern North Pacific during their northbound migration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201374
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 1999 Jul;106(1):506-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
T F Norris
M. McDonald
J. Barlow
Author Affiliation
Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Martime Services, San Diego, CA 92110, USA. Thomas.f.Norris@cpmx.saic.com
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 1999 Jul;106(1):506-14
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics
Animals
Humans
Pacific Ocean
Spatial Behavior - physiology
Time Factors
Vocalization, Animal - physiology
Whales
Abstract
Numerous (84) acoustic detections of singing humpback whales were made during a spring (08 March-09 June 1997) research cruise to study sperm whales in the central and eastern North Pacific. Over 15,000 km of track-line was surveyed acoustically using a towed hydrophone array. Additionally, 83 sonobuoys were deployed throughout the study area. Detection rates were greatest in late March, near the Hawaiian Islands, and in early April, northeast of the islands. Only one detection was made after April. Detection rates for sonobuoys were unequal in three equally divided longitudinal regions of the study area. Two high density clusters of detections occurred approximately 1200-2000 km northeast of the Hawaiian Islands and were attributed to a large aggregation of migrating animals. The distribution of these detections corroborates findings of previous studies. It is possible that these animals were maintaining acoustic contact during migration. Two unexpected clusters of singing whales were detected approximately 900 to 1000 km west of central and southern California. The location of these detections may indicate a previously undocumented migration route between an offshore breeding area, such as the Revillagigedo Islands, Mexico, and possible feeding areas in the western North Pacific or Bering Sea.
PubMed ID
10420640 View in PubMed
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Alternative approaches to dealing with respondent uncertainty in contingent valuation: a comparative analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129888
Source
J Environ Manage. 2012 Jan;93(1):130-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Roberto Martínez-Espiñeira
Nikita Lyssenko
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's A1C 5S7, NL, Canada. rmartinezesp@mun.ca
Source
J Environ Manage. 2012 Jan;93(1):130-9
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bias (epidemiology)
Conservation of Natural Resources - economics
Data Collection
Financial Support
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Models, Economic
Newfoundland and Labrador
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Uncertainty
Whales
Abstract
Several strategies have been proposed to deal with response uncertainty in contingent valuation. One approach, often applied to address issues of hypothetical bias, recodes and/or reweights responses according to stated levels of certainty but so far few analyses compare alternative recoding and reweighting strategies. We explore the choice among alternative strategies that exploit a numerical certainty scale obtained from a follow-up to the payment question in a valuation survey about a whale conservation program. Two novel variations of previously followed approaches perform best on our dataset in terms of the efficiency of estimates. The first one uses an exponential transformation of the numerical certainty scale as a weight in the willingness to pay regression. The other one is based on constructing a continuous willingness to pay variable with the highly certain "yes" and "no" original responses to the payment question as extreme values and with mid-point values that correspond to the original "don't know" responses. We find, though, that the effect of using different treatment strategies on mean willingness to pay is rarely statistically significant and we fail to detect a consistent effect on the efficiency of the estimation regardless of the strategy applied.
PubMed ID
22054579 View in PubMed
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Arachidonic acid status during pregnancy is associated with polychlorinated biphenyl exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58428
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Mar;77(3):715-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Grandjean P
Weihe P
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense. pgrandjean@health.sdu.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Mar;77(3):715-9
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arachidonic Acid - blood
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Fatty Acid Desaturases - antagonists & inhibitors
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - blood
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Food Contamination
Humans
Infant, Newborn - growth & development
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Pregnancy - blood - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Seafood
Whales
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Seafood is an important source of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPs), which are essential for normal growth and development. However, the nutritional benefits could be limited by polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination. In particular, inhibition of desaturase activities by PCBs may affect the maintenance of arachidonic acid (AA) status during development. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate AA status in a birth cohort from a fishing community with a high seafood intake and a wide range of PCB exposures. DESIGN: We measured LCP concentrations in paired mother and umbilical cord serum samples obtained from 182 consecutive births in the Faroe Islands, where PCB-contaminated whale blubber forms part of the diet. PCB exposure was determined from maternal concentrations. RESULTS: Serum phospholipid AA concentrations averaged 9.14% and 16.5% (by wt) in maternal and cord serum, respectively. After adjustment for gestational age and concentrations of linoleic, alpha-linolenic, and eicosapentaenoic acids, a decrease in AA concentrations of 0.17% (by wt) (95% CI: 0.03%, 0.31%) and 0.31% (by wt) (95% CI: 0.10%, 0.52%) was seen in maternal and cord serum, respectively, for each doubling of PCB exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Increased PCB exposure was associated with a modest decrease in serum AA concentrations, which is in accordance with the experimental evidence of desaturase inhibition by PCBs. Such interference with LCP utilization could attenuate the beneficial effects of the essential lipids contained in seafood. Because AA is of key importance for growth and development, these results suggest that this possible mechanism for PCB toxicity deserves to be explored.
PubMed ID
12600866 View in PubMed
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Arctic science: The local perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130536
Source
Nature. 2011 Oct 13;478(7368):182-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-13-2011
Author
Henry P Huntington
Author Affiliation
Pew Environment Group, 23834 The Clearing Drive, Eagle River, Alaska 99577, USA. hhuntington@pewtrusts.org
Source
Nature. 2011 Oct 13;478(7368):182-3
Date
Oct-13-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Beluga Whale - physiology
Bowhead Whale - physiology
Cooperative Behavior
Ecology - manpower - methods
Global Warming - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Knowledge
Population Groups
Research Personnel - education
PubMed ID
21993743 View in PubMed
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220 records – page 1 of 22.