Skip header and navigation

Refine By

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Ecological complexity and West Nile virus: perspectives on improving public health response.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176395
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Daniel G C Rainham
Author Affiliation
McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, One Stewart Street, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5. drain067@uottawa.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):37-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Communicable Diseases, Emerging - prevention & control - transmission
Disease Vectors
Ecosystem
Geography
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Nonlinear Dynamics
West Nile Fever - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
West Nile virus - physiology
Abstract
The emergence of West Nile Virus, as well as other emerging diseases, is linked to complex ecosystem processes such as climate change and constitutes an important threat to population health. Traditional public health intervention activities related to vector surveillance and control tend to be reactive and limited in their ability to deal with multiple epidemics and in their consideration of population health determinants. This paper reviews the current status of West Nile Virus in Canada and describes how complex systems and geographical perspectives help to acknowledge the influence of ecosystem processes on population health. It also provides examples of how these perspectives can be integrated into population-based intervention strategies.
PubMed ID
15682692 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of climate on West Nile Virus transmission risk used for public health decision-making in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161188
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2007;6:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Salaheddine El Adlouni
Claudie Beaulieu
Taha B M J Ouarda
Pierre L Gosselin
André Saint-Hilaire
Author Affiliation
Hydro-Quebec/NSERC Chair in Statistical Hydrology, Canada Research Chair on the Estimation of Hydrological Variables, University of Quebec, INRS-ETE, 490, de la Couronne, Quebec (QC) G1K 9A9, CANADA. salaheddine_el-adlouni@ete.inrs.ca
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2007;6:40
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate
Decision Making
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Probability
Public Health
Quebec - epidemiology
Time Factors
West Nile Fever - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
In 2002, major human epidemics of West Nile Virus (WNV) were reported in five cities in the North East region of North America. The present analysis examines the climatic conditions that were conducive to the WNV epidemic, in order to provide information to public health managers who eventually must decide on the implementation of a preventive larvicide spraying program in Quebec, Canada. Two sets of variables, the first observed in the summer of 2002 and the second in the preceding winter were analysed to study their potential as explanatory variables for the emergence of the virus at epidemic levels.
Results show that the climatic conditions observed in the year 2002 have contributed to the emergence of the virus and can be observed once every forty years on average. The analysis has shown that the 2002 events observed in several North East North American cities are characterized by two main variables: the number of degree-days below -5 degrees C in the winter (DD-5) and the number of degree-days greater than 25 degrees C in the summer (DD25).
In the context of a declining rate of human and aviary infection to WNV, this element contributed to the decision to suspend the use of preventive larvicides in the province of Quebec in 2006 and for the foreseeable future. The second part of this study indicates that it is very important to estimate the risk that extreme values can be observed simultaneously in the summer and in the winter preceding the appearance of the virus. The proposed models provide important information to public health officials, weeks before the appearance of the virus, and can therefore be useful to help prevent human epidemics.
Notes
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2000 Jul-Aug;6(4):319-2810905964
Cites: J Urban Health. 2001 Jun;78(2):367-7111419587
Cites: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2004 Mar;23(3):147-5614986160
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Aug;11(8):1167-7316102302
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Oct 6;353(14):1433-616207843
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Sep;11(9):1343-5016229760
PubMed ID
17883862 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Organization and epidemiological surveillance of Western Nile fever in case of the Volgograd Region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262330
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2015 Jan-Mar;(1):20-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Monastyrskii
N V Shestopalov
V G Akimkin
Iu V Demina
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2015 Jan-Mar;(1):20-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Russia
West Nile Fever - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
West Nile virus
Abstract
Western Nile fever (WNF) is an arboviral infection of the most relevance to the Volgograd Region. The observed decreasing incidence of WNF in 2001-2006, 2008, and 2009 and a decline in the number of its severe forms are only suggestive of the temporary regression of the epidemic process in the Volgograd Region. There are prerequisites and forerunners for a complication of the epidemiological Western Nile fever situation in the Volgograd Region. The goal of the epidemiological survey of Western Nile fever is to provide necessary and sufficient information for the analysis of the epidemiological situation and to define a line of public health policy and actions when making managerial decisions.
PubMed ID
25850310 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prediction of human cases of West Nile virus by equine cases, Saskatchewan, Canada, 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168588
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2006 Oct 17;76(3-4):263-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-17-2006
Author
Rebecca L A Corrigan
Cheryl Waldner
Tasha Epp
Judith Wright
Stephen M Whitehead
Helen Bangura
Eric Young
Hugh G G Townsend
Author Affiliation
Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, 52 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5B4, Canada. rebecca.corrigan@usask.ca
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2006 Oct 17;76(3-4):263-72
Date
Oct-17-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cluster analysis
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Horse Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Horses
Humans
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Space-Time Clustering
Time Factors
West Nile Fever - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission - veterinary
West Nile virus - isolation & purification
Zoonoses
Abstract
In 2003, an outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV) occurred in Saskatchewan, Canada from July to September. One-hundred thirty-three horse cases and 947 human cases were recorded and data were analyzed retrospectively for evidence of clustering to determine if clinical infection in the horse population could be used to estimate human risk of infection with WNV. Kulldorff's scan statistic was used to identify spatial-temporal clusters in both the human and horse cases. In most areas, human clusters were not preceded by horse clusters. In one area, a significant cluster of horse cases preceded human cases by 1 week; however, 1 week does not provide sufficient time for human-health authorities to act and provide advance warning for the public.
PubMed ID
16806542 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Oct 3;163(7):878
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-2000
Author
E. Weir
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Oct 3;163(7):878
Date
Oct-3-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Mosquito control
New York City - epidemiology
West Nile Fever - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
West Nile virus - physiology
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Apr 4;162(7):103610763405
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 1999 Sep-Oct;5(5):643-5010511520
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2000 Aug 11;49(31):714-810958587
PubMed ID
11033722 View in PubMed
Less detail

[West Nile fever may even be spread to Sweden].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185299
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Apr 24;100(17):1532-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-2003
Author
Magdalena Kättström
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Sackler Medical University, Tel Aviv, Israel. magda5lena@yahoo.com
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Apr 24;100(17):1532-4
Date
Apr-24-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Birds - virology
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Reservoirs
Encephalitis, Viral - epidemiology - virology
Humans
Sweden - epidemiology
Travel
West Nile Fever - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Zoonoses - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Abstract
West Nile Virus (WNV) is a flavivirus, which was first isolated in Uganda 1937. This virus has attracted attention in the past years. WNV is one of the worlds most widespread flaviviruses and has caused recent outbreaks among humans and animals. West Nile Fever (WNF) is a mosquito borne zoonotic disease. The last decade the epidemiological pattern of the virus and the severity of the outbreaks have changed. This article reviews the epidemiological changes and current situation of WNF, presents a case report and evaluates the risk for a possible outbreak in Sweden.
PubMed ID
12756695 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2003 May 27;168(11):1443-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-2003
Author
Bob Nosal
Rosanan Pellizzari
Author Affiliation
Halton Region Health Department, Oakville, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 2003 May 27;168(11):1443-4
Date
May-27-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bird Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission - virology
Canada - epidemiology
Culicidae
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insect Vectors
Insecticides
Mosquito Control - methods
Population Surveillance - methods
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
West Nile Fever - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission - virology
West Nile virus - classification - pathogenicity
Notes
Cites: J Urban Health. 2001 Jun;78(2):359-6611419586
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Aug 21;165(4):46311531060
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2002 Aug 6;137(3):173-912160365
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2002 Sep;2(9):519-2912206968
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2002 Oct 4;51(39):877-812375687
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1992 Jul-Aug;47(4):279-841497381
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2002 Dec 20;51(50):1133-512537288
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2002 Dec 20;51(50):1135-612537289
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2003 Mar;9(3):311-2212643825
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 May 27;168(11):145512771083
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2002 Oct 4;51(39):87912375688
PubMed ID
12771077 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.