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Absence of indigenous specific West Nile virus antibodies in Tyrolean blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134646
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
S T Sonnleitner
J. Simeoni
E. Schmutzhard
M. Niedrig
F. Ploner
H. Schennach
M P Dierich
G. Walder
Author Affiliation
Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Fritz Pregl Straße 1-3/III, Innsbruck, Austria. sissyson@gmx.at
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Blood Donors
Child, Preschool
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Europe
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Neutralization Tests
West Nile Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
West Nile virus - immunology
Abstract
In the last several years, West Nile virus (WNV) was proven to be present especially in the neighboring countries of Austria, such as Italy, Hungary, and the Czech Republic, as well as in eastern parts of Austria, where it was detected in migratory and domestic birds. In summer 2010, infections with WNV were reported from Romania and northern Greece with about 150 diseased and increasingly fatal cases. We tested the sera of 1,607 blood donors from North Tyrol (Austria) and South Tyrol (Italy) for antibodies against WNV by using IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initial results of the ELISA tests showed seroprevalence rates of 46.2% in North Tyrol and 0.5% in South Tyrol, which turned out to be false-positive cross-reactions with antibodies against tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) by adjacent neutralization assays. These results indicate that seropositivity against WNV requires confirmation by neutralization assays, as cross-reactivity with TBEV is frequent and because, currently, WNV is not endemic in the study area.
PubMed ID
21556676 View in PubMed
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[Cases of West Nile fever in Novosibirsk region in 2004, and the genotyping of its viral pathogen]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78561
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2007;(1):21-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Ternovoi V A
Protopopova E V
Kononova Iu V
Ol'khovikova E A
Spiridonova E A
Akopov G D
Shestopalov A M
Loktev V B
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2007;(1):21-6
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Antibodies, Viral - immunology
Child
Female
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mice
Polymerase Chain Reaction
RNA, Viral - genetics
Siberia - epidemiology
West Nile Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
West Nile virus - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Abstract
Three cases of West Nile fever were registered for the first time in Novosibirsk region in 2004. The diagnosis was confirmed by revealing IgG against West Nile virus (three cases) and viral RNA (two cases). Sequence analysis of fragments of E protein gene showed that the virus belonged to Ia genotype.
PubMed ID
17338376 View in PubMed
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Increased pathogenicity of West Nile virus (WNV) by glycosylation of envelope protein and seroprevalence of WNV in wild birds in Far Eastern Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257133
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Dec;10(12):7144-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Hiroaki Kariwa
Ryo Murata
Masashi Totani
Kentaro Yoshii
Ikuo Takashima
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Public Health, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-18, Nishi-9, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-0818, Japan. kariwa@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Dec;10(12):7144-64
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bird Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
Birds
Glycosylation
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Siberia - epidemiology
Viral Envelope Proteins - metabolism
West Nile Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
West Nile virus - isolation & purification - pathogenicity - physiology
Abstract
In this review, we discuss the possibility that the glycosylation of West Nile (WN) virus E-protein may be associated with enhanced pathogenicity and higher replication of WN virus. The results indicate that E-protein glycosylation allows the virus to multiply in a heat-stable manner and therefore, has a critical role in enhanced viremic levels and virulence of WN virus in young-chick infection model. The effect of the glycosylation of the E protein on the pathogenicity of WN virus in young chicks was further investigated. The results indicate that glycosylation of the WN virus E protein is important for viral multiplication in peripheral organs and that it is associated with the strong pathogenicity of WN virus in birds. The micro-focus reduction neutralization test (FRNT) in which a large number of serum samples can be handled at once with a small volume (15 ?L) of serum was useful for differential diagnosis between Japanese encephalitis and WN virus infections in infected chicks. Serological investigation was performed among wild birds in the Far Eastern region of Russia using the FRNT. Antibodies specific to WN virus were detected in 21 samples of resident and migratory birds out of 145 wild bird samples in the region.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24351738 View in PubMed
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