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Acute respiratory effects and biomarkers of inflammation due to welding-derived nanoparticle aggregates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287249
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2017 Jul;90(5):451-463
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Katrin Dierschke
Christina Isaxon
Ulla B K Andersson
Eva Assarsson
Anna Axmon
Leo Stockfelt
Anders Gudmundsson
Bo A G Jönsson
Monica Kåredal
Jakob Löndahl
Joakim Pagels
Aneta Wierzbicka
Mats Bohgard
Jörn Nielsen
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2017 Jul;90(5):451-463
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biomarkers
Double-Blind Method
Dust
Humans
Interleukin-6 - analysis
Leukotriene B4 - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nanoparticles - adverse effects
Nasal Lavage
Neutrophils
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Respiratory Function Tests
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Welding
Abstract
Welders are exposed to airborne particles from the welding environment and often develop symptoms work-related from the airways. A large fraction of the particles from welding are in the nano-size range. In this study we investigate if the welders' airways are affected by exposure to particles derived from gas metal arc welding in mild steel in levels corresponding to a normal welding day.
In an exposure chamber, 11 welders with and 10 welders without work-related symptoms from the lower airways and 11 non-welders without symptoms, were exposed to welding fumes (1 mg/m3) and to filtered air, respectively, in a double-blind manner. Symptoms from eyes and upper and lower airways and lung function were registered. Blood and nasal lavage (NL) were sampled before, immediately after and the morning after exposure for analysis of markers of oxidative stress. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) for analysis of leukotriene B4 (LT-B4) was sampled before, during and immediately after exposure.
No adverse effects of welding exposure were found regarding symptoms and lung function. However, EBC LT-B4 decreased significantly in all participants after welding exposure compared to filtered air. NL IL-6 increased immediately after exposure in the two non-symptomatic groups and blood neutrophils tended to increase in the symptomatic welder group. The morning after, neutrophils and serum IL-8 had decreased in all three groups after welding exposure. Remarkably, the symptomatic welder group had a tenfold higher level of EBC LT-B4 compared to the two groups without symptoms.
Despite no clinical adverse effects at welding, changes in inflammatory markers may indicate subclinical effects even at exposure below the present Swedish threshold limit (8 h TWA respirable dust).
Notes
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PubMed ID
28258373 View in PubMed
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Air exposure assessment and biological monitoring of manganese and other major welding fume components in welders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165526
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Oct;8(10):1078-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Dag G Ellingsen
Larisa Dubeikovskaya
Kari Dahl
Maxim Chashchin
Valery Chashchin
Evgeny Zibarev
Yngvar Thomassen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, P.O. Box 8149 Dep, N-0033 Oslo, Norway. dag.ellingsen@stami.no
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Oct;8(10):1078-86
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - blood - urine
Dust - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Male
Metals - analysis - blood - urine
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Russia
Steel
Welding
Abstract
In a cross-sectional study, 96 welders were compared with 96 control subjects. Also 27 former welders, all diagnosed as having manganism, were examined. Exposure to welding fumes was determined in the 96 welders, while the concentration of elements in whole blood and urine was determined in all subjects. The geometric mean (GM) concentrations of manganese (Mn) and iron in the workroom air were 97 microg m(-3) (range 3-4620 microg m(-3); n=188) and 894 microg m(-3) (range 106-20 300 microg m(-3); n=188), respectively. Thus the Mn concentration in the workroom air was on average 10.6% (GM) of that of the Fe concentration. No substantial difference was observed in the air Mn concentrations when welding mild steel as compared to welding stainless steel. The arithmetic mean (AM) concentration of Mn in whole blood (B-Mn) was about 25% higher in the welders compared to the controls (8.6 vs. 6.9 microg l(-1); p
PubMed ID
17240914 View in PubMed
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Aluminium in the blood and urine of industrially exposed workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241674
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1983 Aug;40(3):301-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1983
Author
B. Sjögren
I. Lundberg
V. Lidums
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1983 Aug;40(3):301-4
Date
Aug-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aluminum - metabolism
Chemical Industry
Female
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Medicine
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Sweden
Welding
Abstract
Blood and urine aluminium concentrations were studied in industrially exposed workers using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Welders and workers making aluminium powder and aluminium sulphate had higher concentrations in blood and urine than non-exposed referents. Workers in the electrolytic production of aluminium had higher urine but not blood concentrations than the referents. Thus aluminium was found to be absorbed by all industrially exposed workers. Blood concentrations were lower than those presumably associated with aluminium induced encephalopathy in patients receiving dialysis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
6871119 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study of reproductive function biomarkers in male welders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161874
Source
Biomarkers. 2007 Sep-Oct;12(5):497-509
Publication Type
Article
Author
Dag G Ellingsen
Valery Chashchin
Egil Haug
Maxime Chashchin
Vitaly Tkachenko
Natalya Lubnina
Rita Bast-Pettersen
Yngvar Thomassen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway. dag.ellingsen@stami.no
Source
Biomarkers. 2007 Sep-Oct;12(5):497-509
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Infertility, Male - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Inhalation Exposure - analysis
Inhibins - blood
Male
Manganese - analysis - blood
Manganese Poisoning - blood - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Prolactin - blood
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - blood
Welding
Abstract
In a cross-sectional study, the serum concentrations of inhibin B and prolactin of 96 male current welders were compared with the concentrations measured in 96 age-matched referents. Also, 23 patients who were all former welders diagnosed as having welding-related manganism were studied. The current welders' geometric mean (GM) airborne exposure to manganese (Mn) was 121 microg m(-3) (range 7-2320). The serum concentrations of prolactin adjusted for age and smoking habits (GM 193 mIU l(-1) vs. 166 mIU l(-1); p=0.047) and inhibin B adjusted for alcohol consumption (arithmetic mean (AM) 151 ng l(-1) vs. 123 ng l(-1); p=0.001) were higher in the welders compared with the referents. The whole blood Mn concentration was associated with the serum prolactin concentrations. Tobacco smoking resulted in lower serum prolactin concentrations. The GM serum prolactin concentrations of the patients did not significantly differ from that of the referents, but their AM serum inhibin B concentration was statistically significantly lower. The results may suggest an effect of Mn on the pituitary that is reversible upon cessation of exposure. Lower inhibin B concentrations in the patients could point to a functional impairment of the testicular Sertoli cells, that may be caused by a welding fume component or other factors in their work environment.
PubMed ID
17701748 View in PubMed
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Arc and resistance welding and tumours of the endocrine glands: a Swedish case-control study with focus on extremely low frequency magnetic fields.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17070
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 May;62(5):304-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
N. Håkansson
C. Stenlund
P. Gustavsson
C. Johansen
B. Floderus
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. niclas.hakansson@imm.ki.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 May;62(5):304-8
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Air Pollutants, Occupational - toxicity
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Endocrine Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Magnetics - adverse effects
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Parathyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Pituitary Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Solvents - toxicity
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Welding
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mechanisms for potential effects of extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on carcinogenesis have not been identified. A potential pathway could be an interaction with the endocrine system. AIMS: To analyse occupational exposure to ELF magnetic fields from welding, and tumours of the endocrine glands. METHODS: This case-control study was based on a cohort with an increased prevalence of high exposed individuals. A total of 174 incident cases of tumours of the endocrine glands, 1985-94, were identified and data were obtained from 140 (80%) of these cases; 1692 controls frequency matched on sex and age were selected, and information on 1306 (77%) individuals was obtained. A short questionnaire was sent to a work administrator at the workplaces of the cases and controls. The exposure assessment was based on questions about job tasks, exposure to different types of welding, and exposure to solvents. RESULTS: There was an overall increased risk for all tumours of the endocrine glands for individuals who had been welding sometime during the follow up. The increased risk was attributable to arc welding; for resistance welding there was no clear evidence of an association. We found an increased risk for the adrenal glands in relation to arc welding, and for the parathyroid glands in relation to both arc welding and resistance welding. An imprecise increase in risk was also noted for tumours of the pituitary gland for arc welding. No confounding effect was found for solvent exposure, and there was no sign of biological interaction. CONCLUSION: The increased risks of endocrine gland tumours related to welding might be explained by exposure to high levels of ELF magnetic fields.
PubMed ID
15837851 View in PubMed
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Assessment of exposure to manganese in welding operations during the assembly of heavy excavation machinery accessories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196895
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2000 Oct;15(10):746-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
A. Smargiassi
M. Baldwin
S. Savard
G. Kennedy
D. Mergler
J. Zayed
Author Affiliation
Centre pour l'Etudes des Intéractions Biologiques entre la Santé et l'Environnement (CINBIOSE), University of Quebec, Montréal, Canada.
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2000 Oct;15(10):746-50
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dust - analysis
Equipment Design
Humans
Male
Manganese - analysis
Occupational Exposure - analysis - prevention & control
Quebec
Ventilation
Welding
Abstract
Welder exposure to metals in various industrial sectors is poorly characterized. We had the opportunity to carry out an exploratory study to characterize manganese exposure in welding operations in a recently established Quebec factory that assembled accessories for heavy excavation machinery. Ten workers were sampled for total manganese for at least two consecutive days out of three followed by two consecutive days for respirable manganese (with a size selective sampler with a median cut-off of 4 microns), during a typical week in the summer of 1998. Parts being welded were characterized as large or small. Small parts were those being welded on tables during subassembly. Workers were divided into two groups according to the parts they were welding. Seventy-eight percent of the total manganese exposure levels of welding operations during the assembly of large accessories of heavy excavation machinery exceeded the manganese American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV) of 0.20 mg/m3 (GM 0.24 mg/m3, n = 14) while none exceeded the TLV during the assembly of small pieces (GM 0.06 mg/m3, n = 8). Welding operations during the assembly of large heavy excavation machinery accessories may pose a significant health hazard. Considering the importance of task-related variables affecting exposure among workers, further studies are needed to better characterize exposure determinants of welding operations during the assembly of heavy excavation machinery accessories.
PubMed ID
11036725 View in PubMed
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Behavior of aluminum in aluminum welders and manufacturers of aluminum sulfate--impact on biological monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153218
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Dec;34(6):451-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Vesa Riihimäki
Sinikka Valkonen
Bernt Engström
Antti Tossavainen
Pertti Mutanen
Antero Aitio
Author Affiliation
Good Practices and Competence, Statistical Services, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FI-00250 Helsinki, Finland. vesa.riihimaki@ttl.fi
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Dec;34(6):451-62
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - blood - urine
Alum Compounds - analysis - metabolism
Aluminum - analysis - blood - urine
Dust - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Ships
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Welding
X-Ray Diffraction
Abstract
The suitability of determining aluminum in serum or urine as a form of biological monitoring was critically assessed.
Airborne and internal aluminum exposure was assessed for 12 aluminum welders in a shipyard and 5 manufacturers of aluminum sulfate. Particles were characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Aluminum in air and biological samples was analyzed using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Basic toxicokinetic features were inferred from the data.
The mean 8-hour time-weighted average concentration of aluminum was 1.1 (range 0.008-6.1) mg/m(3) for the shipyard and 0.13 (range 0.02-0.5) mg/m(3) for the aluminum sulfate plant. Welding fume contained aluminum oxide particles
PubMed ID
19137207 View in PubMed
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Biomonitoring of genotoxic exposure among stainless steel welders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67822
Source
Mutat Res. 1992 May 16;279(2):129-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-16-1992
Author
L E Knudsen
T. Boisen
J M Christensen
J E Jelnes
G E Jensen
J C Jensen
K. Lundgren
C. Lundsteen
B. Pedersen
K. Wassermann
Author Affiliation
Danish National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen.
Source
Mutat Res. 1992 May 16;279(2):129-43
Date
May-16-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetoxyacetylaminofluorene - metabolism - toxicity
Adult
Cell Count
Cells, Cultured
Chromium - blood - urine
Chromosome Aberrations
DNA - biosynthesis
Denmark
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Lymphocytes
Male
Middle Aged
Mutagenicity Tests
Mutagens
Nickel - blood - urine
Occupational Exposure
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sister Chromatid Exchange
Smoking
Steel
Welding
Abstract
A biosurvey in the Danish metal industry measured the genotoxic exposure from stainless steel welding. The study comprised measurements of chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE), unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in peripheral lymphocytes and serum immunoglobulin G. Environmental monitoring of welding fumes and selected metal oxides, biomonitoring of chromium and nickel in serum and urine and mutagenic activity in urine, and evaluation of semen quality were also done. Manual metal arc (MMA) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding were the dominant welding processes. A higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations, classified as translocations, double minutes, exchanges and rings, was observed in stainless steel welders than in non-welders. SCE was lower in welders working with both MMA and TIG welding than in reference persons. N-Acetoxy-N-acetylaminofluorene (NA-AAF)-induced UDS was lower in 23 never-smoking welders than in 19 unexposed never-smokers. Smoking was a confounding factor resulting in significantly higher CA, SCE, NA-AAF binding to DNA and mutagenic activity in urine. Age was also a confounder: CA, SCE, NA-AAF binding to DNA and UDS increased significantly with age. No significant correlation between SCE and CA or between CA and UDS was found. UDS decreased significantly with increasing lymphocyte count and a higher lymphocyte count was seen in MMA welders than in reference persons and in smokers than in non-smokers. Differences in the composition among lymphocytes in exposed persons compared with non-exposed are suggested. MMA welding gave the highest exposure to chromium, an increased number of chromosomal aberrations and a decrease in SCE when compared with TIG welding. Consequently improvements in the occupational practice of stainless steel welding with MMA is recommended.
PubMed ID
1375338 View in PubMed
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[Blood pressure in aluminum plant workers employed in high and in normal temperature sections in Ardal].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244004
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1981 Nov 30;101(33):1892-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1981

Body burden of aluminum in relation to central nervous system function among metal inert-gas welders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198549
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Apr;26(2):118-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
V. Riihimäki
H. Hänninen
R. Akila
T. Kovala
E. Kuosma
H. Paakkulainen
S. Valkonen
B. Engström
Author Affiliation
Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki. vesa.riihimaki@occuphelath.fi
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Apr;26(2):118-30
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aluminum - adverse effects - blood - urine
Body Burden
Central Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Depressive Disorder - chemically induced
Electroencephalography
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Fatigue - chemically induced
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Memory Disorders - chemically induced
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupational Health
Probability
Risk assessment
Welding
Abstract
The relationship between elevated internal aluminum loads and central nervous system function was studied among aluminum welders, and the threshold level for adverse effect was defined.
For 65 aluminum welders and 25 current mild steel welders body burden was estimated, and the aluminum concentrations in serum (S-Al) and urine (U-Al) were analyzed with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background correction. Referents and low-exposure and high-exposure groups were defined according to an aggregated measure of aluminum body burden, the group median S-Al levels being 0.08, 0.14, and 0.46 micromol/l, respectively, and the corresponding values for U-Al being 0.4, 1.8, and 7.1 micromol/l. Central nervous system functions were assessed with a neuropsychological test battery, symptom and mood questionnaires, a visual and quantitative analysis of electroencephalography (EEG), and P3 event-related potentials with pitch and duration paradigms.
Subjective symptoms showed exposure-related increases in fatigue, mild depression, and memory and concentration problems. Neuropsychological testing revealed a circumscribed effect of aluminum, mainly in tasks demanding complex attention and the processing of information in the working memory system and in the analysis and recall of abstract visual patterns. The visual EEG analysis revealed pathological findings only for aluminum welders. Mild, diffuse abnormalities were found in 17% of the low-exposure group and 27% of the high-exposure group, and mild to moderate epileptiform abnormalities at a frequency of 7% and 17%, respectively.
Both objective neurophysiological and neuropsychological measures and subjective symptomatology indicated mild but unequivocal findings dose-dependently associated with increased aluminum body burden. The study indicates that the body burden threshold for adverse effect approximates an U-Al value of 4-6 micromol/l and an S-Al value of 0.25-0.35 micromol/l among aluminum welders.
PubMed ID
10817377 View in PubMed
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99 records – page 1 of 10.