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A 4-fold risk of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia: the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49604
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 May;66(5):559-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Kaisa M Saari
Sari M Lindeman
Kaisa M Viilo
Matti K Isohanni
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Liisa H Laurén
Markku J Savolainen
Hannu J Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. kaisa.saari@oulu.fi
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 May;66(5):559-63
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diet Therapy
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Schizophrenia is associated with a shortened life expectancy and increased somatic comorbidity with, e.g., cardiovascular disorders. One major risk factor for these disorders is the metabolic syndrome, which has been reported to have a higher frequency in schizophrenic patients. Our objective was to study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a population-based birth cohort. METHOD: The study sample consisted of 5613 members of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort who participated in the field study from 1997 to 1998. Subjects were divided into 4 diagnostic categories (DSM-III-R): (1) schizophrenia (N = 31), (2) other functional psychoses (N = 22), (3) nonpsychotic disorders (N = 105), and (4) no psychiatric hospital treatment (N = 5455, comparison group). Subjects were assessed for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program. RESULTS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher in subjects with schizophrenia compared with the comparison group (19% vs. 6%, p = .010). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in subjects with other psychoses was 5%. After controlling for sex, the results of logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia was 3.7 (95% CI = 1.5 to 9.0). CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia even at such a relatively young age underscores the need to select antipsychotic medications with no or little capability to induce metabolic side effects. Also, developing comprehensive efforts directed at controlling weight and diet and improving physical activity are needed.
PubMed ID
15889940 View in PubMed
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The 2005 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part II - therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173954
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Nadia A Khan
Finlay A McAlister
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Rhian M Touyz
Raj Padwal
Simon W Rabkin
Lawrence A Leiter
Marcel Lebel
Carol Herbert
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Robert J Herman
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Bruce Culleton
Jacques DeChamplain
George Pylypchuk
Alexander G Logan
Norm Gledhill
Robert Petrella
Norman R C Campbell
Malcolm Arnold
Gordon Moe
Micharl D Hill
Charlotte Jones
Pierre Larochelle
Richard I Ogilvie
Sheldon Tobe
Robyn Houlden
Ellen Burgess
Ross D Feldman
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-72
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Diet
Evidence-Based Medicine
Exercise
Humans
Hypertension - therapy
Patient Education as Topic
Weight Loss
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension in adults.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. While changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity/mortality data in this field, and for certain comorbid conditions, other relevant outcomes, such as development of proteinuria or worsening of kidney function, were considered.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2003 to October 2004 to update the 2004 recommendations. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content and methodology experts. As per previous years, only studies that had been published in the peer-reviewed literature were included; evidence from abstracts, conference presentations and unpublished personal communications was not included.
Lifestyle modifications to prevent and/or treat hypertension include the following: perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise on four to seven days of the week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 units per week in men or nine units per week in women; follow a reduced fat, low cholesterol diet with an adequate intake of potassium, magnesium and calcium; restrict salt intake; and consider stress management (in selected individuals). Treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and any comorbid conditions. Blood pressure should be lowered to 140/90 mmHg or less in all patients, and to 130/80 mmHg or less in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. Most adults with hypertension require more than one agent to achieve target blood pressures. For adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic hypertension with or without systolic hypertension include beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (except in black patients), long-acting calcium channel blockers and angiotensin receptor antagonists. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and angiotensin receptor antagonists. Certain comorbid conditions provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists (or thiazides in patients with diabetes mellitus without albuminuria) are appropriate first-line therapies; and in patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended. All hypertensive patients should have their fasting lipids screened, and those with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents recommended by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Working Group on the management of dyslipidemia and the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Selected patients with hypertension, but without dyslipidemia, should also receive statin therapy and/or acetylsalicylic acid therapy.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the 43 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
PubMed ID
16003449 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part II - Therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168976
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2006
Author
N A Khan
Finlay A McAlister
Simon W Rabkin
Raj Padwal
Ross D Feldman
Norman Rc Campbell
Lawrence A Leiter
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Michael D Hill
Malcolm Arnold
Gordon Moe
Tavis S Campbell
Carol Herbert
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Ellen Burgess
B. Hemmelgarn
Charlotte Jones
Pierre Larochelle
Richard I Ogilvie
Robyn Houlden
Robert J Herman
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Bruce Culleton
Jacques Dechamplain
George Pylypchuk
Alexander G Logan
Norm Gledhill
Robert Petrella
Sheldon Tobe
Rhian M Touyz
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Date
May-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Alcohol Drinking
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Canada
Cerebrovascular Disorders - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Diet
Exercise
Humans
Hypertension - therapy
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - therapy
Kidney Diseases - therapy
Life Style
Magnesium - administration & dosage
Myocardial Ischemia - therapy
Patient compliance
Potassium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Weight Loss
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension in adults.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. For lifestyle interventions, blood pressure (BP) lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity/mortality data in this field. For treatment of patients with kidney disease, the development of proteinuria or worsening of kidney function was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2004 to October 2005 to update the 2005 recommendations. In addition, reference lists were scanned and experts were contacted to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
Lifestyle modifications to prevent and/or treat hypertension include the following: perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 standard drinks per week in men or nine standard drinks per week in women; follow a diet that is reduced in saturated fat and cholesterol and that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products; restrict salt intake; and consider stress management in selected individuals. Treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbid conditions. BP should be lowered to less than 140/90 mmHg in all patients, and to less than 130/80 mmHg in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (regardless of the degree of proteinuria). Most adults with hypertension require more than one agent to achieve these target BPs. For adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic hypertension with or without systolic hypertension include beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (in nonblack patients), long-acting calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Other agents for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Certain comorbid conditions provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists (or in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers) are appropriate first-line therapies; and in patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended. All hypertensive patients should have their fasting lipids screened, and those with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents recommended by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Working Group on the management of dyslipidemia and the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Selected patients with hypertension, but without dyslipidemia, should also receive statin therapy and/or acetylsalicylic acid therapy.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 45 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jan 21;367(9506):209; author reply 21016427487
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2000 Sep;16(9):1094-10211021953
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2001 May;17(5):543-5911381277
Cites: Am J Med. 2001 Nov;111(7):553-811705432
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Cites: J Hypertens. 2003 Jun;21(6):1055-7612777939
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Cites: Congest Heart Fail. 2003 Nov-Dec;9(6):324-3214688505
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Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2004 Feb;93(2-3):105-1114975535
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 May 24;164(10):1084-9115159265
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Cites: Am J Hypertens. 1997 Oct;10(10 Pt 1):1097-1029370379
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Oct 24;352(9137):1347-519802273
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Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2004 Dec;82(12):935-915654408
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Mar 12-18;365(9463):939-4615766995
Cites: Stroke. 2005 Jun;36(6):1218-2615879332
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jun 27;165(12):1401-915983290
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-7216003449
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Sep 10-16;366(9489):895-90616154016
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Cites: Pharmacotherapy. 2000 Apr;20(4):410-610772372
PubMed ID
16755313 View in PubMed
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Aberrations in plasma phospholipid fatty acids in lung cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128904
Source
Lipids. 2012 Apr;47(4):363-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Rachel A Murphy
Taylor F Bureyko
Marina Mourtzakis
Quincy S Chu
M Thomas Clandinin
Tony Reiman
Vera C Mazurak
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, 4-126A Li Ka Shing Centre, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
Source
Lipids. 2012 Apr;47(4):363-9
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - drug therapy - metabolism - mortality
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Body mass index
Canada
Fatty Acids - analysis
Female
Humans
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Longitudinal Studies
Lung Neoplasms - drug therapy - metabolism - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Phospholipids - analysis
Survival Rate
Weight Loss
Abstract
Abnormalities in lipid metabolism have been frequently observed in cancer and are associated with a poor prognosis. However, a detailed, longitudinal characterization of fatty acid status is lacking. This study aimed to assess plasma phospholipid fatty acids before chemotherapy, immediately after and 1 month following chemotherapy in a group of 50 patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer and explore factors which may contribute to aberrations in fatty acids. Their mean ± SD characteristics: age 64 ± 8.5 years, 75% advanced stage disease, body mass index 27.0 ± 5.4 kg/m², 6 month weight loss -4.6 ± 6.1%. Compared to patients with early stage disease, patients with advanced disease had abnormal fatty acid profiles including significantly lower (P
PubMed ID
22160451 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ability and accuracy of long-term weight recall by elderly males: the Manitoba follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161375
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2008 Jan;18(1):36-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Dennis J Bayomi
Robert B Tate
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Follow-up Study, Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. Dennis_Bayomi@umanitoba.ca
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2008 Jan;18(1):36-42
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Body Weight
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba
Memory - physiology
Mental Recall - physiology
Questionnaires
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Abstract
To assess the ability and accuracy of elderly men to recall their weights and determine what characteristics might predict recall ability and accuracy.
Eight hundred sixty-nine elderly men (mean age, 84 years), participants of the Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS), responded to a questionnaire asking them to recall their weights at ages 20, 30, 50, and 65 years. Recalled weights were compared with measured weights collected since MFUS began in 1948. Logistic regression was used to predict ability and accuracy of weight recall.
Only 75% of respondents attempted to recall their weights at all 4 ages. Among men recalling 4 weights, fewer than half were accurate within +/- 10%, just 7% were within +/- 5% of their measured weights. Accuracy of recall was significantly and independently associated with body mass index during middle age (5 kg/m(2)) (odds ratio 0.83, 95% confidence interval: 0.76, 0.90) and weight change. Unmarried men were less likely than married men to attempt recalling all 4 weights. Men overweight at middle age were more likely to underestimate their recalled weights.
Studies relating weight in early adulthood or middle age with outcomes in later life should not rely on elderly male participants recalling those weights.
PubMed ID
17855121 View in PubMed
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[A comment: the core question for obese persons is quality of life. The Malmö study should not result in therapeutic nihilism].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197995
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 May 24;97(21):2648
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-2000
Author
S. Rössner
Author Affiliation
Huddinge Universitetssjukhus. stephan.rossner@medhs.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 May 24;97(21):2648
Date
May-24-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic
Humans
Obesity - psychology - therapy
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Sweden
Weight Loss
PubMed ID
10881530 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute and chronic effects of biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch surgery on plasma visfatin and apelin levels in patients with severe obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114747
Source
Obes Surg. 2013 Nov;23(11):1806-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Sarah-Maude Caron-Cantin
Julie Martin
Marjorie Bastien
Mercedes Nancy Munkonda
Huiling Lu
Katherine Cianflone
Fady Moustarah
Laurent Biertho
Simon Marceau
Frédéric-Simon Hould
Jean Bussières
Paul Poirier
Author Affiliation
Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, 2725 Chemin Sainte-Foy, Quebec City, QC, Canada, G1V 4G5.
Source
Obes Surg. 2013 Nov;23(11):1806-14
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism - surgery
Adult
Apolipoproteins B - metabolism
Biliopancreatic Diversion
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cholesterol, LDL - metabolism
Cytokines - blood
Duodenum - surgery
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Inflammation - epidemiology - metabolism
Insulin Resistance
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - blood
Male
Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase - blood
Obesity, Morbid - blood - epidemiology - surgery
Quebec - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
Visfatin is an adipokine linked to obesity and inflammation, and it has insulin-mimetic properties. Apelin is an adipokine with positive cardiac inotropic effects, and it may be related to inflammatory molecules. Variations in plasma visfatin and apelin levels following bariatric surgery remain controversial.
In this study, patients who underwent a biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) were compared to a severely obese group (control group). Anthropometric measures and blood samples were taken before surgery, on days 1 and 5, as well as at 6 and 12 months after surgery in the BDP-DS group. For the control group, the tests were performed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months.
Seventy subjects in the BPD-DS group and 28 in the control group were included. The expected reduction in body weight at 1 year after a BPD-DS was observed (85.9?±?18.5 vs. 136.6?±?27.7 kg at baseline; p?
PubMed ID
23585024 View in PubMed
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Additive effects of the mutations in the beta3-adrenergic receptor and uncoupling protein-1 genes on weight loss and weight maintenance in Finnish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203645
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1998 Dec;83(12):4246-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
M. Fogelholm
R. Valve
K. Kukkonen-Harjula
A. Nenonen
V. Hakkarainen
M. Laakso
M. Uusitupa
Author Affiliation
The UKK Institute for Health Promotion and Research, Tampere, Finland. mikael.fogelholm@helsinki.fi
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1998 Dec;83(12):4246-50
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amino Acid Sequence
Base Sequence
Body Weight - physiology
Carrier Proteins - genetics
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Ion Channels
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Mitochondrial Proteins
Mutation - genetics - physiology
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta - genetics
Weight Loss - physiology
Abstract
This study examined whether the Trp64Arg mutation in the beta3-adrenergic receptor (beta3AR) and the A-->G mutation in the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) genes have associations with weight loss and subsequent weight maintenance. Seventy-seven obese (body mass index range, 29-46 kg/m2), clinically healthy, premenopausal women were studied. A 12-wk weight reduction by very low calorie diet (VLCD) was followed by a 40-wk weight maintenance phase. The subjects were divided into four groups according to their beta3AR and UCP-1 genotype: no mutation (control; n=37), only Trp64Arg mutation in the beta3AR gene (n=12), only A-->G mutation in the UCP-1 gene (n=23), and both mutations (n=5). Subjects with both mutations had a lower weight reduction during VLCD than the controls [-10.5+/-0.6 (+/-SEM) vs. -14.0+/-0.5 kg; P=0.051, by ANOVA]. During the maintenance phase, weight in subjects with both mutations increased by 5.8+/-1.5 kg, but remained unchanged in the controls (-0.5+/-0.8 kg; P=0.041). The changes in weight in subjects with only one of the mutation were close to the results in the controls. Resting energy expenditure, adjusted for fat mass, fat-free mass, and maximal aerobic power, did not change differently between the groups throughout the study. The results suggest that a combination of the Trp64Arg mutation in the beta3AR and the A-->G mutation in the UCP-1 genes may be associated with faster weight gain after a VLCD.
PubMed ID
9851758 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue morphology predicts improved insulin sensitivity following moderate or pronounced weight loss.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272781
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Jun;39(6):893-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
D. Eriksson-Hogling
D P Andersson
J. Bäckdahl
J. Hoffstedt
S. Rössner
A. Thorell
E. Arner
P. Arner
M. Rydén
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Jun;39(6):893-8
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipocytes - metabolism - pathology
Adipose Tissue, White - metabolism - pathology
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Cell Enlargement
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology - metabolism - prevention & control
Diet, Reducing
Female
Humans
Inflammation - etiology - metabolism
Male
Obesity - complications - metabolism - pathology - surgery
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Sweden
Weight Loss
Abstract
Cross-sectional studies show that white adipose tissue hypertrophy (few, large adipocytes), in contrast to hyperplasia (many, small adipocytes), associates with insulin resistance and increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. We investigated if baseline adipose cellularity could predict improvements in insulin sensitivity following weight loss.
Plasma samples and subcutaneous abdominal adipose biopsies were examined in 100 overweight or obese individuals before and 10 weeks after a hypocaloric diet (7±3% weight loss) and in 61 obese subjects before and 2 years after gastric by-pass surgery (33±9% weight loss). The degree of adipose tissue hypertrophy or hyperplasia (termed the morphology value) in each individual was calculated on the basis of the relationship between fat cell volume and total fat mass. Insulin sensitivity was determined by homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMAIR).
In both cohorts at baseline, subjects with hypertrophy displayed significantly higher fasting plasma insulin and HOMAIR values than subjects with hyperplasia (P
PubMed ID
25666530 View in PubMed
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Adiposity, education and weight loss effort are independently associated with energy reporting quality in the Ontario Food Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164471
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Aug;10(8):803-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Heather Ward
Valerie Tarasuk
Rena Mendelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, 150 College St, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Aug;10(8):803-9
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Basal Metabolism
Body mass index
Educational Status
Energy Intake - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - epidemiology - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Self Disclosure
Weight Loss
Abstract
To examine the associations of adiposity, dietary restraint and other personal characteristics with energy reporting quality.
Secondary analysis of 230 women and 158 men from the 1997/98 Ontario Food Survey.
Energy reporting quality was estimated by ratios of energy intake (EI) to both basal metabolic rate (BMR) and total energy expenditure (TEE). Multivariate regression analyses were conducted to examine energy reporting quality between two dietary recalls and in relation to body mass index (BMI) with adjustment for potential confounders. Energy reporting quality was explored across categories of age, BMI, income, education, dieting status and food insecurity through analysis of variance (ANOVA).
From the ANOVA, energy reporting quality was associated with BMI group, age category and weight loss for men and women, as well as with education among women (P 0.05). EI:BMR and EI:TEE on the first and second 24-hour recalls were positively related (P
PubMed ID
17381922 View in PubMed
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567 records – page 1 of 57.