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Association between maternal weight gain and birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77536
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2007 Jun;109(6):1309-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Rode Line
Hegaard Hanne K
Kjaergaard Hanne
Møller Lars F
Tabor Ann
Ottesen Bent
Author Affiliation
Ultrasound Clinic 4002, Department of Fetal Medicine, Rigshospitalet, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hvidovre Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. linerode@dadlnet.dk
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2007 Jun;109(6):1309-15
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body mass index
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Maternal Nutrition Physiology - physiology
Obesity - physiopathology
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Risk factors
Thinness - physiopathology
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between maternal weight gain and birth weight less than 3,000 g and greater than or equal to 4,000 g in underweight (body mass index [BMI] less than 19.8 kg/m(2)), normal weight (BMI 19.8-26.0 kg/m(2)), overweight (BMI 26.1-29.0 kg/m(2)), and obese (BMI greater than 29.0 kg/m(2)) women, with emphasis on the use of the American Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations in Denmark. METHODS: We analyzed data from 2,248 women with singleton, term pregnancies. The relationship between weight gain and risk of birth weight less than 3,000 g and greater than or equal to 4,000 g was examined in the four BMI groups, and use of IOM recommendations was tested by logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: We found an inverse relationship between maternal weight gain and the proportion of infants with a birth weight less than 3,000 g. Birth weight greater than or equal to 4,000 g increased with an increasing weight gain in underweight and normal-weight women, but the association was less apparent in overweight and obese women. Underweight women seemed to benefit from gaining more weight than recommended by the IOM, because the odds ratio (OR) of birth weight less than 3,000 g was 0.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.1-0.9) and the OR was 1.7 for birthweight greater than or equal to 4,000 g (95% CI 0.8-3.6). The normal-weight women had an increased risk of birth weight less than 3,000 g (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.5-3.7) if weight gain was below the recommended range, and the OR of birth weight greater than or equal to 4,000 g was 1.9 (95% CI 1.5-2.5) when the women gained more than recommended. CONCLUSION: The IOM recommendations may provide a basis for Danish recommendations to pregnant women, although the upper recommended limit for underweight women may have to be increased.
PubMed ID
17540802 View in PubMed
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The association of body mass index, weight gain and central obesity with activity-related breathlessness: the Swedish Cardiopulmonary Bioimage Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310016
Source
Thorax. 2019 10; 74(10):958-964
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2019
Author
Magnus Pär Ekström
Anders Blomberg
Göran Bergström
John Brandberg
Kenneth Caidahl
Gunnar Engström
Jan Engvall
Maria Eriksson
Klas Gränsbo
Tomas Hansen
Tomas Jernberg
Lars Nilsson
Ulf Nilsson
Anna-Carin Olin
Lennart Persson
Annika Rosengren
Martin Sandelin
Magnus Sköld
Johan Sundström
Eva Swahn
Stefan Söderberg
Hanan A Tanash
Kjell Torén
Carl Johan Östgren
Eva Lindberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Lund University, Faculty of Medicine, Lund, Sweden pmekstrom@gmail.com.
Source
Thorax. 2019 10; 74(10):958-964
Date
10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dyspnea - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Incidence
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prognosis
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
Breathlessness is common in the population, especially in women and associated with adverse health outcomes. Obesity (body mass index (BMI) >30?kg/m2) is rapidly increasing globally and its impact on breathlessness is unclear.
This population-based study aimed primarily to evaluate the association of current BMI and self-reported change in BMI since age 20 with breathlessness (modified Research Council score =1) in the middle-aged population. Secondary aims were to evaluate factors that contribute to breathlessness in obesity, including the interaction with spirometric lung volume and sex.
We included 13?437 individuals; mean age 57.5 years; 52.5% women; mean BMI 26.8 (SD 4.3); mean BMI increase since age 20 was 5.0?kg/m2; and 1283 (9.6%) reported breathlessness. Obesity was strongly associated with increased breathlessness, OR 3.54 (95% CI, 3.03 to 4.13) independent of age, sex, smoking, airflow obstruction, exercise level and the presence of comorbidities. The association between BMI and breathlessness was modified by lung volume; the increase in breathlessness prevalence with higher BMI was steeper for individuals with lower forced vital capacity (FVC). The higher breathlessness prevalence in obese women than men (27.4% vs 12.5%; p
PubMed ID
31434752 View in PubMed
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Associations between long-term physical activity, waist circumference and weight gain: a 30-year longitudinal twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162296
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Feb;32(2):353-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
K. Waller
J. Kaprio
U M Kujala
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. katja.waller@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Feb;32(2):353-61
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Size - physiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Twins, Dizygotic - physiology
Twins, Monozygotic - physiology
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
Physical activity level and obesity are both partly determined by genes and childhood environment. To determine the associations between long-term leisure-time physical activity, weight gain and waist circumference and whether these are independent of genes and childhood effects.
The study design is a 30-year follow-up twin study in Finland. For this study, 146 twin pairs were comprehensively identified from the large Finnish Twin Cohort. These twin pairs were discordant for both intensity and volume of leisure physical activity in 1975 and 1981 and were healthy in 1981. At follow-up in 2005, both members of 89 pairs were alive and participated in a structured telephone interview. In the interview self-measured weight and waist circumference, and physical activity level for the whole follow-up were assessed. Paired tests were used in the statistical analyses.
Waist circumference at 30-year follow-up (2005) and change in weight from 1975 to 2005.
In the 42 twin pairs discordant for physical activity at all time points during the 30-year period, the mean weight gain from 1975 through 2005 was 5.4 kg (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0-8.9) less in the active compared to inactive co-twins (paired t-test, P=0.003). In 2005, the mean waist circumference was 8.4 cm (95% CI 4.0-12.7) less in the active compared with inactive co-twins (P
PubMed ID
17653065 View in PubMed
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Associations between pre-pregnancy obesity and asthma symptoms in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132143
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Sep;66(9):809-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Swatee P Patel
Alina Rodriguez
Mark P Little
Paul Elliott
Juha Pekkanen
Anna-Liisa Hartikainen
Anneli Pouta
Jaana Laitinen
Terttu Harju
Dexter Canoy
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Sep;66(9):809-14
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology - pathology
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Logistic Models
Obesity - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Prenatal Diagnosis - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - diagnosis
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
The high prevalence of children's asthma symptoms, worldwide, is unexplained. We examined the relation between maternal pre-pregnancy weight and body mass index (BMI), and asthma symptoms in adolescents.
Data from 6945 adolescents born within the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 were used. Prospective antenatal and birth outcome data, including maternal pre-pregnancy weight and BMI, and asthma symptoms in adolescent offspring at age 15-16 years, were employed. Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the associations between relevant prenatal factors and asthma symptoms during adolescence.
Current wheeze (within the past year) was reported by 10.6% of adolescents, and physician-diagnosed asthma by 6.0%. High maternal pre-pregnancy BMI was a significant predictor of wheeze in the adolescents (increase per kilogram per square metre unit; 2.7%, 95% CI 0.9 to 4.4 for ever wheeze; 3.5%, 95% CI 1.3 to 5.8 for current wheeze), and adjusting for potential confounders further increased the risk (2.8%, 95% CI 0.5 to 5.1; 4.7%, 95% CI 1.9 to 7.7, respectively). High maternal pre-pregnancy weight, in the top tertile, also significantly increased the odds of current wheeze in the adolescent by 20% (95% CI 4 to 39), and adjusting for potential confounders further increased the risk (OR=1.52, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.95). Results were similar for current asthma. Furthermore, these significant associations were observed only among adolescents without parental history of atopy but not among those with parental history of atopy.
The association demonstrated here between maternal pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity, and asthma symptoms in adolescents suggests that increase in asthma may be partly related to the rapid rise in obesity in recent years.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21844604 View in PubMed
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[A woman's weight before and during pregnancy is of importance to her infant. USA guidelines would benefit public health in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30568
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Nov 27;100(48):3954-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-2003
Author
Elisabet Forsum
Karin Boström
Britt Eriksson
Sabina Olin-Skoglund
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för nutrition, institutionen för biomedicin och kirurgi, Linköpings universitet. EliFo@ibk.liu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Nov 27;100(48):3954-8
Date
Nov-27-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
English Abstract
Female
Guidelines
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal health services
Obesity - etiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy - physiology
Pregnancy Complications - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden
United States
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
This paper describes weight gain during pregnancy in Sweden in relation to guidelines from the United States. These guidelines take into consideration the fact that optimal weight gain during pregnancy is related to the woman's prepregnant weight in relation to her height. Almost 50 per cent of women delivering babies in Sweden during the year 2000 were obese or overweight. In the three populations studied, less than 50 per cent gained weight in accordance with the US guidelines, while more than 20 per cent gained less weight than recommended. The results indicate that, in Sweden, more attention should be paid to the body weight of women who bear children.
PubMed ID
14717089 View in PubMed
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Back on track-Smoking cessation and weight changes over 9 years in a community-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275028
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Dec;81:320-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Rasmus Køster-Rasmussen
Caroline Amalie Permin
Volkert Siersma
Jan Erik Henriksen
Berit Lilienthal Heitmann
Poul Erik Heldgaard
Niels de Fine Olivarius
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Dec;81:320-5
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Smoking - physiopathology
Smoking Cessation
Weight Gain - physiology
Weight Loss - physiology
Abstract
To examine the impact of smoking cessation on body weight compared with normal long-term weight development.
Of 1970 adults (20-69 years) in a rural town in Denmark invited to take part in the study in 1998-2000, 1374 (70%) participated. After 9 years, 1121 participated in the follow-up study. Weight changes were compared using multivariable regression models.
The mean baseline weight of never-smokers was 76.4 kg (SD 16.0). The adjusted weight of smokers and ex-smokers differed by -4.2 kg (95% CI: -5.9, -2.6), and -0.7 kg (95% CI: -2.5, 1.1), respectively. The adjusted weight gain rate (kg/year) of never-smokers, smokers, and ex-smokers was 0.213, 0.127, and 0.105, respectively. The absolute post cessation weight gain (PCWG) was 5.0 kg (SD 7.0), and the adjusted PCWG was 2.8 kg (95% CI: 1.7, 3.9) compared with never-smokers, and 3.5 kg (95% CI: 2.3, 4.8) compared with smokers. The follow-up weight did not differ between quitters and never-smokers (0.1 kg; 95% CI: -2.4, 2.6).
Smokers weigh less than never-smokers. By quitting, they gain weight and end up weighing the same as comparable never-smokers. Weight gain rates differ by smoking status. Consequently, PCWG depends on the length of follow-up. Our graphical model indicates that smoking cessation results in a return to normal weight development.
PubMed ID
26441298 View in PubMed
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Both Weight at Age 20 and Weight Gain Have an Impact on Sleep Disturbances Later in Life: Results of the EpiHealth Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300975
Source
Sleep. 2018 01 01; 41(1):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-01-2018
Author
Gui-Hong Cai
Christer Janson
Jenny Theorell-Haglöw
Christian Benedict
Sölve Elmståhl
Lars Lind
Eva Lindberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Sleep. 2018 01 01; 41(1):
Date
01-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - pathology
Risk factors
Self Report
Sleep
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - pathology
Sleep Wake Disorders - pathology
Smoking
Snoring - physiopathology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Thinness - pathology
Weight Gain - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Obesity is often associated with impaired sleep, whereas the impact of body mass index (BMI) at younger age and previous weight gain on sleep problems remains unknown.
The present study utilized data from the Swedish EpiHealth cohort study. A total of 15845 participants (45-75 years) filled out an internet-based questionnaire. BMI was calculated from both measured data at study time and self-reported data at age 20 from the questionnaire.
Sleep-related symptoms were most common among obese individuals (BMI > 30 kg/m2). An association between weight gain and sleep problems was found and those with a low BMI at age 20 were most vulnerable to weight gain when it came to risk of sleep problems. Among those who were underweight (BMI
PubMed ID
29361188 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding reduces postpartum weight retention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90913
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Dec;88(6):1543-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Baker Jennifer L
Gamborg Michael
Heitmann Berit L
Lissner Lauren
Sørensen Thorkild I A
Rasmussen Kathleen M
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health and Society, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen, Denmark. jba@ipm.regionh.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Dec;88(6):1543-51
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Breast Feeding
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Lactation - metabolism - physiology
Postpartum Period - physiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Weight Gain - physiology
Weight Loss - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Weight gained during pregnancy and not lost postpartum may contribute to obesity in women of childbearing age. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine whether breastfeeding reduces postpartum weight retention (PPWR) in a population among which full breastfeeding is common and breastfeeding duration is long. DESIGN: We selected women from the Danish National Birth Cohort who ever breastfed (>98%), and we conducted the interviews at 6 (n = 36 030) and 18 (n = 26 846) mo postpartum. We used regression analyses to investigate whether breastfeeding (scored to account for duration and intensity) reduced PPWR at 6 and 18 mo after adjustment for maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG). RESULTS: GWG was positively (P or=5 kg) could be reduced in all but the heaviest women. CONCLUSION: Breastfeeding was associated with lower PPWR in all categories of prepregnancy BMI. These results suggest that, when combined with GWG values of approximately 12 kg, breastfeeding as recommended could eliminate weight retention by 6 mo postpartum in many women.
PubMed ID
19064514 View in PubMed
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Changes in blood pressure and body weight following smoking cessation in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67272
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Feb;255(2):266-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
E. Janzon
B. Hedblad
G. Berglund
G. Engström
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Division of Epidemiology, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. Ellis.Janzon@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Feb;255(2):266-72
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Pressure - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Smoking Cessation
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Few have studied the long-term effects of smoking and smoking cessation on weight gain and blood pressure increase and compared with the age-related increases experienced by most adults. This study compared the development of weight and blood pressure in female never smokers, continuing smokers and smokers who quit smoking. DESIGN: Weight, systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure and smoking habits were assessed at baseline and re-assessed after a mean follow-up of 9.0 +/- 5.8 years. SETTING: Population-based cohort. SUBJECTS: A total of 2381 female never smokers and 1550 female smokers. At the re-examination, 388 of the smokers had quit smoking. RESULTS: Mean weight gain was 7.6 +/- 6.1, 3.2 +/- 5.8 and 3.7 +/- 5.2 kg, respectively, in quitters, continuing smokers and never smokers (P or = 160/95 mmHg or treatment) was significantly higher in quitters [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.8; CI: 1.4-2.5] when compared with continuing smokers (OR: 1.3; CI: 1.07-1.6) and never smokers (reference). CONCLUSION: Over a long follow-up, weight gain was approximately 3-4 kg higher in quitters when compared with continuing smokers or never smokers. Although the differences in blood pressure increase were moderate, smoking cessation was associated with an increased incidence of hypertension.
PubMed ID
14746564 View in PubMed
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Cigarette smoking in pregnancy and fetal growth. Does the type of tobacco play a role?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64979
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1992 Apr;21(2):279-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social Medicine, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1992 Apr;21(2):279-84
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - etiology
Humans
Nicotine - adverse effects
Pregnancy - physiology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - adverse effects
Smoking Cessation
Time Factors
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
The effect of nicotine content of cigarettes on fetal growth was studied. From April 1985 to April 1987, 86% of all pregnant women in two well-defined geographical areas responded to a questionnaire on social conditions and lifestyle factors in pregnancy. After excluding multiple births and women who gave birth after elective caesarean section, 10,485 pregnant women were available for the study. Results showed that not only smoking, but also nicotine content in cigarettes was related to reduced fetal growth as measured by birthweight, birth length, and head circumference. The timing of smoking during pregnancy played a role. Smoking before pregnancy or smoking early in pregnancy was not related to fetal growth, nor were the partners' smoking habits. The study corroborates the hypothesis that smoking reduces fetal growth and points to nicotine as one of the potential causal factors.
PubMed ID
1428481 View in PubMed
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67 records – page 1 of 7.