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A 10-year follow-up of snoring in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10800
Source
Chest. 1998 Oct;114(4):1048-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
E. Lindberg
A. Taube
C. Janson
T. Gislason
K. Svärdsudd
G. Boman
Author Affiliation
Department of Lung Medicine and Asthma Research Centre, Uppsala University, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Sweden.
Source
Chest. 1998 Oct;114(4):1048-55
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Snoring - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Gain
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Little is known about the natural development of snoring, and this survey was conducted to study the development of snoring in men over a 10-year period. DESIGN: Population-based prospective survey. SETTING: The Municipality of Uppsala, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS: In 1984, 3,201 randomly selected men aged 30 to 69 years answered a questionnaire on snoring and sleep disturbances. Of the 2,975 survivors in 1994, 2,668 (89.7%) answered a new questionnaire with identical questions to those used at baseline. Questions about smoking habits, alcohol, and physical activity were also added. RESULTS: Habitual snoring was reported by 393 men (15.0%) in 1984 and by 529 (20.4%) 10 years later. In both 1984 and 1994, the prevalence of snoring increased until age 50 to 60 years and then decreased. Risk factors for being a habitual snorer at the follow-up were investigated using multiple logistic regression with adjustments for previous snoring status, age, body mass index (BMI), weight gain, smoking habits, and physical activity. In men aged 30 to 49 years at baseline, the predictors of habitual snoring at the follow-up, in addition to previous snoring status, were as follows: persistent smoking (adjusted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval) (1.4, 1.1 to 1.9), BMI 1984 (1.1, 1.02 to 1.1/kg/m2) and weight gain (1.1, 1.03 to 1.2/kg/m2). Among men aged 50 to 69 years, after adjustments for previous snoring status and age, weight gain was the only significant risk factor for developing habitual snoring (1.2, 1.05 to 1.4/kg/m2). CONCLUSIONS: In men, the prevalence of snoring increases up to the age of 50 to 60 years and is then followed by a decrease. Weight gain is a risk factor for snoring in all age groups, while smoking is mainly associated with snoring in men
PubMed ID
9792576 View in PubMed
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[10-year trends in body weight in men and women in Novosibirsk (1985-1995)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174900
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(3):64-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
E S Kylbanova
S K Maliutina
N V Nasonova
Iu P Nikitin
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(3):64-7
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Siberia
Weight Gain
Abstract
To assess 10-year trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity in Novosibirsk population.
The data of three population surveys (a total of 9714 men and women aged 25-64 years) carried out according to WHO MONICA program.
Obesity prevalence among males in 1985-1989 tended to a small rise without changes during subsequent 5 years. In females the prevalence of obesity and overweight decreased in 1985-1994.
10-year trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity were insignificant in men and beneficial in women of Novosibirsk population while the frequency of increased body mass in women remains relatively high.
PubMed ID
15881103 View in PubMed
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Ability and accuracy of long-term weight recall by elderly males: the Manitoba follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161375
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2008 Jan;18(1):36-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Dennis J Bayomi
Robert B Tate
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Follow-up Study, Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. Dennis_Bayomi@umanitoba.ca
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2008 Jan;18(1):36-42
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Body Weight
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba
Memory - physiology
Mental Recall - physiology
Questionnaires
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Abstract
To assess the ability and accuracy of elderly men to recall their weights and determine what characteristics might predict recall ability and accuracy.
Eight hundred sixty-nine elderly men (mean age, 84 years), participants of the Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS), responded to a questionnaire asking them to recall their weights at ages 20, 30, 50, and 65 years. Recalled weights were compared with measured weights collected since MFUS began in 1948. Logistic regression was used to predict ability and accuracy of weight recall.
Only 75% of respondents attempted to recall their weights at all 4 ages. Among men recalling 4 weights, fewer than half were accurate within +/- 10%, just 7% were within +/- 5% of their measured weights. Accuracy of recall was significantly and independently associated with body mass index during middle age (5 kg/m(2)) (odds ratio 0.83, 95% confidence interval: 0.76, 0.90) and weight change. Unmarried men were less likely than married men to attempt recalling all 4 weights. Men overweight at middle age were more likely to underestimate their recalled weights.
Studies relating weight in early adulthood or middle age with outcomes in later life should not rely on elderly male participants recalling those weights.
PubMed ID
17855121 View in PubMed
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Absence of nutritional or clinical consequences of decentralized bulk food portioning in elderly nursing home residents with dementia in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196462
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2000 Nov;100(11):1354-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
B. Shatenstein
G. Ferland
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche, Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2000 Nov;100(11):1354-60
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Canada
Dementia - metabolism
Eating - physiology - psychology
Energy intake
Female
Food Services
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes
Nutritional Status
Pilot Projects
Weight Gain
Abstract
To evaluate the nutritional and clinical consequences of changing from a centralized food delivery system to decentralized bulk food portioning; a system in which meal portioning occurs on residents' floors of a nursing home.
A pilot study with a pre-post design
The study took place on one floor of a home for elderly persons with dementia. Of the 34 residents, 22 (1 man) participated in this study. Average age was 82 years (range = 55 to 94 years). Nutritional status was verified before introduction of the bulk food portioning system by 3 nonconsecutive days of observed food intakes, anthropometric measurements (height, weight, triceps skinfold thickness, mid-upper-arm circumference), and biochemical parameters (albumin, lymphocytes, glucose, sodium, potassium, transferrin, vitamin B-12, folate, hemoglobin). Trained dietitians collected the dietary and anthropometric data and validated the food intake estimates and anthropometric measurements. Data were also collected 10 weeks after implementation of the new food distribution system.
Paired t tests adjusted by a Bonferroni correction assessed differences between values measured before and after introduction of the new food distribution system.
Average food consumption increased substantially and significantly after introduction of the bulk food portioning system. Mean energy intakes rose from 1,555 to 1,924 kcal/day and most other nutrients also increased, many significantly, but there were no changes in anthropometric values or biochemical parameters, except for albumin level which decreased to the lower normal limit.
Portioning of food in the residents' dining room simulates a homelike atmosphere thereby encouraging increased food consumption. With well-trained and enthusiastic staff, this system could contribute to improved nutritional status in the very elderly, even those who have dementia. Dietitians have a key role to play in overseeing residents' nutritional needs and in training, supervising, and motivating foodservice personnel.
PubMed ID
11103658 View in PubMed
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Acclimation of a non-indigenous sub-Arctic population: seasonal variation in thyroid function in interior Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214965
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol A Physiol. 1995 Jun;111(2):209-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
M. Levine
L. Duffy
D C Moore
L A Matej
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA.
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol A Physiol. 1995 Jun;111(2):209-14
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - ethnology
Arctic regions - ethnology
Body Weight
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Pineal Gland - physiology
Seasons
Thyroid Gland - physiology
Thyroxine - blood
Triiodothyronine - blood
Weight Gain
Abstract
Total, as well as free, T4 and T3 levels were obtained over four seasons for young male infantry soldiers assigned to interior Alaska. Significant seasonal variations were found in both T3 and T4. Total T4 and T3 levels were highest in winter, while free T4 and T3 levels were highest in early spring. Correlations with melatonin levels from a concurrent study showed an association between late day (17.00) mean spot melatonin levels during the preceding summer and T3 levels in winter and spring. Differences in seasonal T4 and T3 levels between indigenous and newly arrived people in the sub-Arctic may be related not only to cold acclimation but also to light.
PubMed ID
7788348 View in PubMed
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Adherence of pregnant women to Nordic dietary guidelines in relation to postpartum weight retention: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256846
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anne von Ruesten
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Kirsten Mehlig
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Anne.Lise.Brantsaeter@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Weight
Diet Surveys
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Postpartum Period - psychology
Pregnancy
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Pregnancy is a major life event for women and often connected with changes in diet and lifestyle and natural gestational weight gain. However, excessive weight gain during pregnancy may lead to postpartum weight retention and add to the burden of increasing obesity prevalence. Therefore, it is of interest to examine whether adherence to nutrient recommendations or food-based guidelines is associated with postpartum weight retention 6 months after birth.
This analysis is based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Diet during the first 4-5 months of pregnancy was assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire and maternal weight before pregnancy as well as in the postpartum period was assessed by questionnaires. Two Healthy Eating Index (HEI) scores were applied to measure compliance with either the official Norwegian food-based guidelines (HEI-NFG) or the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (HEI-NNR) during pregnancy. The considered outcome, i.e. weight retention 6 months after birth, was modelled in two ways: continuously (in kg) and categorically (risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, i.e. =?5% gain to pre-pregnancy weight). Associations between the HEI-NFG and HEI-NNR score with postpartum weight retention on the continuous scale were estimated by linear regression models. Relationships of both HEI scores with the categorical outcome variable were evaluated using logistic regression.
In the continuous model without adjustment for gestational weight gain (GWG), the HEI-NFG score but not the HEI-NNR score was inversely related to postpartum weight retention. However, after additional adjustment for GWG as potential intermediate the HEI-NFG score was marginally inversely and the HEI-NNR score was inversely associated with postpartum weight retention. In the categorical model, both HEI scores were inversely related with risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, independent of adjustment for GWG.
Higher adherence to either the official Norwegian food guidelines or possibly also to Nordic Nutrition Recommendations during pregnancy appears to be associated with lower postpartum weight retention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24456804 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the New Nordic Diet during pregnancy and subsequent maternal weight development: a study conducted in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299175
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 06; 119(11):1286-1294
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elisabet R Hillesund
Andrew K Wills
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Elling Bere
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
1Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition,University of Agder,PO Box 422,4604 Kristiansand,Norway.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 06; 119(11):1286-1294
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child
Diet
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Male
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight
Pregnancy
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
The rising prevalence of overweight and obesity is a worldwide public health challenge. Pregnancy and beyond is a potentially important window for future weight gain in women. We investigated associations between maternal adherence to the New Nordic diet (NND) during pregnancy and maternal BMI trajectories from delivery to 8 years post delivery. Data are from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. Pregnant women from all of Norway were recruited between 1999 and 2008, and 55 056 are included in the present analysis. A previously constructed diet score, NND, was used to assess adherence to the diet. The score favours intake of Nordic fruits, root vegetables, cabbages, potatoes, oatmeal porridge, whole grains, wild fish, game, berries, milk and water. Linear spline multi-level models were used to estimate the association. We found that women with higher adherence to the NND pattern during pregnancy had on average lower post-partum BMI trajectories and slightly less weight gain up to 8 years post delivery compared with the lower NND adherers. These associations remained after adjustment for physical activity, education, maternal age, smoking and parity (mean diff at delivery (high v. low adherers): -0·3 kg/m2; 95 % CI -0·4, -0·2; mean diff at 8 years: -0·5 kg/m2; 95 % CI -0·6, -0·4), and were not explained by differences in energy intake or by exclusive breast-feeding duration. Similar patterns of associations were seen with trajectories of overweight/obesity as the outcome. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the NND may have beneficial properties to long-term weight regulation among women post-partum.
PubMed ID
29770760 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue trans-fatty acids and changes in body weight and waist circumference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105926
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Apr 14;111(7):1283-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-2014
Author
Camilla P Hansen
Tina L Berentzen
Jane N Østergaard
Christina C Dahm
Lars I Hellgren
Erik B Schmidt
Anne Tjønneland
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Kim Overvad
Marianne U Jakobsen
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Apr 14;111(7):1283-91
Date
Apr-14-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue, White - metabolism
Biological Markers - metabolism
Biopsy, Needle
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dietary Fats - adverse effects - metabolism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Linoleic Acids, Conjugated - adverse effects - metabolism
Lost to Follow-Up
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - etiology - metabolism - pathology
Oleic Acids - adverse effects - metabolism
Questionnaires
Registries
Trans Fatty Acids - adverse effects - metabolism
Waist Circumference
Weight Gain
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that the intake of trans-fatty acids (TFA) plays a role in the development of obesity. The proportions of adipose tissue fatty acids not synthesised endogenously in humans, such as TFA, usually correlate well with the dietary intake. Hence, the use of these biomarkers may provide a more accurate measure of habitual TFA intake than that obtained with dietary questionnaires. The objective of the present study was to investigate the associations between the proportions of specific TFA in adipose tissue and subsequent changes in weight and waist circumference (WC). The relative content of fatty acids in adipose tissue biopsies from a random sample of 996 men and women aged 50-64 years drawn from a Danish cohort study was determined by GC. Baseline data on weight, WC and potential confounders were available together with information on weight and WC 5 years after enrolment. The exposure measures were total trans-octadecenoic acids (18:1t), 18:1 ?6-10t, vaccenic acid (18:1 ?11t) and rumenic acid (18:2 ?9c, 11t). Data were analysed using multiple regression with cubic spline modelling. The median proportion of total adipose tissue 18:1t was 1.52% (90% central range 0.98, 2.19) in men and 1.47% (1.01, 2.19) in women. No significant associations were observed between the proportions of total 18:1t, 18:1 ?6-10t, vaccenic acid or rumenic acid and changes in weight or WC. The present study suggests that the proportions of specific TFA in adipose tissue are not associated with subsequent changes in weight or WC within the exposure range observed in this population.
PubMed ID
24286469 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent metabolic effects of second-generation antipsychotics in second-generation antipsychotic-naïve French Canadian patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138355
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2010 Dec;20(6):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Geneviève Roy
Alain Bedard
Paul-André Desmarais
France Jourdain
Sylvie Allen
Danielle Michaud
Leila Ben Amor
Author Affiliation
CHAU Hotel Dieu de Levis, Department of Psychiatry, Laval University, Levis, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2010 Dec;20(6):479-87
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Body mass index
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Lipids - blood
Male
Metabolic Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Weight Gain - drug effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients receiving second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) may experience secondary metabolic effects such as weight gain, as well as changes in lipid and glucose metabolism. These effects are well documented in adults; however, fewer studies are available concerning their occurrence and their evolution in children and adolescents.
The aim of this study was to determine if there is an age-dependent variation in the metabolic effects of SGAs in a drug-naïve population.
Charts of 232 French Canadian patients participating in a program monitoring the metabolic effects of SGAs were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 85 SGA-naïve patients were selected, including 58 youths and 27 adults. Changes, relative to baseline, in weight, body mass index, lipid metabolism (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride), and fasting blood glucose were assessed, with follow-up at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months.
With respect to weight gain, in both the youth and adult groups, body mass index significantly increased from baseline at 3 months (10.1% [p?
PubMed ID
21186966 View in PubMed
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[A high standard of living can contribute to the increase of childhood diabetes. Rapid growth and weight gain are risk factors]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31561
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Mar 7;99(10):1046-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-7-2002
Author
Gisela Dahlquist
Author Affiliation
Norrlands Universitetssjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Mar 7;99(10):1046-50
Date
Mar-7-2002
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
English Abstract
Genetic markers
Growth
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Gain
Abstract
According to records kept by The Swedish Child Diabetes Register the incidence of childhood diabetes type I before 15 years of age has increased. The increase is most noticeable in children before the age of 5. The genetic basis of this disease is complex and the different risk genes have a low penetrance, thus indicating non-genetic factors to have a great impact. One risk factor for type I diabetes is rapid growth, measured either as weight or as height gain. As a high standard of living favours rapid growth in children this may contribute to the onset of the disease.
PubMed ID
12024777 View in PubMed
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528 records – page 1 of 53.