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Adding point of care ultrasound to assess volume status in heart failure patients in a nurse-led outpatient clinic. A randomised study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271711
Source
Heart. 2016 Jan;102(1):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Guri Holmen Gundersen
Tone M Norekval
Hilde Haugberg Haug
Kyrre Skjetne
Jens Olaf Kleinau
Torbjorn Graven
Havard Dalen
Source
Heart. 2016 Jan;102(1):29-34
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Cardiology Service, Hospital
Diuretics - administration & dosage
Drug Dosage Calculations
Female
Heart Failure - blood - drug therapy - nursing - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Norway
Nursing Service, Hospital
Observer Variation
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Peptide Fragments - blood
Pleural Cavity - ultrasonography
Point-of-Care Systems
Point-of-Care Testing
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Vena Cava, Inferior - ultrasonography
Water-Electrolyte Balance - drug effects
Abstract
Medical history, physical examination and laboratory testing are not optimal for the assessment of volume status in heart failure (HF) patients. We aimed to study the clinical influence of focused ultrasound of the pleural cavities and inferior vena cava (IVC) performed by specialised nurses to assess volume status in HF patients at an outpatient clinic.
HF outpatients were prospectively included and underwent laboratory testing, history recording and clinical examination by two nurses with and without an ultrasound examination of the pleural cavities and IVC using a pocket-size imaging device, in random order. Each nurse worked in a team with a cardiologist. The influence of the different diagnostic tests on diuretic dosing was assessed descriptively and in linear regression analyses.
Sixty-two patients were included and 119 examinations were performed. Mean±SD age was 74±12 years, EF was 34±14%, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) value was 3761±3072 ng/L. Dosing of diuretics differed between the teams in 31 out of 119 consultations. Weight change and volume status assessed clinically with and without ultrasound predicted dose adjustment of diuretics at follow-up (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
26438785 View in PubMed
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Copeptin, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 and sitagliptin: A report from the BEta-cell function in Glucose abnormalities and Acute Myocardial Infarction study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286354
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2016 Jul;13(4):307-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Lisa Arnetz
Camilla Hage
Kerstin Brismar
Sergiu-Bogdan Catrina
Anna Norhammar
Pia Lundman
Märit Wallander
Lars Ryden
Linda Mellbin
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2016 Jul;13(4):307-11
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Double-Blind Method
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Glycopeptides - blood
Hospitalization
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 - blood
Insulin-Secreting Cells - drug effects - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Neurophysins - metabolism
Osmolar Concentration
Protein Precursors - metabolism
Sitagliptin Phosphate - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Vasopressins - metabolism
Water-Electrolyte Balance - drug effects
Abstract
To investigate whether sitagliptin affects copeptin and osmolality, suggesting arginine vasopressin activation and a potential for fluid retention, compared with placebo, in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome and newly discovered type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. A second aim was to confirm whether copeptin correlated with insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1.
Fasting blood samples were used from the BEta-cell function in Glucose abnormalities and Acute Myocardial Infarction trial, in which patients recently hospitalized due to acute coronary syndrome and with newly detected abnormal glucose tolerance were randomized to sitagliptin 100?mg once daily (n?=?34) or placebo (n?=?37). Copeptin, osmolality and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 were analysed at baseline and after 12?weeks.
Copeptin and osmolality were unaffected by sitagliptin. There was no correlation between copeptin and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1.
Sitagliptin therapy does not appear to be related to activation of the arginine vasopressin system.
PubMed ID
27190088 View in PubMed
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Drinking and arterial blood pressure responses to ANG II in young and old rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100465
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2010 Nov;299(5):R1135-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Robert L Thunhorst
Terry G Beltz
Alan Kim Johnson
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Iowa, 11 Seashore Hall E., Iowa City, IA 52242-1407, USA. robert-thunhorst@uiowa.edu
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2010 Nov;299(5):R1135-41
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Age Factors
Aging
Angiotensin I - administration & dosage
Angiotensin II - administration & dosage
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Animals
Baroreflex - drug effects
Behavior, Animal - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Captopril - administration & dosage
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drinking - drug effects
Drinking Behavior - drug effects
Heart Rate - drug effects
Infusions, Intravenous
Male
Minoxidil - administration & dosage
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Urodynamics - drug effects
Vasodilator Agents - administration & dosage
Water-Electrolyte Balance - drug effects
Abstract
We investigated water drinking and arterial blood pressure responses to intravenous infusions of ANG II in young (4 mo), middle-aged adult (12 mo), and old (29 mo) male Brown Norway rats. Infusions of ANG II began with arterial blood pressure either at control levels or at reduced levels following injection of the vasodilator minoxidil. Under control conditions, mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to ANG II rose to the same level for all groups, and middle-aged and old rats drank as much or more water in response to ANG II compared with young rats, depending on whether intakes were analyzed using absolute or body weight-adjusted values. When arterial blood pressure first was reduced with minoxidil, MAP in response to ANG II stabilized at significantly lower levels compared with control conditions for all groups. Young rats drank significantly more water under reduced pressure conditions compared with control conditions, while middle-aged and old rats did not. Urine volume in response to ANG II was lower, while water balance was higher, under conditions of reduced pressure compared with control conditions. Baroreflex control of heart rate was substantially reduced in old rats compared with young and middle-aged animals. In summary, young rats appear to be more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of increased arterial blood pressure on water drinking than are older animals.
Notes
RefSource: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2010 Nov;299(5):R1133-4
PubMed ID
20739604 View in PubMed
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[Effect of ascorbic acid and glascorbin on extracellular and intracellular distribution of some electrolytes and water in skeletal muscles during experimental scurvy]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62659
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1968;40(1):99-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968

[Effect of desalinated water of low mineral content on human water-electrolyte metabolism]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62530
Source
Gig Sanit. 1975 Mar;(3):18-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1975

[Effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors on water-salt homeostasis in hypertensive patients living in Far North].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198729
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2000;78(3):42-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
A M Vershinina
L I Gapon
I F Bazhukhina
D V Teffenberg
V V Drozdov
N A Spitsina
O I Sergeichik
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2000;78(3):42-6
Date
2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - urine
Captopril - therapeutic use
Cold Climate
Environmental Exposure
Homeostasis - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - metabolism
Male
Prognosis
Ramipril - therapeutic use
Siberia
Sodium - urine
Water-Electrolyte Balance - drug effects
Abstract
The aim of the study was evaluation of ACE inhibitors (captopril and ramipril) effect on water-salt homeostasis in the treatment of patients with arterial hypertension (AH) living in the Far North of Russia. 100 male patients with mild and moderate AH were examined 2 weeks, 3 and 6 months after administration of captopril or ramipril. The drugs are shown to correct water-salt metabolism. This is explained by better renal function due to speeding up glomerular filtration and increased sodium excretion with urine, and by activity of humoral mechanisms (inhibited activity of plasma renin, low plasma concentration of aldosterone and its 24-h excretion). Comparison of captopril versus ramipril demonstrates advantages of prolonged ramipril in respect to regulation of water salt metabolism in the treatment of essential hypertension in the Far North.
PubMed ID
10790965 View in PubMed
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Ethanol decreases nocturnal plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP 99-126) but not the N-terminal fragment of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP 1-98) in man.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11594
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 1994 Mar;86(3):285-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
A C Ekman
O. Vakkuri
O. Vuolteenaho
J. Leppäluoto
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 1994 Mar;86(3):285-90
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Comparative Study
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Ethanol - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Male
Osmolar Concentration
Peptide Fragments - blood
Protein Precursors - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sodium - blood
Time Factors
Urination - drug effects
Water-Electrolyte Balance - drug effects
Abstract
1. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of atrial natriuretic peptides in the regulation of water and electrolyte balance after alcohol intake. To this end we measured the plasma concentrations of ethanol, atrial natriuretic peptide 99-126 and the N-terminal fragment of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (atrial natriuretic peptide 1-98), serum osmolality and serum sodium concentration, and urine output, urine osmolality and urinary sodium excretion for 12 h after administration of ethanol (0, 0.5 and 1.0 g body weight/kg) and placebo drinks to nine healthy subjects according to a double-blind cross-over design. 2. Intake of ethanol (at 19.00-19.45 hours) inhibited the nocturnal increase in the plasma atrial natriuretic peptide 99-126 level dose-dependently (P
PubMed ID
8156739 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exercise-associated hyponatremia in Alaskan sled dogs: urinary and hormonal responses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4869
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1997 Sep;83(3):824-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
K W Hinchcliff
G A Reinhart
J R Burr
R A Swenson
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus 43210, USA.
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1997 Sep;83(3):824-9
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body Weight - physiology
Diet
Diuresis - drug effects
Dogs
Eating - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exertion - physiology
Female
Hormones - blood
Hyponatremia - blood - physiopathology - urine
Male
Osmolar Concentration
Sodium - urine
Urea - urine
Water-Electrolyte Balance - drug effects
Abstract
Exercise-associated hyponatremia occurs in horses and humans, both species that sweat, and in sled dogs, which do not sweat. To investigate the mechanism of exercise-associated hyponatremia in sled dogs, we measured water turnover, serum electrolyte concentrations and osmolality, plasma renal hormone concentrations, and urine composition of 12 fit Alaskan sled dogs before, during, and after a 490-km sled dog race (Ex group). Water turnover and serum electrolyte concentrations were measured in six similarly fit dogs that did not run (Sed group). Water turnover was significantly larger (P
PubMed ID
9292469 View in PubMed
Less detail

Metabolic side-effects of estrogen therapy for prostatic cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25005
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol Suppl. 1991;138:127-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
M. Kontturi
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol Suppl. 1991;138:127-30
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Coagulation - drug effects
Estrogens - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Glucose - metabolism
Humans
Lipid Metabolism
Liver - drug effects
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - drug therapy
Water-Electrolyte Balance - drug effects
PubMed ID
1784996 View in PubMed
Less detail

Monitoring of Daily Body Weight and Intrathoracic Impedance in Heart Failure Patients With a High Risk of Volume Overload Decompensation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281200
Source
Clin Cardiol. 2016 Aug;39(8):446-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Kristjan Gudmundsson
Patrik Lyngå
Mårten Rosenqvist
Frieder Braunschweig
Source
Clin Cardiol. 2016 Aug;39(8):446-52
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices
Cardiography, Impedance - instrumentation
Defibrillators, Implantable
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Electric Countershock - instrumentation
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Hemodynamics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Stroke Volume
Sweden
Telemetry - instrumentation
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Function, Left
Water-Electrolyte Balance - drug effects
Weight Gain - drug effects
Abstract
Decompensation is frequent in heart failure (HF) patients and predicts poor prognosis.
Volume-overload events in HF patients are preceded by changes in intrathoracic impedance (Z) and body weight (BW); monitoring these parameters may be useful to predict decompensation.
Forty-three HF patients (LVEF 25%?±?12%) with a recent HF event and an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator providing daily Z were equipped with telemonitoring scales submitting daily BW. Changes in BW and Z 30 days prior to major (HF hospitalization) and minor (ambulatory adjustment of diuretics) were analyzed.
During median of 427 days follow-up 25 major and 41 minor events occurred. Z decreased by -4.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: CI -6.7 to -3.0) and -4.3 (95% CI: -5.5 to -3.2) within 30 days prior to major and minor events respectively (P?
PubMed ID
27175605 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.