Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Holistic assessment of a secondary water supply for a new development in Copenhagen, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264053
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Nov 1;497-498:430-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2014
Author
M. Rygaard
B. Godskesen
C. Jørgensen
B. Hoffmann
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Nov 1;497-498:430-9
Date
Nov-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Denmark
Housing
Humans
Water Resources - standards - statistics & numerical data
Water Supply - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Increasing stress on water resources is driving urban water utilities to establish new concepts for water supply. This paper presents the consequences of proposed alternative water supply options using a unique combination of quantitative and qualitative methods from different research fields. A former industrial harbor area in Copenhagen, Denmark, is currently under development and all infrastructure will be updated to accommodate 40,000 inhabitants and 40,000 jobs in the future. To reduce stress on water resources it has been proposed to establish a secondary water supply in the area as an alternative to the conventional groundwater-based drinking water supply. Four alternative concepts for a secondary water supply have been considered: 1) slightly polluted groundwater for use in toilets and laundry, 2) desalinated brackish water for use in toilets, laundry, and dishwashers, 3) desalinated brackish water for all uses, including drinking water, and 4) local reclamation of rain and gray water for use in toilets and laundry. The concepts have been evaluated for their technical feasibility, economy, health risks, and public acceptance, while the concepts' environmental sustainability has been assessed using lifecycle assessment and freshwater use impact methods. The holistic assessment method exposes conflicting preference solutions depending on assessment criteria, and reveals multi-faceted consequences for choices in urban water management. Not one concept turns out unambiguously positive based on the evaluation criteria included here, but the systematic evaluation will leave decision-makers informed on the consequences of their choices.
PubMed ID
25150737 View in PubMed
Less detail

Investigating public perceptions and knowledge translation priorities to improve water safety for residents with private water supplies: a cross-sectional study in Newfoundland and Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105511
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:1225
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Steven M Roche
Andria Jones-Bitton
Shannon E Majowicz
Katarina D M Pintar
David Allison
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2 W1, Canada. sroche@uoguelph.ca.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:1225
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Newfoundland and Labrador
Private Sector
Water Microbiology
Water Supply - standards - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The first objective of this study was to investigate the public perceptions of private water and alternative sources with respect to safety, quality, testing and treatment in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), Canada. The second objective was to provide public health practitioners with recommendations for improving knowledge translation (KT) efforts in NL, based on assessments of respondents' perceived information needs and preferred KT methods.
A cross-sectional telephone survey of 618 households with private water supplies was conducted in March-April, 2007. Questions pertained to respondents' perceptions of their tap water, water concerns, alternative water use, well characteristics, and water testing behaviours.
Approximately 94% of households were supplied by private wells (50% drilled and 50% dug wells), while 6% obtained water from roadside ponds, rivers or springs (RPRS). While 85% rated their water quality highly, 55% nevertheless had concerns about its overall safety. Approximately 11% of respondents never tested their water, and of the 89% that had, 80% tested at frequencies below provincial recommendations for bacterial testing. More than one-third of respondents reported treating their water in the home, and 78% employed active carbon filtration methods. Respondents wanted more information on testing options and advice on effective treatment methods. Targeted advertising through television, flyers/brochures and/or radio is recommended as a first step to increase awareness. More active KT methods involving key stakeholders may be most effective in improving testing and treatment behaviour.
The results presented here can assist public health practitioners in tailoring current KT initiatives to influence well owner stewardship behaviour.
Notes
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2004 Oct 22-Nov 26;67(20-22):1679-70415371209
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2004 Oct 22-Nov 26;67(20-22):1619-4215371205
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Jul-Aug;96(4):254-816625790
Cites: J Water Health. 2008 Dec;6(4):521-518401117
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2007 Dec 15;388(1-3):54-6517915294
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006;6:9416608511
Cites: J Water Health. 2009 Jun;7(2):276-9219240354
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Jul 13;182(10):1061-420231341
Cites: J Water Health. 2010 Dec;8(4):671-8620705979
Cites: J Environ Manage. 2011 Apr;92(4):1104-1421185114
Cites: J Water Health. 2011 Jun;9(2):241-5221942190
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012;12:55622834485
Cites: Can Commun Dis Rep. 2001 Nov 15;27(22):185-9211729455
Cites: Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2003 Mar;70(3):447-5412592517
Cites: Water Sci Technol. 2003;47(3):7-1412638998
Cites: J Water Health. 2006 Mar;4(1):125-3816604844
PubMed ID
24365203 View in PubMed
Less detail

Uneven access to safe drinking water for First Nations in Canada: connecting health and place through source water protection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139331
Source
Health Place. 2011 Jan;17(1):386-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Robert J Patrick
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan Saskatoon, SK, Canada. robert.patrick@usask.ca
Source
Health Place. 2011 Jan;17(1):386-9
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Water Pollution - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Water Quality - standards
Water Supply - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Source water protection has gained considerable attention in the water resources literature particularly after several well publicized (non-First Nations) water contamination events in Canada. This short report explores health and place through an examination of access to safe drinking water in a developed country. For First Nations in Canada, safe drinking water remains a serious, albeit under-reported, problem. The incidence of contaminated drinking water is pervasive in many First Nations communities. Attempts to "fix" water quality problems using technology alone have produced only limited success. It will be shown that greater attention to source water protection has potential for both to improve drinking water quality as well as to re-connect health and place for First Nations in Canada.
PubMed ID
21074479 View in PubMed
Less detail