Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

[100 years of drinking water regulation. Retrospective review, current situation and prospects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104086
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Mar-Apr;(2):5-18
Publication Type
Article
Author
Yu A Rakhmanin
G N Krasovsky
N A Egorova
R I Mikhailova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Mar-Apr;(2):5-18
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drinking Water - standards
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Water Quality - standards
Water Supply - history - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Abstract
There is considered the history of the development of legislative requirements to the regulation of the quality of drinking water in different countries and international organizations during the period from 1912 to the present time. In terms of comparative analysis there is analyzed the current state of regulatory frameworks of the Russian Federation, WHO, EU, Finland, the UK, Singapore, Australia, Japan, China, Nigeria, the United States and Canada in the field of providing favorable conditions of population drinking water use. There has been noted the significant progress in standardization of the content of the biogenic elements and chemical pollution of drinking water in the absence of uniform requirements to the composition and properties of drinking water globally, that is bound to the need to take into account the national peculiarities of drinking water supply within the separate countries. As promising directions for improving regulation of drinking water quality there are noted: the development of new standards for prioritized water pollution, periodic review ofstandards after appearance of the new scientific data on the biological action of substances, the use of the concept of risk, the harmonization of the normative values and the assessment of the possibility of introduction into the practice the one more criterion of profitableness of population water use--the bioenergetic state of the water.
PubMed ID
25051731 View in PubMed
Less detail

"Back to the Future": Time for a Renaissance of Public Health Engineering.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300910
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 01 29; 16(3):
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Review
Date
01-29-2019
Author
Richard J Gelting
Steven C Chapra
Paul E Nevin
David E Harvey
David M Gute
Author Affiliation
Division of Global Health Protection, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. rug7@cdc.gov.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 01 29; 16(3):
Date
01-29-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Engineering - history - statistics & numerical data
History, 20th Century
Humans
Indians, North American
Public Health - history - statistics & numerical data
Sanitary Engineering - history - methods
Sanitation - history
United States
Water Supply - history
Abstract
Public health has always been, and remains, an interdisciplinary field, and engineering was closely aligned with public health for many years. Indeed, the branch of engineering that has been known at various times as sanitary engineering, public health engineering, or environmental engineering was integral to the emergence of public health as a distinct discipline. However, in the United States (U.S.) during the 20th century, the academic preparation and practice of this branch of engineering became largely separated from public health. Various factors contributed to this separation, including an evolution in leadership roles within public health; increasing specialization within public health; and the emerging environmental movement, which led to the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with its emphasis on the natural environment. In this paper, we consider these factors in turn. We also present a case study example of public health engineering in current practice in the U.S. that has had large-scale positive health impacts through improving water and sanitation services in Native American and Alaska Native communities. We also consider briefly how to educate engineers to work in public health in the modern world, and the benefits and challenges associated with that process. We close by discussing the global implications of public health engineering and the need to re-integrate engineering into public health practice and strengthen the connection between the two fields.
PubMed ID
30700061 View in PubMed
Less detail

Equitable child health interventions: The impact of improved water and sanitation on inequalities in child mortality in Stockholm, 1878 to 1925

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29940
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Feb;95(2):208-216
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
  1 website  
Author
Burström, B
Macassa, G
Oberg, L
Bernhardt E
Smedman, L
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. bo.burstrom@phs.ki.se
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Feb;95(2):208-216
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Mortality - trends
Child Welfare - history
Child, Preschool
Diarrhea - history - mortality
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Poverty
Public Health - history
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sanitation - history - standards
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Water Supply - history - standards
Abstract
Today, many of the 10 million childhood deaths each year are caused by diseases of poverty--diarrhea and pneumonia, for example, which were previously major causes of childhood death in many European countries. Specific analyses of the historical decline of child mortality may shed light on the potential equity impact of interventions to reduce child mortality. In our study of the impact of improved water and sanitation in Stockholm from 1878 to 1925, we examined the decline in overall and diarrhea mortality among children, both in general and by socioeconomic group. We report a decline in overall mortality and of diarrhea mortality and a leveling out of socioeconomic differences in child mortality due to diarrheal diseases, but not of overall mortality. The contribution of general and targeted policies is discussed.
Notes
Comment In: American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Feb;95(2):19515762014
PubMed ID
15671452 View in PubMed
Online Resources
Less detail

[First municipal sanitary stations in Russia: history and main activities (to the 125th anniversary since foundation)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290337
Source
Gig Sanit. 2017; 96(2):187-9
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Author
E V Sherstneva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2017; 96(2):187-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Anniversaries and Special Events
Food Inspection - history
History, 19th Century
Humans
Public Health - history
Public Health Administration - history
Russia
Urban Health - history
Water Supply - history
Abstract
First municipal sanitary stations in Russia were founded in 1891 in the cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg. They were financed by municipal public self-governments. With performing essential laboratory tests and studies, stations were an important element of the organization of sanitary inspection in cities. In the article there is considered the history of the creation offirst sanitary stations and main directions of their activity: control in the sphere offood trade and in the sphere of municipal water supply.
PubMed ID
29446608 View in PubMed
Less detail

The impact of water supply and sanitation on area differentials in the decline of diarrhoeal disease mortality among infants in Stockholm 1878-1925.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80560
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(5):526-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Macassa Gloria
De Leon Antonio Ponce
Burström Bo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE 17176 Stockholm, Sweden. Gloria.Macassa@phs.ki.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(5):526-33
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diarrhea, Infantile - history - mortality
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Risk factors
Sanitation - history
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Water Supply - history
Abstract
This study analyses the impact of improved water supply and sanitation on the level and rate of decline of child diarrhoea mortality in Stockholm 1878-1925. Previous studies have failed to demonstrate an effect of improved water supply on the risk of diarrhoea mortality at the individual level. Using data on access to water and sanitation from a household survey in 1895 and mortality rates and sociodemographic information from individual data 1878-1925 to analyse area differentials in diarrhoea mortality, it was found that the proportion having their own latrine in the household was associated with lower mortality risk in 1895-1900, while the proportion having water in the household was associated with lower diarrhoea mortality risk during the mortality decline until 1925. Population effects of improved water and sanitation on diarrhoea mortality may be better measured at area level than at individual level.
PubMed ID
16990164 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The activities of the sanitary organizations of cities of Russia in the area of water-supply and sewerage system (late XIX -- early XX centuries)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160918
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2007 Jul-Aug;(4):50-4
Publication Type
Article

[The status and measures to secure safe household water supply in the Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141290
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 May-Jun;(3):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
G G Onishchenko
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 May-Jun;(3):4-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Drinking
Forecasting
History, 21st Century
Humans
Preventive Medicine
Public Health
Russia
Sanitation
Water Pollution - prevention & control
Water Pollution, Chemical - prevention & control
Water Supply - history - standards
Abstract
To preserve the health of our nation, to reduce mortality rates, and to increase longevity are the most important conditions for solving the problem of national security. The Russian Federation completely supports the world community's efforts to conserve water bodies and to prevent the spread water-borne diseases. Despite the fact that Russia is the largest water country and has one fifth of the worldwide resources, the situation in this sphere is serious as before. Portable water deficiency in a number of the Russian Federation's subjects, such as the Kostroma, Kaluga, and Pskov Republics, the Republic of North-Alania, etc., is one of the poor factors of household water supply. To improve the provision of our country's population with good-quality drinking water, the Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare, continuously does work to improve the legal and regulatory basis that stipulates sanitary-and-epidemiological standards for portable water and drinking water supply.
PubMed ID
20737686 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.