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95 records – page 1 of 10.

[100 years of drinking water regulation. Retrospective review, current situation and prospects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104086
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Mar-Apr;(2):5-18
Publication Type
Article
Author
Yu A Rakhmanin
G N Krasovsky
N A Egorova
R I Mikhailova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Mar-Apr;(2):5-18
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drinking Water - standards
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Water Quality - standards
Water Supply - history - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Abstract
There is considered the history of the development of legislative requirements to the regulation of the quality of drinking water in different countries and international organizations during the period from 1912 to the present time. In terms of comparative analysis there is analyzed the current state of regulatory frameworks of the Russian Federation, WHO, EU, Finland, the UK, Singapore, Australia, Japan, China, Nigeria, the United States and Canada in the field of providing favorable conditions of population drinking water use. There has been noted the significant progress in standardization of the content of the biogenic elements and chemical pollution of drinking water in the absence of uniform requirements to the composition and properties of drinking water globally, that is bound to the need to take into account the national peculiarities of drinking water supply within the separate countries. As promising directions for improving regulation of drinking water quality there are noted: the development of new standards for prioritized water pollution, periodic review ofstandards after appearance of the new scientific data on the biological action of substances, the use of the concept of risk, the harmonization of the normative values and the assessment of the possibility of introduction into the practice the one more criterion of profitableness of population water use--the bioenergetic state of the water.
PubMed ID
25051731 View in PubMed
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Accumulated state of the Yukon River watershed: part I critical review of literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121234
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Monique G Dubé
Breda Muldoon
Julie Wilson
Karonhiakta'tie Bryan Maracle
Author Affiliation
Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick, Alberta, Canada. Dub.mon@hotmail.com
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animal Migration
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Climate change
Environment
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Fishes - physiology
Fresh Water - analysis - microbiology - parasitology
Humans
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Seasons
Water Movements
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Water Quality
Yukon Territory - epidemiology
Abstract
A consistent methodology for assessing the accumulating effects of natural and manmade change on riverine systems has not been developed for a whole host of reasons including a lack of data, disagreement over core elements to consider, and complexity. Accumulated state assessments of aquatic systems is an integral component of watershed cumulative effects assessment. The Yukon River is the largest free flowing river in the world and is the fourth largest drainage basin in North America, draining 855,000 km(2) in Canada and the United States. Because of its remote location, it is considered pristine but little is known about its cumulative state. This review identified 7 "hot spot" areas in the Yukon River Basin including Lake Laberge, Yukon River at Dawson City, the Charley and Yukon River confluence, Porcupine and Yukon River confluence, Yukon River at the Dalton Highway Bridge, Tolovana River near Tolovana, and Tanana River at Fairbanks. Climate change, natural stressors, and anthropogenic stresses have resulted in accumulating changes including measurable levels of contaminants in surface waters and fish tissues, fish and human disease, changes in surface hydrology, as well as shifts in biogeochemical loads. This article is the first integrated accumulated state assessment for the Yukon River basin based on a literature review. It is the first part of a 2-part series. The second article (Dubé et al. 2013a, this issue) is a quantitative accumulated state assessment of the Yukon River Basin where hot spots and hot moments are assessed outside of a "normal" range of variability.
PubMed ID
22927161 View in PubMed
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An integrated numerical framework for water quality modelling in cold-region rivers: A case of the lower Athabasca River.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290773
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Nov 01; 569-570:634-646
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-01-2016
Author
Ahmad Shakibaeinia
Shalini Kashyap
Yonas B Dibike
Terry D Prowse
Author Affiliation
Water & Climate Impact Research Centre, Environment and Climate Change Canada, University of Victoria, Canada. Electronic address: shakiba@uvic.ca.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Nov 01; 569-570:634-646
Date
Nov-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alberta
Cold Temperature
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Models, Theoretical
Nitrogen - analysis
Oxygen - analysis
Phosphorus - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Quality
Abstract
There is a great deal of interest to determine the state and variations of water quality parameters in the lower Athabasca River (LAR) ecosystem, northern Alberta, Canada, due to industrial developments in the region. As a cold region river, the annual cycle of ice cover formation and breakup play a key role in water quality transformation and transportation processes. An integrated deterministic numerical modelling framework is developed and applied for long-term and detailed simulation of the state and variation (spatial and temporal) of major water quality constituents both in open-water and ice covered conditions in the lower Athabasca River (LAR). The framework is based on the a 1D and a 2D hydrodynamic and water quality models externally coupled with the 1D river ice process models to account for the cold season effects. The models are calibrated/validated using available measured data and applied for simulation of dissolved oxygen (DO) and nutrients (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus). The results show the effect of winter ice cover on reducing the DO concentration, and a fluctuating temporal trend for DO and nutrients during summer periods with substantial differences in concentration between the main channel and flood plains. This numerical frame work can be the basis for future water quality scenario-based studies in the LAR.
PubMed ID
27376919 View in PubMed
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Are horse paddocks threatening water quality through excess loading of nutrients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264846
Source
J Environ Manage. 2015 Jan 1;147:306-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2015
Author
Mohammed Masud Parvage
Barbro Ulén
Holger Kirchmann
Source
J Environ Manage. 2015 Jan 1;147:306-13
Date
Jan-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Animal Husbandry - methods
Animals
Horses
Housing, Animal - statistics & numerical data
Linear Models
Nitrogen - analysis
Phosphorus - analysis
Soil - chemistry
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Quality - standards
Abstract
The Baltic Sea is one of the most eutrophied water bodies in northern Europe and more than 50% of its total anthropogenic waterborne phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) loads derive from agricultural sources. Sweden is the second largest contributor of waterborne N and the third largest contributor of waterborne P to the Baltic Sea. Horse farms now occupy almost 10% of Swedish agricultural land, but are not well investigated with regard to their environmental impact. In this study, potential P, N and carbon (C) leaching losses were measured from two representative horse paddock topsoils (0-20 cm; a clay and a loamy sand) following simulated rainfall events in the laboratory. Results showed that the leachate concentrations and net release of P, N and dissolved organic C (DOC) from paddock topsoils were highest in feeding and excretion areas and considerably higher from the loamy sand than the clay paddock topsoil. Leaching losses of dissolved reactive P (DRP) were significantly (p
PubMed ID
25284798 View in PubMed
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Assimilation of satellite data to 3D hydrodynamic model of Lake Säkylän Pyhäjärvi.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267761
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;71(7):1033-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Akiko Mano
Olli Malve
Sampsa Koponen
Kari Kallio
Antti Taskinen
Janne Ropponen
Janne Juntunen
Ninni Liukko
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;71(7):1033-9
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Eutrophication
Finland
Hydrodynamics
Lakes - analysis
Models, Theoretical
Remote Sensing Technology
Spacecraft
Water Quality
Abstract
To analyze the applicability of direct insertion of total suspended matter (TSM) concentration field based on turbidity derived from satellite data to numerical simulation, dispersion studies of suspended matter in Lake Säkylän Pyhäjärvi (lake area 154 km²; mean depth 5.4 m) were conducted using the 3D COHERENS simulation model. To evaluate the practicality of direct insertion, five cases with different initialization frequencies were conducted: (1) every time, when satellite data were available; (2) every 10 days; (3) 20 days; (4) 30 days; and (5) control run without repeated initialization. To determine the effectiveness of initialization frequency, three methods of comparison were used: simple spatial differences of TSM concentration without biomass in the lake surface layer; averaged spatial differences between initialization data and the forecasts; and time series of TSM concentration and observation data at 1 m depth at the deepest point of the lake. Results showed that direct insertion improves the forecast significantly, even if it is applied less often.
PubMed ID
25860706 View in PubMed
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Association between perceptions of public drinking water quality and actual drinking water quality: A community-based exploratory study in Newfoundland (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286254
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Nov;159:435-443
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Benjamin Ochoo
James Valcour
Atanu Sarkar
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Nov;159:435-443
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Drinking Water - analysis - standards
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Perception
Public Opinion
Water Quality
Young Adult
Abstract
Studying public perception on drinking water quality is crucial for managing of water resources, generation of water quality standards, and surveillance of the drinking-water quality. However, in policy discourse, the reliability of public perception concerning drinking water quality and associated health risks is questionable. Does the public perception of water quality equate with the actual water quality? We investigated public perceptions of water quality and the perceived health risks and associated with the actual quality of public water supplies in the same communities. The study was conducted in 45 communities of Newfoundland (Canada) in 2012. First, a telephone survey of 100 households was conducted to examine public perceptions of drinking water quality of their respective public sources. Then we extracted public water quality reports of the same communities (1988-2011) from the provincial government's water resources portal. These reports contained the analysis of 2091 water samples, including levels of Disinfection By-Products (DBPs), nutrients, metals, ions and physical parameters. The reports showed that colour, manganese, total dissolved solids, iron, turbidity, and DBPs were the major detected parameters in the public water. However, the majority of the respondents (>56%) were either completely satisfied or very satisfied with the quality of drinking water. Older, higher educated and high-income group respondents were more satisfied with water quality than the younger, less educated and low-income group respondents. The study showed that there was no association with public satisfaction level and actual water quality of the respective communities. Even, in the communities, supplied by the same water system, the respondents had differences in opinion. Despite the effort by the provincial government to make the water-test results available on its website for years, the study showed existing disconnectedness between public perception of drinking water quality and actual quality. We had little scope to explore the possible explanations, and hence further studies are required to verify the age, gender educational status and income differential about the satisfaction of public service like water supply.
PubMed ID
28858757 View in PubMed
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Benefits of Water Safety Plans: microbiology, compliance, and public health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123644
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jul 17;46(14):7782-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-17-2012
Author
Maria J Gunnarsdottir
Sigurdur M Gardarsson
Mark Elliott
Gudrun Sigmundsdottir
Jamie Bartram
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Iceland, Hjardarhaga 2-6, 107 Reykjavik, Iceland. mariag@hi.is
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jul 17;46(14):7782-9
Date
Jul-17-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colony Count, Microbial
Diarrhea - epidemiology
Drinking Water - microbiology - standards
Guideline Adherence - standards
Heterotrophic Processes
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Logistic Models
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Control, Formal
Water Microbiology - standards
Water Quality - standards
Water Supply - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The Water Safety Plan (WSP) methodology, which aims to enhance safety of drinking water supplies, has been recommended by the World Health Organization since 2004. WSPs are now used worldwide and are legally required in several countries. However, there is limited systematic evidence available demonstrating the effectiveness of WSPs on water quality and health. Iceland was one of the first countries to legislate the use of WSPs, enabling the analysis of more than a decade of data on impact of WSP. The objective was to determine the impact of WSP implementation on regulatory compliance, microbiological water quality, and incidence of clinical cases of diarrhea. Surveillance data on water quality and diarrhea were collected and analyzed. The results show that HPC (heterotrophic plate counts), representing microbiological growth in the water supply system, decreased statistically significant with fewer incidents of HPC exceeding 10 cfu per mL in samples following WSP implementation and noncompliance was also significantly reduced (p
PubMed ID
22679926 View in PubMed
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Can pelagic ciliates indicate vertical variation in the water quality status of western Arctic pelagic ecosystems?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295582
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Aug; 133:182-190
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Guangjian Xu
EunJin Yang
Yong Jiang
Kyung-Ho Cho
Jinyoung Jung
Youngju Lee
Sung-Ho Kang
Author Affiliation
Division of Polar Ocean Science, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon 21990, Republic of Korea.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Aug; 133:182-190
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Ammonia - analysis
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
Chlorophyll - analysis
Ciliophora
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Oceans and Seas
Seasons
Water Quality
Abstract
The vertical pattern of pelagic ciliate communities was observed at eight layers in the Chukchi Sea and the northern Bering Sea of the western Arctic Ocean during the summer sea-ice reduction period (August 5 to August 24, 2016). A total of 44 ciliate species were identified, with seven species dominated the communities in the water column. Multivariate and univariate analyses demonstrated that: (1) community structures of ciliates vary significantly among eight water depths; (2) variations in the vertical distribution of ciliates were significantly correlated with changes in physicochemical variables, especially the ammonia; (3) the distributions of the three dominant species were significantly and positively related to the chlorophyll a and ammonia concentrations; and (4) species richness and abundance were significantly and positively correlated with the concentrations of ammonia and chlorophyll a. These results suggest that pelagic ciliates may reflect vertical variations in the water quality status of western Arctic ecosystems.
PubMed ID
30041306 View in PubMed
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[CHANGING OF PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF NON-CONTACT (ELECTROCHEMICAL) ACTIVATED DRINKING WATER IS ASSOCIATED WITH INDUCTION OF GENOMIC INSTABILITY OF CULTIVATED HUMAN BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273976
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016;95(3):233-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
O V Zatsepina
F I Ingel
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016;95(3):233-41
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drinking Water - adverse effects - analysis - chemistry
Electrochemical Techniques - methods
Environmental Monitoring - methods - statistics & numerical data
Genomic Instability - drug effects
Humans
Lymphocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Micronucleus Tests - methods
Public Health - methods - statistics & numerical data
Russia - epidemiology
Water Purification - methods - standards
Water Quality - standards
Abstract
In the article there are presented data which are the fragment of large multidisciplinary study of genetic safety of non-contact electrochemically activated water (NAW). The aim of this study was the analysis of the relation of impacts of genomic instability (micronucleus test with cytochalasin B) detected in human blood cells, cultured in medias prepared on the base of these NAWs, with physical and chemical properties of these NaWs. In experiments there were used catholytes and anolytes obtained by activation of osmotic, tap and dining bottled water As a result of such activation, all waters were shown to acquire the ability to induce genomic instability in cellular cultures. Notably in cell cultures on catholytes and anolytes these effects differed between themselves and have been associated with different physical and chemical properties of the NAWs.
PubMed ID
27266021 View in PubMed
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Chemical and microbial characteristics of municipal drinking water supply systems in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297661
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32926-32937
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Kiley Daley
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Rob C Jamieson
Jenny L Hayward
Greg S Piorkowski
Wendy Krkosek
Graham A Gagnon
Heather Castleden
Kristen MacNeil
Joanna Poltarowicz
Emmalina Corriveau
Amy Jackson
Justine Lywood
Yannan Huang
Author Affiliation
Centre for Water Resources Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32926-32937
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Chlorine - analysis
Disinfection - methods
Drinking Water - analysis - chemistry - microbiology
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Family Characteristics
Fresh Water - analysis - chemistry - microbiology
Halogenation
Humans
Nunavut
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Water Microbiology
Water Purification - methods
Water Quality
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
Drinking water in the vast Arctic Canadian territory of Nunavut is sourced from surface water lakes or rivers and transferred to man-made or natural reservoirs. The raw water is at a minimum treated by chlorination and distributed to customers either by trucks delivering to a water storage tank inside buildings or through a piped distribution system. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical and microbial drinking water quality from source to tap in three hamlets (Coral Harbour, Pond Inlet and Pangnirtung-each has a population of 0.2 mg/L free chlorine). Some buildings in the four communities contained manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and/or lead (Pb) concentrations above Health Canada guideline values for the aesthetic (Mn, Cu and Fe) and health (Pb) objectives. Corrosion of components of the drinking water distribution system (household storage tanks, premise plumbing) could be contributing to Pb, Cu and Fe levels, as the source water in three of the four communities had low alkalinity. The results point to the need for robust disinfection, which may include secondary disinfection or point-of-use disinfection, to prevent microbial risks in drinking water tanks in buildings and ultimately at the tap.
PubMed ID
28612312 View in PubMed
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95 records – page 1 of 10.