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Drinking water consumption patterns in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79386
Source
J Water Health. 2006 Dec;4(4):511-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Westrell Therese
Andersson Yvonne
Stenström Thor Axel
Author Affiliation
Food Control Department, Swedish National Food Administration, Box 622, SE 751 26 Uppsala. therese.westrell@slv.se
Source
J Water Health. 2006 Dec;4(4):511-22
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cold
Data Collection
Drinking
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Heat
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Water Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Water Supply - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Estimates on drinking water consumption are necessary in risk assessments on microbial hazards in drinking water. Large differences in consumption habits between countries have been reported. In order to establish estimates for the Swedish population, water consumption data from a waterborne outbreak investigation (157 people), a small water consumption study (75 people) and a large study on health and environmental factors (10,957 people) were analysed. A lognormal distribution for the daily direct/cold water intake in litres with mu = - 0.299 and sigma = 0.570 was fitted to the quantitative data, representing the general population. The average daily consumption of tap water as plain drinking water and as heated tap water, e.g. in coffee and tea, was 0.86 +/- 0.48 l and 0.94 +/- 0.69 l, respectively. Women consumed more cold tap water than did men, while men appeared to have a higher consumption of heated tap water. Cold tap water intake was highest in the oldest age group, (> or =70 years). The consumption of bottled water was very low (mean 0.06 l/d) when compared to other countries.
PubMed ID
17176821 View in PubMed
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Food and water security issues in Russia III: food- and waterborne diseases in the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, 2000-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105572
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:21856
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Vitaliy M Dorofeyev
Eugenia V Dushkina
Pavel R Alloyarov
Valery S Chupakhin
Yuliya N Sladkova
Tatjana A Kolesnikova
Kirill B Fridman
Lena Maria Nilsson
Birgitta Evengard
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Center, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:21856
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Far East - epidemiology
Food Contamination
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Russia - epidemiology
Sanitation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Sewage - adverse effects
Siberia - epidemiology
Water Microbiology
Water Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The food- and waterborne disease situation in Russia requires special attention. Poor quality of centralized water supplies and sewage systems, biological and chemical contamination of drinking water, as well as contamination of food products, promote widespread infectious diseases, significantly exceeding nationwide rates in the population living in the two-thirds of Russian northern territories.
The general aim was to assess the levels of food- and waterborne diseases in selected regions of Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East (for the period 2000-2011), and to compare disease levels among regions and with national levels in Russia.
This study is the first comparative assessment of the morbidity in these fields of the population of 18 selected regions of Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, using official statistical sources. The incidences of infectious and parasitic food- and waterborne diseases among the general population (including indigenous peoples) have been analyzed in selected regions (per 100,000 of population, averaged for 2000-2011).
Among compulsory registered infectious and parasitic diseases, there were high rates and widespread incidences in selected regions of shigellosis, yersiniosis, hepatitis A, tularaemia, giardiasis, enterobiasis, ascariasis, diphyllobothriasis, opistorchiasis, echinococcosis and trichinellosis.
Incidences of infectious and parasitic food- and waterborne diseases in the general population of selected regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East (2000-2011) are alarmingly high. Parallel solutions must be on the agenda, including improvement of sanitary conditions of cities and settlements in the regions, modernization of the water supply and of the sewage system. Provision and monitoring of the quality of the drinking water, a reform of the general healthcare system and the epidemiological surveillance (including gender-divided statistics), enhancement of laboratory diagnostics and the introduction of preventive actions are urgently needed.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.2153023940840
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2002 Jan-Feb;(1):6611899884
PubMed ID
24350064 View in PubMed
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[The ecological prerequisites for a worsening of the cercariasis situation in the cities of Russia (exemplified by the Moscow region)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219989
Source
Parazitologiia. 1993 Nov-Dec;27(6):441-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
S A Beér
S M German
Source
Parazitologiia. 1993 Nov-Dec;27(6):441-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Vectors
Ducks - parasitology
Ecology
Fresh Water
Humans
Larva
Lymnaea - parasitology
Moscow - epidemiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Schistosomatidae
Seasons
Sewage - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Skin Diseases, Parasitic - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Trematode Infections - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Water Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Conditions favouring the sharp increase of risk to be infected with cercariasis (caused by trematode cercariae Trichobilharzia ocellata Brumpt, 1931, Schistosomatidae) were examined in Moscow region (Russian Federation). Main factors of worsening the cercariasis situation are as follows. a) The increase of environment pollution by everyday wastages and the overgrowing with macrophytes in internal water basins of Moscow, that makes favourable conditions for the development of molluscs, which are intermediate hosts (mainly Lymnaea ovata and L. auricularia). b) The sharp increase of number of ducks (mainly mallard Anas platyrhyncos), which are final hosts, that is a result of bird escaping from farms (approximately in 60-70-th) and of high adaptation of these birds to city water basins. The detailed estimation of the cercariasis situation in 89 water basins of different types in Moscow and recreation zone was carried out. Examples of charting the zones with different risk degree of cercariasis infection are given. It is stated that at current time the cercariasis became a significant and widely distributed medical problem, which is most important in cities (including such large one as Moscow). Prophylaxis recommendations are proposed.
PubMed ID
8152847 View in PubMed
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