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[Accumulation of radionuclides in food chains of the Yenisei River after the nuclear power plant shutdown at the mining-and-chemical enterprise].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261756
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2014 Jul-Aug;54(4):405-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
T A Zotina
E A Trofimova
A D Karpov
A Ia Bolsunovskii
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2014 Jul-Aug;54(4):405-14
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biota
Chemical Industry
Fishes - metabolism
Food chain
Industrial Waste - analysis
Mining
Muscle, Skeletal - radionuclide imaging
Nuclear Power Plants
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Rivers - chemistry
Seasons
Siberia
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
Accumulation of artificial and natural radionuclides in the chains of food webs leading to non-predatory and piscivorous fish of the Yenisei River was investigated during one year before and three years after the shutdown of a nuclear power plant at the Mining-and-Chemical Combine (2009-2012). The activity of artificial radionuclides in the samples of biota ofthe Yenisei River (aquatic moss, gammarids, dace, grayling, pike) was estimated. The concentration of radionuclides with induced activity (51Cr, 54Mn, 58Co, 60Co, 65Zn, 141, 144Ce, 152, 154Eu, 239Np) decreased in the biomass of biota after the shutdown of the nuclear power plant; the concentration of 137Cs did not. Analysis of the accumulation factors (C(F)) allows us to expect the effective accumulation of 137Cs in the terminal level of the food web of the Yenisei River--pike (C(F) = 2.0-9.4), i.e. biomagnifications of radiocesium. Accumulation of artificial, radionuclides in non-predatory fish from gammarids was not effective (C(F)
PubMed ID
25775829 View in PubMed
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Assessment of doses to the offspring of the Techa River cohort due to intakes of radionuclides by the mother.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183429
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):609-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
M O Degteva
E I Tolstykh
M I Vorobiova
Author Affiliation
Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, 454076, Chelyabinsk, Russia. marina@urcrm.chel.su
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):609-14
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Burden
Bone Marrow - embryology - metabolism
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Cohort Studies
Computer simulation
Female
Fetus - metabolism
Fresh Water - analysis
Humans
Maternal Exposure
Maternal-Fetal Exchange - physiology
Models, Biological
Pregnancy
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive Waste - analysis
Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Radiometry - methods - standards
Russia
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Tissue Distribution
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
The Techa River was contaminated as a result of radioactive releases by the Mayak plutonium production facility in 1949-1956. The residents of riverside communities were exposed to internal irradiation from radionuclides ingested mainly with river water, and also to external gamma irradiation resulting from shoreline and flood-plain contamination. The most important role in population exposure was played by (89,90)Sr and 137Cs. The persons born after the onset of the contamination have been identified as the 'Techa River Offspring Cohort' (TROC). The TROC has the potential to provide direct data on health effects in progeny that resulted from exposure of a general population to chronic radiation. This report describes the results of the calculation of fetal doses due to intakes of radionuclides by their mothers. Particular attention has been given to fetal dose from 90Sr because this nuclide is the most significant in terms of population dose for the Techa River. The comparison of the fetal bone marrow doses evaluated using different approaches proposed in the literature has shown a large dispersal in dose values. The main cause of this is the difference in model assumptions simplifying some developmental aspects of fetal haematopoiesis and bone formation. This paper presents an analysis of these basic assumptions that could be useful for further improvements in fetal dosimetry.
PubMed ID
14527035 View in PubMed
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Estimation of human exposure to natural radionuclides using in vivo skull measurements.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183428
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):615-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
M. Muikku
T. Rahola
S. Pusa
L. Salonen
W. Wahl
P. Roth
T. Haninger
D. Kucheida
Author Affiliation
STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, FIN-00881 Helsinki, Finland. maarit.muikku@stuk.fi
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):615-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Female
Finland
Humans
Lead Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics - urine
Male
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry - methods
Skull - metabolism
Statistics as Topic
Uranium - analysis - pharmacokinetics - urine
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
In a preliminary study, in vivo skull measurements and in vitro urine measurements of 210Pb and nulU have been performed to find out the individual, chronic exposure to waterborne natural radionuclides of a small group of Finnish people. For their domestic water, the studied individuals use water from drilled wells containing elevated concentrations of natural uranium and its daughter nuclides ((234,235,238)U, 222Rn, (226,228)Ra, 210Po, 210Pb). Enhanced 210Pb and 235U activities were observed in several people. A positive correlation is observed between the U concentration in urine (microg d(-1)) and the number of counts (cpm) in the gamma ray energy peaks originating from the decay of 235U and 234Th respectively. Calibration of the detector set-up and the determination of background sources are in progress.
PubMed ID
14527036 View in PubMed
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General approach to dose reconstruction in the population exposed as a result of the release of radioactive wastes into the Techa River.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218675
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1994 Mar 1;142(1-2):49-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1994
Author
M O Degteva
V P Kozheurov
M I Vorobiova
Author Affiliation
Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, Chelyabinsk, Russian Federation.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1994 Mar 1;142(1-2):49-61
Date
Mar-1-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Body Burden
Dental Enamel - metabolism
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Fresh Water
Humans
Russia
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Tissue Distribution
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
Massive releases of fission products from the plutonium production facility 'Mayak' resulted in the years 1949-1956 in the contamination of the river Techa and its flood lands. This led to the exposure of the population in many riverside villages due to external gamma-rays and due to the incorporation of radionuclides, primarily Sr-90. The exposure situation is described and the reconstruction of doses due to external and due to internal radioactivity is explained. The internal dosimetry is based on large scale measurements of Sr-90 beta-rays on the surface of teeth that were begun in 1960, and on whole-body measurements of Sr-90 that were begun in 1974. The details of the analyses are presented in Part 2 of the present report. Average doses due to the external and the internal exposure are given for the residents of the different villages along the river Techa. In the total population of about 28,000 persons that were assessed, the medium dose to the red bone marrow was about 0.25 Gy and the mean dose about 0.4 Gy. In about 5% of the individuals the dose to the red bone marrow was estimated to be in excess of 1 Gy.
PubMed ID
8178136 View in PubMed
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Non-linear radionuclide transfer from the aquatic environment to fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207640
Source
Health Phys. 1997 Sep;73(3):488-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
G G Pyle
F V Clulow
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Health Phys. 1997 Sep;73(3):488-93
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cypriniformes - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Food contamination, radioactive
Fresh Water - chemistry
Health Physics
Humans
Mining
Nonlinear Dynamics
Ontario
Radiobiology
Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Risk assessment
Uranium
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
Uptake of 226Ra, 232Th, 230Th, and 228Th from water, sediment, and diet sources to bone and muscle of white suckers (Catostomus commersoni) was studied in sixteen lakes in the uranium-mining district of Ontario, Canada. Fish tissues did not increase linearly with environmental concentrations. The best relationship appears to be a power function. This has implications for the accuracy of radiological dose and risk estimates for uranium mining impacts, which are often based on a linear model.
PubMed ID
9287090 View in PubMed
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Strontium transfer from maternal skeleton to the fetus estimated on the basis of the Techa river data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193362
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 1998;79(1-4):307-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
E I Tolstykh
M O Degteva
V P Kozheurov
D S Burmistrov
Author Affiliation
Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk, Russia.
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 1998;79(1-4):307-10
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Bone and Bones - chemistry - metabolism
Calcium - metabolism
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Female
Fetus - chemistry - metabolism
Humans
Maternal Exposure
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Menarche
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology
Radioactive Hazard Release
Radiometry
Russia
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
Measurements of 90Sr in human bone of inhabitants of the Techa river region were started in 1951, and since 1974 the Techa river population has been studied with a whole-body counter. One of the dosimetric tasks that could be decided using data on 90Sr measurements is direct evaluation of strontium transfer to the fetus from the maternal skeleton. Six cases were selected for which 90Sr measurements were available both for stillborn infants and their mothers. The ratio of 90Sr concentrations in fetal bone to maternal bone for the year of pregnancy has been evaluated. Two clusters of values were found and the difference between clusters could be explained by age-dependent features of maternal bone formation and remodelling. When the mother's 90Sr intake occurred in the period of intensive compact bone growth, the transfer coefficient was very low (0.012-0.032). If 90Sr ingestion occurred during the woman's reproductive age, the transfer to fetus was equal to 0.21-0.26.
PubMed ID
11543361 View in PubMed
Less detail

Uranium gastrointestinal absorption: the f1 factor in humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183433
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):55-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
M. Limson Zamora
J M Zielinski
D. Meyerhof
G. Moodie
R. Falcomer
B. Tracy
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada (Address Locator: 6302 D1), 775 Brookfield Road, Ottawa, K1A 1C1, Canada. Maria_Zamora@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):55-60
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Administration, Oral
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body Burden
Canada
Digestive System - metabolism
Feces - chemistry
Female
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Humans
Intestinal Absorption - physiology
Male
Metabolic Clearance Rate - physiology
Middle Aged
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry - methods
Sex Factors
Uranium - administration & dosage - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - pharmacokinetics - urine
Abstract
The present investigation was undertaken by the Department of Health, Canada, to determine the most appropriate value to use for uranium gastrointestinal absorption (f1) in setting the guideline for drinking water. Fifty participants, free from medical problems, were recruited from two communities: a rural area where drinking water, supplied from drilled wells, contained elevated levels of uranium and an urban area where the water supplied by the municipal water system contained
PubMed ID
14526927 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.