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101 records – page 1 of 11.

[Activities of proteinases in invertebrate animals--potential objects of fish nutrition. Effects of temperature, pH, and heavy metals]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84976
Source
Zh Evol Biokhim Fiziol. 2007 Sep-Oct;43(5):404-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kuz'mina V V
Ushakova N V
Source
Zh Evol Biokhim Fiziol. 2007 Sep-Oct;43(5):404-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Cold Climate
Digestive Physiology
Digestive System - enzymology
Evolution
Fishes
Food chain
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Invertebrates - drug effects - enzymology - physiology
Metals, Heavy - toxicity
Peptide Hydrolases - metabolism
Phylogeny
Temperature
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
Differences in the degree of separate and combined effects of temperature, pH, and heavy metals (zinc, copper) on the trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteinase activities have been established in the whole body of some invertebrate animals - potential objects of fish nutrition: pond snail Lymnaeae stagnalis, orb snail Planorbis purpura, zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha, oligochaetae Tubifex sp. and Lumbriculus sp. in total, chironomid larvae Chironimus sp. and Ch. riparus, as well as crustacean zooplankton. It has been shown that enzymes of the potential victim at a low temperature can compensate low activity of intestinal proteinases of fish bentho- and planktophages.
PubMed ID
18038636 View in PubMed
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The Acute and Delayed Mortality of the Northern Krill (Meganyctiphanes norvegica) When Exposed to Hydrogen Peroxide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304631
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2020 Nov; 105(5):705-710
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2020
Author
Rosa H Escobar-Lux
Ole B Samuelsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Marine Research, Austevoll Research Station, Sauganeset 16, 5392, Storebø, Norway. rosa.escobar@hi.no.
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2020 Nov; 105(5):705-710
Date
Nov-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Aquaculture - methods
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ecosystem
Euphausiacea - drug effects - growth & development
Hydrogen Peroxide - toxicity
Lethal Dose 50
Norway
Seafood
Survival Analysis
Toxicity Tests, Acute
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
Bath treatment pharmaceuticals used to control sea lice infestations in the salmonid industry, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are released directly into the environment where non-target organisms are at risk of exposure. The aim of this study was to determine the threshold concentrations for mortality of the Northern krill, Meganyctiphanes norvegica, a major component of the north Atlantic marine ecosystem. To assess the lethal effects of H2O2, we carried out a series of 1 h acute toxicity tests and assessed mortality through a 48 h post-exposure period. One-hour exposure to 170 mg/L, corresponding to 10% of the recommended H2O2 treatment, caused 100% mortality and a subsequent acute median-lethal concentration LC50 value of 32.5 mg/L. Increased mortality was observed with time in all exposed groups, resulting in successively lower LC50 values during the post-exposure period. The suggested H2O2 concentrations have the potential of causing negative effects to the Northern krill.
PubMed ID
32979082 View in PubMed
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Acute and sub-lethal response to mercury in Arctic and boreal calanoid copepods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257349
Source
Aquat Toxicol. 2014 Oct;155:160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Ida Beathe Overjordet
Dag Altin
Torunn Berg
Bjørn Munro Jenssen
Geir Wing Gabrielsen
Bjørn Henrik Hansen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Biology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway; SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, Environmental Technology, N-7465 Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: ida.beathe.overjordet@sintef.no.
Source
Aquat Toxicol. 2014 Oct;155:160-5
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Copepoda - drug effects
Lethal Dose 50
Mercury - toxicity
Oceans and Seas
Temperature
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
Acute lethal toxicity, expressed as LC50 values, is a widely used parameter in risk assessment of chemicals, and has been proposed as a tool to assess differences in species sensitivities to chemicals between climatic regions. Arctic Calanus glacialis and boreal Calanus finmarchicus were exposed to mercury (Hg(2+)) under natural environmental conditions including sea temperatures of 2° and 10°C, respectively. Acute lethal toxicity (96 h LC50) and sub-lethal molecular response (GST expression; in this article gene expression is used as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression is also regulated, e.g., at translation and protein stability level) were studied. The acute lethal toxicity was monitored for 96 h using seven different Hg concentrations. The sub-lethal experiment was set up on the basis of nominal LC50 values for each species using concentrations equivalent to 50, 5 and 0.5% of their 96 h LC50 value. No significant differences were found in acute lethal toxicity between the two species. The sub-lethal molecular response revealed large differences both in response time and the fold induction of GST, where the Arctic species responded both faster and with higher mRNA levels of GST after 48 h exposure. Under the natural exposure conditions applied in the present study, the Arctic species C. glacialis may potentially be more susceptible to mercury exposure on the sub-lethal level.
PubMed ID
25036619 View in PubMed
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[Agricultural aspects of aquatic environmental toxicology (a review of literature)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163341
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Mar-Apr;(2):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
I I Rudneva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Mar-Apr;(2):24-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Agrochemicals - toxicity
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Russia - epidemiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
The impact of agriculture on water ecosystems is considered. The negative effects of entry of pesticides and biogens into the aquatic environment, which lead to its pollution and eutrophication and biota change and degradation, are shown. The author discusses whether it is necessary to meticulously monitor the aquatic environment in the intensively agricultural areas.
PubMed ID
17526221 View in PubMed
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An ecotoxicological assessment of mine tailings from three Norwegian mines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310435
Source
Chemosphere. 2019 Oct; 233:818-827
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2019
Author
Steven J Brooks
Carlos Escudero-Oñate
Adam D Lillicrap
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, NO-0349, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: sbr@niva.no.
Source
Chemosphere. 2019 Oct; 233:818-827
Date
Oct-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aquatic Organisms
Ecotoxicology
Environmental monitoring
Mining
Norway
Plants
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
The study assessed the environmental toxicity of three Norwegian mine tailings from Omya Hustadmarmor, Sydvaranger, and Sibelco, which are all released into a seawater recipient. Ecotoxicity assessments were performed on the overlying water extracted from the mine tailings, the transformation/dissolution waters obtained from the mine tailings, and whole sediment assessment using a suite of marine organisms including algae, Crustacea, and Mollusca. Overall, based on the toxicity evaluation of the transformation/dissolution data, Sibelco tailings resulted in the highest toxicity albeit at relatively high concentrations, followed by Sydvaranger and Hustadmarmor. Sibelco was the only mine where process chemicals were not used. In contrast, the Corophium sediment contact assay revealed a significantly higher toxicity exerted by Hustadmarmor tailings, which may indicate a physical impact of the fine tailings. The effects observed were discussed with respect to both the measured chemical concentrations of the tailings and the potential physical impact of the tailing particles on organism health.
PubMed ID
31200140 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of coral lophelia pertusa mucus as an analytical matrix for environmental monitoring: A preliminary proteomic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283027
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2016;79(13-15):647-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Fiona Provan
Mari Mæland Nilsen
Eivind Larssen
Kai-Erik Uleberg
Magne O Sydnes
Emily Lyng
Kjell Birger Øysæd
Thierry Baussant
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2016;79(13-15):647-57
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anthozoa - chemistry - drug effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Mucus - chemistry - drug effects
North Sea
Norway
Petroleum - toxicity
Proteome - drug effects
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization - methods
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
For the environmental monitoring of coral, mucus appears to be an appropriate biological matrix due to its array of functions in coral biology and the non-intrusive manner in which it can be collected. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of using mucus of the stony coral Lophelia pertusa (L. pertusa) as an analytical matrix for discovery of biomarkers used for environmental monitoring. More specifically, to assess whether a mass-spectrometry-based proteomic approach can be applied to characterize the protein composition of coral mucus and changes related to petroleum discharges at the seafloor. Surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) screening analyses of orange and white L. pertusa showed that the mucosal protein composition varies significantly with color phenotype, a pattern not reported prior to this study. Hence, to reduce variability from phenotype difference, L. pertusa white individuals only were selected to characterize in more detail the basal protein composition in mucus using liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In total, 297 proteins were identified in L. pertusa mucus of unexposed coral individuals. Individuals exposed to drill cuttings in the range 2 to 12 mg/L showed modifications in coral mucus protein composition compared to unexposed corals. Although the results were somewhat inconsistent between individuals and require further validation in both the lab and the field, this study demonstrated preliminary encouraging results for discovery of protein markers in coral mucus that might provide more comprehensive insight into potential consequences attributed to anthropogenic stressors and may be used in future monitoring of coral health.
PubMed ID
27484144 View in PubMed
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An indicator for effects of organic toxicants on lotic invertebrate communities: Independence of confounding environmental factors over an extensive river continuum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93021
Source
Environ Pollut. 2008 Dec;156(3):980-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Beketov Mikhail A
Liess Matthias
Author Affiliation
UFZ-Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of System Ecotoxicology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig, Germany. mikhail.beketov@ufz.de
Source
Environ Pollut. 2008 Dec;156(3):980-7
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biodiversity
Ecology - methods
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Food chain
Hazardous Substances - toxicity
Invertebrates - drug effects - physiology
Organic Chemicals - toxicity
Rivers
Siberia
Species Specificity
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
Distinguishing between effects of natural and anthropogenic environmental factors on ecosystems is a fundamental problem in environmental science. In river systems the longitudinal gradient of environmental factors is one of the most relevant sources of dissimilarity between communities that could be confounded with anthropogenic disturbances. To test the hypothesis that in macroinvertebrate communities the distribution of species' sensitivity to organic toxicants is independent of natural longitudinal factors, but depends on contamination with organic toxicants, we analysed the relationship between community sensitivity SPEAR(organic) (average community sensitivity to organic toxicants) and natural and anthropogenic environmental factors in a large-scale river system, from alpine streams to a lowland river. The results show that SPEAR(organic) is largely independent of natural longitudinal factors, but strongly dependent on contamination with organic toxicants (petrochemicals and synthetic surfactants). Usage of SPEAR(organic) as a stressor-specific longitude-independent measure will facilitate detection of community disturbance by organic toxicants.
PubMed ID
18547697 View in PubMed
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Antiestrogenicity and estrogenicity in leachates from solid waste deposits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147046
Source
Environ Toxicol. 2011 Jun;26(3):233-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Anders Svenson
Sofia Sjöholm
Ann-Sofie Allard
Lennart Kaj
Author Affiliation
IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Ltd, P. O. Box 210 60, S-100 31 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Environ Toxicol. 2011 Jun;26(3):233-9
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benzhydryl Compounds
Endocrine Disruptors - toxicity
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Estradiol - toxicity
Estrogen Receptor Modulators - toxicity
Estrogen Receptor alpha - metabolism
Estrogens - toxicity
Ethinyl Estradiol - toxicity
Humans
Phenols - toxicity
Refuse Disposal
Saccharomyces cerevisiae - drug effects
Seasons
Sewage - chemistry
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Water Pollution, Chemical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A great deal of effort has been devoted to developing new in vitro and in vivo methods to identify and classify endocrine disrupting chemicals that have been identified in environmental samples. In this study an in vitro test based on recombinant yeast strains transfected with genes for the human estrogen receptor a was adapted to examine the presence of estrogenic and antiestrogenic substances in six Swedish landfill leachates. Antiestrogenic effects were measured as inhibition of the estradiol induced response with the human estrogen receptor a, and quantified by comparison with the corresponding inhibitory effects of a known antiestrogen, hydroxytamoxifen. The estrogenicity was within the range of that determined in domestic sewage effluents, from below the limit of detection to 29 ng estradiol units L(-1). Antiestrogenicity was detected in some of the investigated landfill leachates, ranging between
PubMed ID
19950219 View in PubMed
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Apoptotic death in erythrocytes of lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis induced by ionomycin and tert-butyl hydroperoxide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280918
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2017 Apr;194:48-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Natalia I Agalakova
Tatiana I Ivanova
Gennadii P Gusev
Anna V Nazarenkova
Dina A Sufiyeva
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2017 Apr;194:48-60
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Apoptosis - drug effects
Biomarkers - blood - metabolism
Calcium Ionophores - toxicity
Cell Size
Cell Survival - drug effects
Erythrocytes - cytology - drug effects - metabolism
Female
Ionomycin - toxicity
Kinetics
Lampreys
Male
Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial - drug effects
Oxidants - toxicity
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
Rivers
Russia
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
tert-Butylhydroperoxide - toxicity
Abstract
The work examined the effects of Ca(2+) overload and oxidative damage on erythrocytes of river lamprey Lampetra fluvialtilis. The cells were incubated for 3h with 0.1-5µM Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin in combination with 2.5mM Ca(2+) and 10-100µM pro-oxidant agent tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP). The sensitivity of lamprey RBCs to studied compounds was evaluated by the kinetics of their death. Both toxicants induced dose- and time dependent phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization (annexin V-FITC labeling) and loss of membrane integrity (propidium iodide uptake). Highest doses of ionomycin (1-2µM) increased the number of PS-exposed erythrocytes to 7-9% within 3h, while 100µM tBHP produced up to 50% of annexin V-FITC-positive cells. Caspase inhibitor Boc-D-FMK (50µM), calpain inhibitor PD150606 (10µM) and broad protease inhibitor leupeptin (200µM) did not prevent ionomycin-induced PS externalization, whereas tBHP-triggered apoptosis was blunted by Boc-D-FMK. tBHP-dependent death of lamprey erythrocytes was accompanied by the decrease in relative cell size, loss of cell viability, activation of caspases 9 and 3/7, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, but all these processes were partially attenuated by Boc-D-FMK. None of examined death-associated events were observed in ionomycin-treated erythrocytes except activation of caspase-9. Incubation with ionomycin did not alter intracellular K(+) and Na(+) content, while exposure to tBHP resulted in 80% loss of K(+) and 2.8-fold accumulation of Na(+). Thus, lamprey erythrocytes appear to be more susceptible to oxidative damage. Ca(2+) overload does not activate the cytosolic death pathways in these cells.
PubMed ID
28163253 View in PubMed
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Arsenic concentrations in well water and risk of bladder and kidney cancer in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201045
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Sep;107(9):705-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
P. Kurttio
E. Pukkala
H. Kahelin
A. Auvinen
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, Kuopio, Finland. paivi.kurttio@ktl.fi
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Sep;107(9):705-10
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arsenic - analysis
Arsenic Poisoning - complications
Female
Finland
Fresh Water - analysis
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - chemically induced
Male
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - chemically induced
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
We assessed the levels of arsenic in drilled wells in Finland and studied the association of arsenic exposure with the risk of bladder and kidney cancers. The study persons were selected from a register-based cohort of all Finns who had lived at an address outside the municipal drinking-water system during 1967-1980 (n = 144,627). The final study population consisted of 61 bladder cancer cases and 49 kidney cancer cases diagnosed between 1981 and 1995, as well as an age- and sex-balanced random sample of 275 subjects (reference cohort). Water samples were obtained from the wells used by the study population at least during 1967-1980. The total arsenic concentrations in the wells of the reference cohort were low (median = 0.1 microg/L; maximum = 64 microg/L), and 1% exceeded 10 microg/L. Arsenic exposure was estimated as arsenic concentration in the well, daily dose, and cumulative dose of arsenic. None of the exposure indicators was statistically significantly associated with the risk of kidney cancer. Bladder cancer tended to be associated with arsenic concentration and daily dose during the third to ninth years prior to the cancer diagnosis; the risk ratios for arsenic concentration categories 0.1-0.5 and [Greater/equal to] 0.5 microg/L relative to the category with
Notes
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PubMed ID
10464069 View in PubMed
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101 records – page 1 of 11.