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Accumulated state of the Yukon River watershed: part I critical review of literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121234
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Monique G Dubé
Breda Muldoon
Julie Wilson
Karonhiakta'tie Bryan Maracle
Author Affiliation
Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick, Alberta, Canada. Dub.mon@hotmail.com
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animal Migration
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Climate change
Environment
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Fishes - physiology
Fresh Water - analysis - microbiology - parasitology
Humans
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Seasons
Water Movements
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Water Quality
Yukon Territory - epidemiology
Abstract
A consistent methodology for assessing the accumulating effects of natural and manmade change on riverine systems has not been developed for a whole host of reasons including a lack of data, disagreement over core elements to consider, and complexity. Accumulated state assessments of aquatic systems is an integral component of watershed cumulative effects assessment. The Yukon River is the largest free flowing river in the world and is the fourth largest drainage basin in North America, draining 855,000 km(2) in Canada and the United States. Because of its remote location, it is considered pristine but little is known about its cumulative state. This review identified 7 "hot spot" areas in the Yukon River Basin including Lake Laberge, Yukon River at Dawson City, the Charley and Yukon River confluence, Porcupine and Yukon River confluence, Yukon River at the Dalton Highway Bridge, Tolovana River near Tolovana, and Tanana River at Fairbanks. Climate change, natural stressors, and anthropogenic stresses have resulted in accumulating changes including measurable levels of contaminants in surface waters and fish tissues, fish and human disease, changes in surface hydrology, as well as shifts in biogeochemical loads. This article is the first integrated accumulated state assessment for the Yukon River basin based on a literature review. It is the first part of a 2-part series. The second article (Dubé et al. 2013a, this issue) is a quantitative accumulated state assessment of the Yukon River Basin where hot spots and hot moments are assessed outside of a "normal" range of variability.
PubMed ID
22927161 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of organotin compounds and mercury in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) from the Danish waters and West Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70531
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Nov 1;350(1-3):59-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2005
Author
Jakob Strand
Martin M Larsen
Christina Lockyer
Author Affiliation
National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Marine Ecology, P.O. Box 358, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. jak@dmu.dk
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Nov 1;350(1-3):59-71
Date
Nov-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Denmark
Environmental monitoring
Female
Greenland
Liver - chemistry - metabolism
Male
Mercury - analysis - metabolism
Organotin Compounds - analysis - metabolism
Phocoena - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Zinc - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
The concentrations of butyltin (summation operatorBT=TBT+DBT+MBT) and mercury (Hg) were determined in the liver of 35 harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), which were found dead along the coastlines or caught as by-catch in the Danish North Sea and the Inner Danish waters. In addition, three harbour porpoises hunted in West Greenland were analysed. High levels of butyltin and mercury, within the range of 68-4605 mg BT/kg ww and 0.22-92 mg Hg/kg ww, were found in the liver of the Danish harbour porpoises and both substances tend to accumulate with age. The levels in the harbour porpoise from West Greenland were 2.0-18 mg BT/kg ww and 6.3-6.9 mg Hg/kg ww, respectively. The concentrations of butyltin and mercury were both found to be higher in stranded than in by-caught harbour porpoises but only the butyltin concentration was significantly higher in stranded porpoises in the age group 1-5 years. These substances are suspected of inducing adverse effects on immune and endocrine systems in mammals and they may thereby pose a threat to the animals. This study suggests that organotin compounds are also important, when assessing the risks of contaminants on the health and viability of harbour porpoises in Danish waters.
PubMed ID
16227073 View in PubMed
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Aluminum smelter-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and flatfish health in the Kitimat marine ecosystem, British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265910
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2015 Apr 15;512-513:227-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2015
Author
Lyndal L Johnson
Gina M Ylitalo
Mark S Myers
Bernadita F Anulacion
Jon Buzitis
Tracy K Collier
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2015 Apr 15;512-513:227-39
Date
Apr-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum
Animals
British Columbia
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Fishes - physiology
Metallurgy
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
From 2000-2004 a monitoring study was conducted to evaluate the impacts of aluminum smelter-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on the health of fish in the marine waters of Kitimat, British Columbia, Canada. These waters are part of the historical fishing grounds of the Haisla First Nation, and since the 1950s the Alcan Primary Metal Company has operated an aluminum smelter at the head of the Kitimat Arm embayment. As a result, adjacent marine and estuarine sediments have been severely contaminated with a mixture of smelter-associated PAHs in the range of 10,000-100,000 ng/g dry wt. These concentrations are above those shown to cause adverse effects in fish exposed to PAHs in urban estuaries, but it was uncertain whether comparable effects would be seen at the Kitimat site due to limited bioavailability of smelter-derived PAHs. Over the 5-year study we conducted biennial collections of adult English sole (Parophrys vetulus) and sediment samples at the corresponding capture sites. Various tissue samples (e.g. liver, kidney, gonad, stomach contents) and bile were taken from each animal to determine levels of exposure and biological effects, and compare the uptake and toxicity of smelter-derived PAHs with urban mixtures of PAHs. Results showed significant intersite differences in concentrations of PAHs. Sole collected at sites nearest the smelter showed increased PAH exposure, as well as significantly higher prevalences of PAH-associated liver disease, compared to sites within Kitimat Arm that were more distant from the smelter. However, measures of PAH exposure (e.g., bile metabolites) were surprisingly high in sole from the reference sites outside of Kitimat Arm, though sediment and dietary PAHs at these sites were low, and fish from the areas showed no biological injury. PAH uptake, exposure, and biological effects in Kitimat English sole were relatively lower when compared to English sole collected from urban sites contaminated with PAH mixtures from other sources. These findings indicate that while smelter-associated PAHs in Kitimat Arm appear to be causing some injury to marine resources, they likely have reduced bioavailability, and thus reduced biological toxicity, compared to other environmental PAH mixtures.
PubMed ID
25625635 View in PubMed
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An integrative biological effects assessment of a mine discharge into a Norwegian fjord using field transplanted mussels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298407
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Dec 10; 644:1056-1069
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-10-2018
Author
S J Brooks
C Escudero-Oñate
T Gomes
L Ferrando-Climent
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, NO-0349 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: sbr@niva.no.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Dec 10; 644:1056-1069
Date
Dec-10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Estuaries
Mining
Mytilus - physiology
Norway
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Abstract
The blue mussel (Mytilus sp.) has been used to assess the potential biological effects of the discharge effluent from the Omya Hustadmarmor mine, which releases its tailings into the Frænfjord near Molde, Norway. Chemical body burden and a suite of biological effects markers were measured in mussels positioned for 8?weeks at known distances from the discharge outlet. The biomarkers used included: condition index (CI); stress on stress (SoS); micronuclei formation (MN); acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibition, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and Neutral lipid (NL) accumulation. Methyl triethanol ammonium (MTA), a chemical marker for the esterquat based flotation chemical (FLOT2015), known to be used at the mine, was detected in mussels positioned 1500?m and 2000?m downstream from the discharge outlet. Overall the biological responses indicated an increased level of stress in mussels located closest to the discharge outlet. The same biomarkers (MN, SoS, NL) were responsible for the integrated biological response (IBR/n) of the two closest stations and indicates a response to a common point source. The integrated biological response index (IBR/n) reflected the expected level of exposure to the mine effluent, with the highest IBR/n calculated in mussels positioned closest to the discharge. Principal component analysis (PCA) also showed a clear separation between the mussel groups, with the most stressed mussels located closest to the mine tailing outlet. Although not one chemical factor could explain the increased stress on the mussels, highest metal (As, Co, Ni, Cd, Zn, Ag, Cu, Fe) and MTA concentrations were detected in the mussel group located closest to the mine discharge.
PubMed ID
30743819 View in PubMed
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Aquatic and terrestrial plant species with potential to remove heavy metals from storm-water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181764
Source
Int J Phytoremediation. 2003;5(3):211-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Asa Fritioff
Maria Greger
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Botany, Stockholm University, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden. fritioff@botan.su.se
Source
Int J Phytoremediation. 2003;5(3):211-24
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ecosystem
Environmental pollution - prevention & control
Humans
Metals, Heavy - analysis - metabolism
Plant Roots
Plants - metabolism
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Water supply
Abstract
Remediation of storm-water polluted with heavy metals should be possible in percolation systems, ponds, or wetlands. The aim of this work was to find plant species for such systems that are efficient in the uptake of Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb. Plants were collected from percolation and wetland areas and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations. Results showed that submersed and free-floating plants had the capacity to take up high levels of Cu, Zn, and Pb into their shoots. With roots having a concentration factor above 1, the terrestrial plants show efficient stabilization of Cd and Zn and emergent plants show corresponding stabilisation of Zn. In addition, Potamogeton natans, Alisma plantago-aquatica, and Filipendula ulmaria were used in a controlled experiment. The shoots of P. natans and the roots of A. plantago-aquatica were found to accumulate even higher concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Pb than found in the field-harvested plants. Similar results were found for Cd in shoots and Pb in roots of F. ulmaria. Our conclusion is that submersed plant species seem to be the most efficient for removal of heavy metals from storm-water.
PubMed ID
14750429 View in PubMed
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Assessment of mercury and selenium tissular concentrations and total mercury body burden in 6 Steller sea lion pups from the Aleutian Islands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264321
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2014 May 15;82(1-2):175-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2014
Author
Lucero Correa
Lorrie D Rea
Rebecca Bentzen
Todd M O'Hara
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2014 May 15;82(1-2):175-82
Date
May-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Body Burden
Bone and Bones - chemistry - metabolism
Female
Hair - chemistry - metabolism
Liver - chemistry - metabolism
Male
Mercury - analysis - metabolism
Muscles - chemistry - metabolism
Sea Lions - metabolism
Selenium - analysis - metabolism
Tissue Distribution
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
Concentrations of total mercury ([THg]) and selenium ([TSe]) were measured in several tissue compartments in Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) pups; in addition we determined specific compartment and body burdens of THg. Compartmental and body burdens were calculated by multiplying specific compartment fresh weight by the [THg] (summing compartment burdens equals body burden). In all 6 pup tissue sets (1) highest [THg] was in hair, (2) lowest [THg] was in bone, and (3) pelt, muscle and liver burdens contributed the top three highest percentages of THg body burden. In 5 of 6 pups the Se:Hg molar ratios among compartments ranged from 0.9 to 43.0. The pup with the highest hair [THg] had Se:Hg molar ratios in 9 of 14 compartments that were ? 0.7 potentially indicating an inadequate [TSe] relative to [THg].
Notes
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PubMed ID
24661459 View in PubMed
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Bacteria-degraders as the base of an amperometric biosensor for detection of anionic surfactants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9957
Source
Biosens Bioelectron. 2002 Aug;17(8):635-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
L. Taranova
I. Semenchuk
T. Manolov
P. Iliasov
A. Reshetilov
Author Affiliation
Institute of Colloid Chemistry and Chemistry of Water, Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, 03142 bvd. Vernadsky, 42, Kiev, Ukraine. taranova@public.ua.net
Source
Biosens Bioelectron. 2002 Aug;17(8):635-40
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcaligenes - metabolism
Biodegradation
Biosensing Techniques - methods - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
Pseudomonas - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate - analysis - metabolism
Surface-Active Agents - analysis - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
Several strains belonging to genera Pseudomonas and Achromobacter and characterized by the ability to degrade anionic surfactants were tested as potential bases of microbial biosensors for surfactant detection. For each strain the substrate specificity and stability of sensor signals were studied. The total amount of the substrates tested (including carbohydrates, alcohols, aromatics, organic acids, etc.) was equal to 60; the maximal signals were observed towards the anionic surfactants. The lower limit of detection for sodium dodecyl sulfate used as a model surfactant was in the field of 1 microM for all the strains. The created microbial biosensor model can extend the practical possibilities for rapid evaluation of surfactants in water media.
PubMed ID
12052348 View in PubMed
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Betula pendula: A Promising Candidate for Phytoremediation of TCE in Northern Climates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267432
Source
Int J Phytoremediation. 2015;17(1-6):9-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jeffrey Lewis
Ulf Qvarfort
Jan Sjöström
Source
Int J Phytoremediation. 2015;17(1-6):9-15
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Betula - chemistry - metabolism
Biodegradation, Environmental
Environmental Restoration and Remediation - methods
Groundwater - analysis
Metals, Heavy - analysis - metabolism
Soil Pollutants - analysis - metabolism
Sweden
Trichloroethylene - analysis - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
Betula pendula (Silver birch) trees growing on two contaminated sites were evaluated to assess their capacity to phytoscreen and phytoremediate chlorinated aliphatic compounds and heavy metals. Both locations are industrially-contaminated properties in central Sweden. The first was the site of a trichloroethylene (TCE) spill in the 1980s while the second was polluted with heavy metals by burning industrial wastes. In both cases, sap and sapwood from Silver birch trees were collected and analyzed for either chlorinated aliphatic compounds or heavy metals. These results were compared to analyses of the surface soil, vadose zone pore air and groundwater. Silver birch demonstrated the potential to phytoscreen and possibly phytoremediate TCE and related compounds, but it did not demonstrate the ability to effectively phytoextract heavy metals when compared with hyperaccumulator plants. The capacity of Silver birch to phytoremediate TCE appears comparable to tree species that have been employed in field-scale TCE phytoremediation efforts, such as Populus spp. and Eucalyptus sideroxylon rosea.
PubMed ID
25174420 View in PubMed
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Bioaccumulation and trophodynamics of the antidepressants sertraline and fluoxetine in laboratory-constructed, 3-level aquatic food chains.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283975
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2017 Apr;36(4):1029-1037
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Marja L Boström
Gustaf Ugge
Jan Åke Jönsson
Olof Berglund
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2017 Apr;36(4):1029-1037
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antidepressive Agents - analysis - metabolism
Aquatic Organisms - metabolism
Fluoxetine - analysis - metabolism
Food chain
Models, Theoretical
Sertraline - analysis - metabolism
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
Although reports of pharmaceutical bioconcentration in aquatic organisms are increasing, less is known about trophic transfer in aquatic food webs. The bioaccumulation and trophodynamics of sertraline and fluoxetine, 2 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) frequently detected in aquatic environments, were tested by exposing constructed aquatic food chains to SSRIs under controlled laboratory conditions. Both of these ionizable, weak base pharmaceuticals showed lower bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) with increasing trophic level (i.e., no biomagnifications) in 2 3-level food chains (Acer platanoides, fed to Asellus aquaticus, in turn fed to Notonecta glauca or Pungitius pungitius). Mean sertraline BAFs in A. platanoides, A. aquaticus, N. glauca, and P. pungitus were 2200?L/kg, 360?L/kg, 26?L/kg, and 49?L/kg, respectively, and mean fluoxetine BAFs 1300?L/kg, 110?L/kg, 11?L/kg, and 41?L/kg, respectively. The weak influence of diet was further demonstrated by measured BAFs being equal to or lower than measured bioconcentration factors (BCFs). Organism lipid content was not positively correlated with BAFs, suggesting that other processes are driving interspecific differences in SSRI bioaccumulation. The empirically derived parameter values were introduced into a proposed bioaccumulation model, and a poor correlation was found between modeled and empirical BAFs (predicted r(2) ?=?-0.63). In conclusion, the apparent lack of biomagnification of these ionizable pharmaceuticals suggests that environmental concern should not necessarily focus only on higher trophic levels, but also on species showing high BCFs at any trophic level. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1029-1037. © 2016 SETAC.
PubMed ID
27696515 View in PubMed
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Bioaccumulation of PCBs from microplastics in Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus): An experimental study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287487
Source
Chemosphere. 2017 Nov;186:10-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Lisa I Devriese
Bavo De Witte
A Dick Vethaak
Kris Hostens
Heather A Leslie
Source
Chemosphere. 2017 Nov;186:10-16
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adsorption
Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - drug effects
Animals
Microspheres
Nephropidae - metabolism
Norway
Plastics
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - pharmacokinetics
Polyethylene
Polystyrenes
Waste Products
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
Plastic debris acts as a sorbent phase for hydrophobic organic compounds like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Chemical partitioning models predict that the ingestion of microplastics with adsorbed chemicals in the field will tend not to result in significant net desorption of the chemical to the organism's tissues. This is expected due to the often limited differences in fugacity of the chemical between the indigestible plastic materials and the tissues, which are typically already exposed in the same environment to the same chemicals as the plastic. However laboratory trials validating these model predictions are scarce. In this study, PCB-loaded microplastics were offered to field-collected Norway lobsters (Nephrops norvegicus) during in vivo feeding laboratory experiments. Each ingestion experiment was repeated with and without loading a mixture of ten PCB congeners onto plastic microspheres (MS) made of polyethylene (PE) and polystyrene (PS) with diameters of either 500-600 µm or 6 µm. We observed that the presence of chemicals adsorbed to ingested microplastics did not lead to significant bioaccumulation of the chemicals in the exposed organisms. There was a limited uptake of PCBs in Nephrops tail tissue after ingestion of PCB-loaded PE MS, while almost no PCBs were detected in animals exposed to PS MS. In general, our results demonstrated that after 3 weeks of exposure the ingestion of plastic MS themselves did not affect the nutritional state of wild Nephrops.
PubMed ID
28759812 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.