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Accumulated state of the Yukon River watershed: part I critical review of literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121234
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Monique G Dubé
Breda Muldoon
Julie Wilson
Karonhiakta'tie Bryan Maracle
Author Affiliation
Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick, Alberta, Canada. Dub.mon@hotmail.com
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animal Migration
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Climate change
Environment
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Fishes - physiology
Fresh Water - analysis - microbiology - parasitology
Humans
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Seasons
Water Movements
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Water Quality
Yukon Territory - epidemiology
Abstract
A consistent methodology for assessing the accumulating effects of natural and manmade change on riverine systems has not been developed for a whole host of reasons including a lack of data, disagreement over core elements to consider, and complexity. Accumulated state assessments of aquatic systems is an integral component of watershed cumulative effects assessment. The Yukon River is the largest free flowing river in the world and is the fourth largest drainage basin in North America, draining 855,000 km(2) in Canada and the United States. Because of its remote location, it is considered pristine but little is known about its cumulative state. This review identified 7 "hot spot" areas in the Yukon River Basin including Lake Laberge, Yukon River at Dawson City, the Charley and Yukon River confluence, Porcupine and Yukon River confluence, Yukon River at the Dalton Highway Bridge, Tolovana River near Tolovana, and Tanana River at Fairbanks. Climate change, natural stressors, and anthropogenic stresses have resulted in accumulating changes including measurable levels of contaminants in surface waters and fish tissues, fish and human disease, changes in surface hydrology, as well as shifts in biogeochemical loads. This article is the first integrated accumulated state assessment for the Yukon River basin based on a literature review. It is the first part of a 2-part series. The second article (Dubé et al. 2013a, this issue) is a quantitative accumulated state assessment of the Yukon River Basin where hot spots and hot moments are assessed outside of a "normal" range of variability.
PubMed ID
22927161 View in PubMed
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Acidification remediation alternatives: exploring the temporal dimension with cost benefit analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143359
Source
Ambio. 2010 Feb;39(1):40-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Göran Bostedt
Stefan Löfgren
Sophia Innala
Kevin Bishop
Author Affiliation
Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 901 83 Umeå, Sweden. goran.bostedt@sekon.slu.se
Source
Ambio. 2010 Feb;39(1):40-8
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conservation of Natural Resources
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - economics
Environmental Remediation - economics
Fresh Water - analysis - chemistry
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Socioeconomic Factors
Soil - analysis
Sulfur Compounds
Sweden
Time Factors
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects - economics
Abstract
Acidification of soils and surface waters caused by acid deposition is still a major problem in southern Scandinavia, despite clear signs of recovery. Besides emission control, liming of lakes, streams, and wetlands is currently used to ameliorate acidification in Sweden. An alternative strategy is forest soil liming to restore the acidified upland soils from which much acidified runoff originates. This cost-benefit analysis compared these liming strategies with a special emphasis on the time perspective for expected benefits. Benefits transfer was used to estimate use values for sport ffishing and nonuse values in terms of existence values. The results show that large-scale forest soil liming is not socioeconomically profitable, while lake liming is, if it is done efficiently-in other words, if only acidified surface waters are treated. The beguiling logic of "solving" an environmental problem at its source (soils), rather than continuing to treat the symptoms (surface waters), is thus misleading.
Notes
Cites: Nature. 2007 Nov 22;450(7169):537-4018033294
PubMed ID
20496651 View in PubMed
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Affordable and efficient adsorbent for arsenic removal from rural water supply systems in Newfoundland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298550
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Apr 10; 660:158-168
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-10-2019
Author
Javid Shadbahr
Tahir Husain
Author Affiliation
EnviroRisk International, Inc., 36 Pearson Street, St. John's, NL A1A 3R1, Canada.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Apr 10; 660:158-168
Date
Apr-10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adsorption
Arsenic - analysis
Coal Ash - chemistry
Drinking Water - analysis
Newfoundland and Labrador
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Purification - instrumentation
Water Wells
Abstract
The fly ash from the Corner Brook Pulp and Paper (CBPP) mill was used in this study as the raw material for the preparation of a low-cost adsorbent for arsenic removal from the well water of Bell Island. The CBPP fly ash was physically activated in two different ways: (a) activation with pure CO2 (CAC) with the iodine number and methylene value of 704.53?mg/g and 292.32?mg/g, respectively; and (b) activation with a mixture of CO2 and steam (CSAC) with the iodine number and methylene value of 1119.98?mg/g and 358.95?mg/g, respectively, at the optimized temperature of 850?°C and the time of 2?h for both activations. The BET surface areas of the CAC and CSAC at the optimized conditions were 847.26?m2/g and 1146.25?m2/g, respectively. The optimized CSAC was used for impregnation with iron (III) chloride (FeCl3) with different concentrations (0.01?M to 1?M). The study shows that the adsorbent impregnated with 0.1?M FeCl3 is the most efficient adsorbent for arsenic removal. Isotherm analysis shows that the Langmuir model better describes the equilibrium behavior of the arsenic adsorption from both local well water and synthesized water compared to the other models. The maximum arsenic adsorption capacity was 35.6?µg/g of carbon for local well water and 1428.6?µg/g of carbon for synthesized water. Furthermore, the kinetic behavior of arsenic adsorption from synthesized and local well water was well depicted by the pseudo-second order kinetic model.
PubMed ID
30639713 View in PubMed
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Altitudinal and thermal gradients of hepatic Cyp1A gene expression in natural populations of Salmo trutta from high mountain lakes and their correlation with organohalogen loads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98080
Source
Environ Pollut. 2010 May;158(5):1392-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Sergio Jarque
Eva Gallego
Mireia Bartrons
Jordi Catalan
Joan O Grimalt
Benjamin Piña
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18, 08034-Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2010 May;158(5):1392-8
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altitude
Animals
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - genetics - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Fish Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Fresh Water - analysis
Gene Expression - drug effects
Hydrocarbons, Halogenated - analysis - toxicity
Liver - enzymology
Norway
Temperature
Trout - metabolism
Abstract
The biomarker of xenobiotic exposure cytochrome p450A1 (Cyp1A) was used to analyze the biological response to chemical pollution in Salmo trutta (brown trout) from nine high mountain European lakes in Norway, Tatras, Tyrol, and central Pyrenees. Hepatic Cyp1A mRNA levels correlated both with the reciprocal of absolute annual average air temperatures of the sampled lakes and with muscle concentrations of several hydrophobic organohalogen compounds (OC), including chlorinated polychlorobiphenyls (PCB), DDE, and DDT. The correlation between Cyp1A expression and OC content was observed across the whole temperature range (between -0.7 degrees C and +6.2 degrees C), but also in the absence of any thermal gradient. We concluded that airborne pollutants accumulate in high mountain lake fish at concentrations high enough to increase Cyp1A expression, among other possible effects. As geographical distribution of semi-volatile OC is strongly influenced by air temperatures, future climate modifications will potentially enhance their physiological effects in lake ecosystems.
PubMed ID
20149942 View in PubMed
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[Ambient air pollution and human health in the town of Nizhnekamsk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188786
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 May-Jun;(3):12-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
F F Dautov
R F Khakimova
N G Gabitov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 May-Jun;(3):12-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Chemical Industry
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Skin Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Water - analysis
Abstract
The paper gives hygienic characteristics of ambient air pollution and examines human health in the town of Nizhnekamsk. There are worse demographic indices. In the structure of morbidity, respiratory diseases make up the largest proportion (44.4%), injuries and poisoning rank next (16.9%), skin and skin fate occupy the third place (5.4%). There are the highest morbidity rates in the polluted areas of the town. In these areas, respiratory allergoses (preasthma and bronchial asthma) occur more frequently than in the controls.
PubMed ID
12198892 View in PubMed
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Analytical procedures for estimating milk intake and yield in steady-state and nonsteady-state systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4606
Source
J Dairy Sci. 1988 May;71(5):1189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1988
Author
D F Holleman
R G White
P J Lambert
Author Affiliation
Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks 99775.
Source
J Dairy Sci. 1988 May;71(5):1189-97
Date
May-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Suckling - physiology
Body Water - analysis
Cattle - physiology
Female
Lactation - physiology
Models, Biological
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
A tracer method for determining milk intake, introduced earlier, was based on the transfer of tritiated water from a lactating female to a nuring offspring via milk. The analysis of the tracer data assumed a steady state system, i.e., the total body water of the offspring was assumed to be constant over the measurement period. This paper discusses the potential errors in the milk intake estimates in applications where steady-state does not exist. Three analytical procedures are considered and include the application of 1) steady state equations for a nonsteady-state system, 2) analytical solutions to nonsteady-state equations, and 3) a computer modeling program, SAAM-27. The application of steady-state equations is the simplest procedure and may yield acceptable estimates if the growth rate of the nuring offspring is low. The analytical solution procedure yields acceptable estimates at high growth rates of the nursing offspring but becomes unacceptable at low growth rates. The SAAM program requires sophisticated computer hardware and programming; however, the procedure yields the best estimates of milk intake in applications ranging from steady-state to high growth rates.
PubMed ID
3397415 View in PubMed
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An assay for selecting high risk population for gastric cancer by studying environmental factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27898
Source
Neoplasma. 1976;23(3):333-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
G. Málnási
S. Jakab
A. Incze
A. Apostol
J M Csapó
E. Szabó
J J Csapó
K. Jakab
Source
Neoplasma. 1976;23(3):333-41
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Environment
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Food
Geology
Humans
Male
Probability
Risk
Romania
Sex Factors
Sodium Chloride - analysis
Soil - analysis
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Water - analysis
Abstract
Gastric cancer mortality incidence data registered in two different areas of Eastern Transylvania (Roumania) were reported related to 325,000 inhabitants from the period of 1951-1972. The findings were compared to some geographical environmental factors deriving from an area of 13,300 km with 905,700 inhabitants. A 2-3.5 times larger incidence of gastric cancer (75-140 per 100,000/year) was found in some selected geographical areas of the intermontane depressions of Gheorgheni and Ciuc in comparison to hilly area of Transylvanian Tableland. The difference might be explained by some unknown environmental gastric cancer risk factors. Of the natural factors, the presence of magmatic substrata shows a significant degree of correlation. The main pedological factor seems to be badly drained pseudoglyied podzolic and peaty soils of low pH and high content of organic matter. Sofs drinking waters also may be involved as risk factor. High altitude, cold climate determining a restricted assortiment of cultivated plants, the successive production of vegetal and animal food on the same soil for livelong periods and several generations, especially in isolated rural areas, seem to represent gastric cancer risk factors. According to authors' opinion a survey of the high-risk population selected on the basis of the environmental factors, especially of the persons suffering from gastric disorders considered today possible precursors of gastric cancer, may offer some progress in detecting early gastric malignancy in the future.
PubMed ID
958535 View in PubMed
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Anencephalus and drinking water composition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249965
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1977 May;105(5):460-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1977
Author
J M Elwood
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1977 May;105(5):460-8
Date
May-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anencephaly - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Calcium - analysis
Canada
Congenital Abnormalities - mortality
Drinking
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Fresh Water - analysis
Humans
Hydrocephalus - mortality
Lithium - analysis
Magnesium - analysis
Pregnancy
Spinal Dysraphism - mortality
Water - analysis
Water Softening
Water supply
Abstract
The mortality rate (stillbirths and infant deaths) from anencephalus from 1950-1969 in 36 cities of over 50,000 population in Canada showed a negative association (r = -.39) with the concentration of magnesium in water sampled at domestic taps. The mortality rates showed negative associations with mean income and longitude, and a multiple regression model using the three factors showed significant effects of each and accounted for 69% of the intercity variation in rates. There were no significant associations seen with water calcium concentration or total hardness. Income, magnesium and longitude were also negatively associated with mortality rates from spina bifida, hydrocephalus, other congenital abnormalities, and total stillbirth and infant death rates, but the association with magnesium was significant only for total stillbirths. The negative association of anencephalus mortality and magnesium levels was also seen in a sample of 14 smaller towns in Ontario.
PubMed ID
324271 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study of child health and nutrition in a northern Swedish County. II. Methodological study of the recall technique.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44162
Source
Nutr Metab. 1970;12(6):321-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970

Anomalously weak Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning during the past 150 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294791
Source
Nature. 2018 04; 556(7700):227-230
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
04-2018
Author
David J R Thornalley
Delia W Oppo
Pablo Ortega
Jon I Robson
Chris M Brierley
Renee Davis
Ian R Hall
Paola Moffa-Sanchez
Neil L Rose
Peter T Spooner
Igor Yashayaev
Lloyd D Keigwin
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University College London, London, UK. d.thornalley@cantab.net.
Source
Nature. 2018 04; 556(7700):227-230
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Atlantic Ocean
Climate Change - statistics & numerical data
Convection
Fresh Water - analysis
Greenland
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
History, Medieval
Ice Cover - chemistry
Newfoundland and Labrador
Oceans and Seas
Reproducibility of Results
Seawater - analysis
Time Factors
Water Movements
Abstract
The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is a system of ocean currents that has an essential role in Earth's climate, redistributing heat and influencing the carbon cycle1, 2. The AMOC has been shown to be weakening in recent years 1 ; this decline may reflect decadal-scale variability in convection in the Labrador Sea, but short observational datasets preclude a longer-term perspective on the modern state and variability of Labrador Sea convection and the AMOC1, 3-5. Here we provide several lines of palaeo-oceanographic evidence that Labrador Sea deep convection and the AMOC have been anomalously weak over the past 150 years or so (since the end of the Little Ice Age, LIA, approximately AD 1850) compared with the preceding 1,500 years. Our palaeoclimate reconstructions indicate that the transition occurred either as a predominantly abrupt shift towards the end of the LIA, or as a more gradual, continued decline over the past 150 years; this ambiguity probably arises from non-AMOC influences on the various proxies or from the different sensitivities of these proxies to individual components of the AMOC. We suggest that enhanced freshwater fluxes from the Arctic and Nordic seas towards the end of the LIA-sourced from melting glaciers and thickened sea ice that developed earlier in the LIA-weakened Labrador Sea convection and the AMOC. The lack of a subsequent recovery may have resulted from hysteresis or from twentieth-century melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet 6 . Our results suggest that recent decadal variability in Labrador Sea convection and the AMOC has occurred during an atypical, weak background state. Future work should aim to constrain the roles of internal climate variability and early anthropogenic forcing in the AMOC weakening described here.
Notes
CommentIn: Nature. 2018 Apr;556(7700):149 PMID 29643490
CommentIn: Nature. 2018 Apr;556(7700):180-181 PMID 29636556
PubMed ID
29643484 View in PubMed
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226 records – page 1 of 23.