Skip header and navigation

Refine By

169 records – page 1 of 17.

Aalborg, Denmark: a role model for waste management practices to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98696
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2009 Nov;27(9):837-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009

Advances in NORM management in Norway and the application of ICRP's 2007 recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119562
Source
Ann ICRP. 2012 Oct-Dec;41(3-4):332-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Liland
P. Strand
I. Amundsen
H. Natvig
M. Nilsen
R. Lystad
K E Frogg
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, P.O. Box 55, No-1332 Osteras, Norway. astrid.liland@nrpa.no
Source
Ann ICRP. 2012 Oct-Dec;41(3-4):332-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Industry
Environmental Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Extraction and Processing Industry
Government Regulation
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
International Agencies
Norway
Oil and Gas Fields
Radiation Protection - standards
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Waste Management - standards
Abstract
In Norway, the largest reported quantities of radioactive discharges and radioactive waste containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) come from the oil and gas sector, and smaller quantities of other NORM waste are also produced by industrial or mining processes. The Gulen final repository for radioactive waste from the oil and gas industry from the Norwegian continental shelf was opened in 2008 and has a capacity of 6000 tonnes. As of 1 January 2011, a new regulation was enforced whereby radioactive waste and radioactive pollution was integrated in the Pollution Control Act from 1981. This means that radioactive waste and radioactive pollution are now regulated under the same legal framework as all other pollutants and hazardous wastes. The regulation establishes two sets of criteria defining radioactive waste: a lower value for when waste is considered to be radioactive waste, and a higher value, in most cases, for when this waste must be disposed of in a final waste repository. For example, waste containing = 1 Bq/g of Ra-226 is defined as radioactive waste, while radioactive waste containing = 10 Bq/g of Ra-226 must be disposed of in a final repository. Radioactive waste between 1 and 10B q/g can be handled and disposed of by waste companies who have a licence for handling hazardous waste according to the Pollution Control Act. Alternatively, they will need a separate licence for handling radioactive waste from the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. The goal of the new regulation is that all radioactive waste should be handled and stored in a safe manner, and discharges should be controlled through a licensing regime in order to avoid/not pose unnecessary risk to humans or the environment. This paper will elaborate on the new regulation of radioactive waste and the principles of NORM management in Norway in view of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's 2007 Recommendations.
PubMed ID
23089033 View in PubMed
Less detail

An inexact two-stage mixed integer linear programming method for solid waste management in the City of Regina.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169398
Source
J Environ Manage. 2006 Nov;81(3):188-209
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Y P Li
G H Huang
Author Affiliation
Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering, University of Regina, Regina, SK, Canada.
Source
J Environ Manage. 2006 Nov;81(3):188-209
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cities
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollution - prevention & control
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Refuse Disposal - standards
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Management - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In this study, an interval-parameter two-stage mixed integer linear programming (ITMILP) model is developed for supporting long-term planning of waste management activities in the City of Regina. In the ITMILP, both two-stage stochastic programming and interval linear programming are introduced into a general mixed integer linear programming framework. Uncertainties expressed as not only probability density functions but also discrete intervals can be reflected. The model can help tackle the dynamic, interactive and uncertain characteristics of the solid waste management system in the City, and can address issues concerning plans for cost-effective waste diversion and landfill prolongation. Three scenarios are considered based on different waste management policies. The results indicate that reasonable solutions have been generated. They are valuable for supporting the adjustment or justification of the existing waste flow allocation patterns, the long-term capacity planning of the City's waste management system, and the formulation of local policies and regulations regarding waste generation and management.
PubMed ID
16678336 View in PubMed
Less detail

An outbreak of infectious hepatitis in two arctic villages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293676
Source
U.S. Arctic Aeromedical Lab., Ladd Air Force Base, Alaska. Tech. note 56-38. 14 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1956
Author
Davis, T.R.A.
Source
U.S. Arctic Aeromedical Lab., Ladd Air Force Base, Alaska. Tech. note 56-38. 14 p.
Date
1956
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Hepatitis
Kotzebue
Kiana
Hepatitis A
HAV
Water supply Waste management
Waste management
Notes
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 821.
Less detail

An outbreak of infectious hepatitis in two arctic villages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature636
Source
New England Journal of Medicine. 1957 May 9; 256(19):881-884.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1957
Author
Davis, T.R.A.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory
Source
New England Journal of Medicine. 1957 May 9; 256(19):881-884.
Date
1957
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Kotzebue
Kiana
Hepatitis A
HAV
Water supply
Waste management
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1918.
Less detail

Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in water environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156839
Source
Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2008 Jun;19(3):260-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Fernando Baquero
José-Luis Martínez
Rafael Cantón
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, CIBER-ESP, Spain. baquero@bitmailer.net
Source
Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2008 Jun;19(3):260-5
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - analysis
Bacteria - drug effects - genetics
Biotechnology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial - genetics
Ecosystem
Gene Transfer, Horizontal
Genes, Bacterial
Humans
Industrial Waste - analysis
Risk assessment
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Waste management
Water Microbiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Antibiotic-resistant organisms enter into water environments from human and animal sources. These bacteria are able to spread their genes into water-indigenous microbes, which also contain resistance genes. On the contrary, many antibiotics from industrial origin circulate in water environments, potentially altering microbial ecosystems. Risk assessment protocols for antibiotics and resistant bacteria in water, based on better systems for antibiotics detection and antibiotic-resistance microbial source tracking, are starting to be discussed. Methods to reduce resistant bacterial load in wastewaters, and the amount of antimicrobial agents, in most cases originated in hospitals and farms, include optimization of disinfection procedures and management of wastewater and manure. A policy for preventing mixing human-originated and animal-originated bacteria with environmental organisms seems advisable.
PubMed ID
18534838 View in PubMed
Less detail

Application of NASA's advanced life support technologies in polar regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4348
Source
Adv Space Res. 1997;20(10):2037-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
D L Bubenheim
C. Lewis
Author Affiliation
NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035-1000, USA.
Source
Adv Space Res. 1997;20(10):2037-44
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Ecological Systems, Closed
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Life Support Systems
Sanitation
Space Simulation
Technology Transfer
United States
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration - trends
Waste Management - methods
Water Purification
Abstract
NASA's advanced life support technologies are being combined with Arctic science and engineering knowledge in the Advanced Life Systems for Extreme Environments (ALSEE) project. This project addresses treatment and reduction of waste, purification and recycling of water, and production of food in remote communities of Alaska. The project focus is a major issue in the state of Alaska and other areas of the Circumpolar North; the health and welfare of people, their lives and the subsistence lifestyle in remote communities, care for the environment, and economic opportunity through technology transfer. The challenge is to implement the technologies in a manner compatible with the social and economic structures of native communities, the state, and the commercial sector. NASA goals are technology selection, system design and methods development of regenerative life support systems for planetary and Lunar bases and other space exploration missions. The ALSEE project will provide similar advanced technologies to address the multiple problems facing the remote communities of Alaska and provide an extreme environment testbed for future space applications. These technologies have never been assembled for this purpose. They offer an integrated approach to solving pressing problems in remote communities.
PubMed ID
11542587 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Approaches of European and Russian legislation in the field of management of medical waste].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264433
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Nov-Dec;93(6):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
N M Samutin
N V Rusakov
N N Butorina
N S Kobzev
A K Ustinov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Nov-Dec;93(6):9-13
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Europe
Humans
Hygiene - legislation & jurisprudence
Medical Waste - legislation & jurisprudence
Refuse Disposal - legislation & jurisprudence
Russia
Waste Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
A comparative analysis of Russian and European legislation concerning to the waste management has been performed. There were revealed principal differences in Russian and European legislation in methodology of the waste classification. In Europe, there is no methodology for breaking up waste into hazard classes, and for the denomination of the danger there are used hazard lists which fail to give information about the extent of their danger. Medical waste in the European legislation are not selected into the separate category as being included in terms of articles and lists in the annexes to the directives or other legal acts. There are considered requirements of the Russian and European legislation in the area of the landfill waste burial. In the frameworks of the proposals for the implementation of international experience in the waste management there was drafted the project of Sanitary rules on hygiene requirements to the arrangement and the contents of landfills for residential solid waste, which includes requirements concerning not only residential solid waste, but also medical waste.
PubMed ID
25950037 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arctic conference exposes far north environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature567
Source
Reprinted from Journal of Environmental Health. 33(2). 6 pp.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970
Author
Conference on Man's Health in a Changing Arctic Environment.
Source
Reprinted from Journal of Environmental Health. 33(2). 6 pp.
Date
1970
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Sanitation
Water supply
Housing
Zoonosis
Climate effects
Waste management
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 786.
Less detail

Areas on which to focus when seeking to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions of commercial waste management. A case study of a hypermarket, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294405
Source
Waste Manag. 2018 Jun; 76:1-18
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
M Hupponen
K Grönman
M Horttanainen
Author Affiliation
Lappeenranta University of Technology, Laboratory of Environmental Technology, P.O. Box 20, FI-53851 Lappeenranta, Finland. Electronic address: mari.hupponen@lut.fi.
Source
Waste Manag. 2018 Jun; 76:1-18
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Finland
Greenhouse Effect
Greenhouse gases
Refuse Disposal
Waste Disposal Facilities
Waste management
Abstract
This study focuses on commercial waste, which has received less attention than household waste in regards to greenhouse gas emission research. First, the global warming potential (GWP) of commercial waste management was calculated. Second, the impacts of different waste fractions and the processes of waste management were recognised. Third, the key areas on which to focus when aiming to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions of commercial waste management were determined. This study was conducted on the waste generated by a real hypermarket in South-East Finland and included eight different waste fractions. The waste treatment plants were selected based on the actual situation. Three different scenarios were employed to evaluate the environmental impact of managing mixed waste: landfilling, combustion and more accurate source separation. The GaBi software and impact assessment methodology CML 2001 were used to perform a life cycle assessment of the environmental impacts associated with the waste management. The results indicated that the total GWP of commercial waste management could be reduced by 93% by directing the mixed waste to combustion instead of landfill. A further 5% GWP reduction could be achieved by more accurate source separation of the mixed waste. Utilisation of energy waste had the most significant influence (41-52%) on the total GWP (-880 to -860?kgCO2-eq./t), followed by landfilling of mixed waste (influence 15-23% on the total GWP, 430?kgCO2-eq./t), recycling polyethylene (PE) plastic (influence 18-21% on the total GWP, -1800?kgCO2-eq./t) and recycling cardboard (influence 11-13% on the total GWP, 51?kgCO2-eq./t). A key focus should be placed on treatment processes and substitutions, especially in terms of substitutions of energy waste and PE plastic. This study also clarified the importance of sorting PE plastic, even though the share of this waste fraction was not substantial. The results of this paper were compared to those of previous studies. The output of this analysis indicated that the total GWP can be significantly reduced by identifying an alternative recycling or incineration location for cardboard where it is used to substitute virgin material or replace fossil fuels respectively. In conclusion, it is essential to note that waste management companies have a notable influence on the emissions of commercial waste management because they choose the places at which the waste fractions are treated and utilised.
PubMed ID
29576513 View in PubMed
Less detail

169 records – page 1 of 17.