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5th Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference and Forum (2012) : "Resilience in a changing world". [Abstract book]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297025
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2012
your chances of success in gardening. It can also keep your garbage from smelling, as many of the noxious smells from a garbage can are produced from discarding compostable items. For municipalities that charge for the disposal of household wastes, composting can also cut your waste disposal
  1 document  
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
3624398
Keywords
Alaska
Fisheries
Marine science
Traditional knowledge
Subsistence
Sustainable energy
Waste disposal
Food security
Ecosystems
Education
Documents
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Accidental exposure to smallpox vaccine, Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197851
Source
Wkly Epidemiol Rec. 2000 Jun 23;75(25):202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-23-2000
Source
Wkly Epidemiol Rec. 2000 Jun 23;75(25):202
Date
Jun-23-2000
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Child
Humans
Medical Waste Disposal
Siberia
Smallpox Vaccine
PubMed ID
10902499 View in PubMed
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Ageing Cattle: The Use of Radiographic Examinations on Cattle Metapodials from Eketorp Ringfort on the Island of Ă–land in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273180
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0137109
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ylva Telldahl
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0137109
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Determination by Skeleton - methods
Agriculture - history - methods
Animal Husbandry - history - methods
Animals
Cattle - growth & development
Cattle Diseases - history - radiography
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - history - radiography - veterinary
Female
History, Ancient
Islands
Male
Meat
Metatarsal Bones - growth & development - radiography
Radiometric Dating
Sex Factors
Sweden
Waste Disposal Facilities
Abstract
In this paper conventional X-ray analysis of cattle metapodials is used to study the age structure of slaughtered cattle at Eketorp ringfort on the island of Öland, Sweden. The X-ray analyses suggest that several animals in both phases were slaughtered aged 4-8 years. More oxen/bulls than cows reached the advanced age of over 8 years, yet in phase III more oxen/bulls seem to have been slaughtered between the ages of 2 and 8 years. These differences may reflect a change in demand for meat related to the character of the site. The results also show a correlation between metapodials with a pathology connected to biomechanical stress and older animals. This suggests that male cattle were used both in meat production and as draught animals. Asymmetry in male metatarsals such as distal broadening of the lateral part of the medial trochlea was visible on the X-ray images. The bone element also indicates a denser outer cortex of the medial diaphysis in comparison to the inner medulla. This could be the result of repetitive mechanical stress. Two metatarsals from cows were documented with distal asymmetry indicating that cows were also used as working animals. Bone elements with changes in the articular surfaces were more common in metapodials from cows with an X-ray age of over 3-4 years. These results highlighted the slaughter age difference between oxen/bulls and cows, enabling a better understanding of animal husbandry and the selection of draught cattle at Eketorp ringfort.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26336086 View in PubMed
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Alternative routes for dissemination of Legionella pneumophila causing three outbreaks in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140041
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Nov 15;44(22):8712-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2010
Author
Jaran Strand Olsen
Tone Aarskaug
Ingjerd Thrane
Christine Pourcel
Eirik Ask
Gisle Johansen
Viggo Waagen
Janet Martha Blatny
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI), Norway.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Nov 15;44(22):8712-7
Date
Nov-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Biodegradation, Environmental
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Legionella pneumophila - classification - growth & development - isolation & purification
Legionnaires' Disease - transmission
Norway - epidemiology
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Water Microbiology
Water Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
Three outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease were reported in the Fredrikstad/Sarpsborg community, Norway, in 2005 and 2008 caused by the L. pneumophila ST15 and ST462 strains determined by sequence based typing. In this retrospective study, we suggest that the aeration ponds, a part of the biological treatment plant at Borregaard Ind. Ltd., are the main amplifiers and primary disseminators of the outbreak L. pneumophila strains. This result is supported by the finding that the ST15 and ST462 strains were not able to survive in air scrubber liquid media more than two days of incubation at the scrubber's operating conditions during the 2005 and 2008 outbreaks. In 2008, >10¹° CFU/L of L. pneumophila ST462 were detected in the aeration ponds. ST15 and ST462 were also detected in the river Glomma in 2005 and 2008, respectively, downstream of the wastewater outlet from the treatment plant (105CFU/L). These findings strongly suggest that the presence of L. pneumophila in the river is due to the release of wastewater from the industrial aeration ponds, demonstrating that the river Glomma may be an additional disseminator of L. pneumophila during the outbreaks. This work emphasizes the need for preventive actions against the release of wastewater containing human pathogens to the environment.
PubMed ID
20949911 View in PubMed
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Amalgam in dentistry. A survey of methods used at dental clinics in Norrbotten to decrease exposure to mercury vapour.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216557
Source
Swed Dent J. 1995;19(1-2):55-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
E C Lönnroth
H. Shahnavaz
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Work Sciences, Luleå University, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1995;19(1-2):55-64
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution, Indoor - prevention & control
Dental Amalgam
Dental Assistants
Dental Hygienists
Dental Waste
Dentistry, Operative
Dentists
Dentists, Women
Environmental Exposure - prevention & control
Equipment Contamination - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Waste Disposal - methods
Middle Aged
Protective Devices - utilization
Questionnaires
Sweden
Ventilation
Abstract
A survey was conducted on the possible factors influencing exposure to mercury vapour during the handling of amalgam and amalgam contaminated products at dental clinics in Norrbotten, the northern part of Sweden, as well as the current methods being used to minimise, if not prevent such exposures. Increased room temperature, a serious problem when working with amalgam, was the most common complaint from the dental personnel reflecting the observation that ventilation in most clinics was far from being satisfactory. However, methods of treating amalgam-contaminated waste products as well as the classification of products as high- or low-risk wastes also differed a lot. The results further showed that although majority of the dental personnel showed concern on the possible hazards of mercury vapour exposure and were interested in having the level of mercury vapour measured in their clinics, very few had access to any protective equipment against it. And among the few who had some forms of protective wear, most found the equipment disturbing and disruptive of work performance.
PubMed ID
7597632 View in PubMed
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Anaerobic co-digestion of acetate-rich with lignin-rich wastewater and the effect of hydrotalcite addition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279741
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2016 Oct;218:84-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Lourdes Rodriguez-Chiang
Jordi Llorca
Olli Dahl
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2016 Oct;218:84-91
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetates - chemistry - metabolism
Aluminum Hydroxide - chemistry
Anaerobiosis
Biodegradation, Environmental
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Finland
Lignin - chemistry - metabolism
Magnesium Hydroxide - chemistry
Methane - biosynthesis
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
The methane potential and biodegradability of different ratios of acetate and lignin-rich effluents from a neutral sulfite semi-chemical (NSSC) pulp mill were investigated. Results showed ultimate methane yields up to 333±5mLCH4/gCOD when only acetate-rich substrate was added and subsequently lower methane potentials of 192±4mLCH4/gCOD when the lignin fraction was increased. The presence of lignin showed a linear decay in methane production, resulting in a 41% decrease in methane when the lignin-rich feed had a 30% increase. A negative linear correlation between lignin content and biodegradability was also observed. Furthermore, the effect of hydrotalcite (HT) addition was evaluated and showed increase in methane potential of up to 8%, a faster production rate and higher soluble lignin removal (7-12% higher). Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies between 64 and 83% were obtained for all samples.
PubMed ID
27347802 View in PubMed
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Analysis and evaluation of methodologies to assess technical urban water systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82834
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2005;52(9):43-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Starkl M.
Brunner N.
Grasser U.
Moog O.
Stagl S.
Kärrman E.
Wimmer J.
Szewieczek R.
Haberl R.
Author Affiliation
Department of Water, Atmosphere and Climate, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Muthgasse 18, 1190 Vienna, Austria. markus.starkl@boku.ac.at
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2005;52(9):43-51
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Austria
Cities
Conservation of Natural Resources - economics - methods
Data Collection
Decision Making
Public Policy
Waste Disposal, Fluid - economics - methods
Water supply
Abstract
The paper reports on the methodology and findings of a recent project on behalf of the Austrian Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management. The Ministry is seeking procedures for combining ecological and economic criteria to assess which technical urban water alternatives shall receive funding. To this end the current decision making process (DMP) for implementing urban water alternatives in Austria has been analyzed and compared with the situation elsewhere, e.g. in Sweden. The DMP entails specific requirements on assessment, whence the most common decision aid methodologies, ranging from LCA-based to multi-criteria methods, have been described and evaluated from an environmental, economic, legal and practical point of view, turning out recommendations to the Ministry. Their main points are: First the DMP should be kept as simple as possible in order to make it transparent. Second the aggregation of different criteria groups should and can be avoided. Therefore the stakeholders should not be allowed to make trade-offs. Finally clear objectives need to be stated.
PubMed ID
16445172 View in PubMed
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An inexact two-stage mixed integer linear programming method for solid waste management in the City of Regina.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169398
Source
J Environ Manage. 2006 Nov;81(3):188-209
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Y P Li
G H Huang
Author Affiliation
Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering, University of Regina, Regina, SK, Canada.
Source
J Environ Manage. 2006 Nov;81(3):188-209
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cities
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollution - prevention & control
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Refuse Disposal - standards
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Management - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In this study, an interval-parameter two-stage mixed integer linear programming (ITMILP) model is developed for supporting long-term planning of waste management activities in the City of Regina. In the ITMILP, both two-stage stochastic programming and interval linear programming are introduced into a general mixed integer linear programming framework. Uncertainties expressed as not only probability density functions but also discrete intervals can be reflected. The model can help tackle the dynamic, interactive and uncertain characteristics of the solid waste management system in the City, and can address issues concerning plans for cost-effective waste diversion and landfill prolongation. Three scenarios are considered based on different waste management policies. The results indicate that reasonable solutions have been generated. They are valuable for supporting the adjustment or justification of the existing waste flow allocation patterns, the long-term capacity planning of the City's waste management system, and the formulation of local policies and regulations regarding waste generation and management.
PubMed ID
16678336 View in PubMed
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[A photometric method of analysis of cyanides].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227340
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(12):41-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A A Beliakov
L V Mel'nikova
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(12):41-2
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hand Disinfection
Humans
Industrial Waste - analysis
Occupational Medicine - methods
Photometry - methods
Potassium Cyanide - analysis
Protective Clothing
Russia
Skin
Sodium Cyanide - analysis
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The contributors propose a selective photometric technique for detection of sodium and potassium cyanides in different washings, sewage, overalls extraction. The technique was based on the formation of a polymetyne dye, and barbituric acid and pyridine reactions. It proved efficient in detecting the cyanides within 0.01-0.054 mg/dm3, 1-100 mg/l, 0.08-1.24 mg/dm3 with deviations not exceeding 23%. Duration of the test was limited to 25-30 min.
PubMed ID
1840109 View in PubMed
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242 records – page 1 of 25.