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The activated sludge ecosystem contains a core community of abundant organisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275609
Source
ISME J. 2016 Jan;10(1):11-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Aaron M Saunders
Mads Albertsen
Jes Vollertsen
Per H Nielsen
Source
ISME J. 2016 Jan;10(1):11-20
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Denmark
Ecosystem
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sewage - microbiology
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
Understanding the microbial ecology of a system requires that the observed population dynamics can be linked to their metabolic functions. However, functional characterization is laborious and the choice of organisms should be prioritized to those that are frequently abundant (core) or transiently abundant, which are therefore putatively make the greatest contribution to carbon turnover in the system. We analyzed the microbial communities in 13 Danish wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal in consecutive years and a single plant periodically over 6 years, using Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons of the V4 region. The plants contained a core community of 63 abundant genus-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that made up 68% of the total reads. A core community consisting of abundant OTUs was also observed within the incoming wastewater to three plants. The net growth rate for individual OTUs was quantified using mass balance, and it was found that 10% of the total reads in the activated sludge were from slow or non-growing OTUs, and that their measured abundance was primarily because of immigration with the wastewater. Transiently abundant organisms were also identified. Among them the genus Nitrotoga (class Betaproteobacteria) was the most abundant putative nitrite oxidizer in a number of activated sludge plants, which challenges previous assumptions that Nitrospira (phylum Nitrospirae) are the primary nitrite-oxidizers in activated sludge systems with nutrient removal.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26262816 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater treatment systems and receiving waters in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294222
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Nov 15; 598:1085-1094
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-15-2017
Author
Kara D Neudorf
Yan Nan Huang
Colin M Ragush
Christopher K Yost
Rob C Jamieson
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Process Engineering and Applied Science, Dalhousie University, 1360 Barrington Street, Halifax B3H 4R2, Canada.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Nov 15; 598:1085-1094
Date
Nov-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Drug Resistance, Bacterial - genetics
Environmental monitoring
Genes, Bacterial
Nunavut
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
Domestic wastewater discharges may adversely impact arctic ecosystems and local indigenous people, who rely on being able to hunt and harvest food from their local environment. Therefore, there is a need to develop efficient wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), which can be operated in remote communities under extreme climatic conditions. WWTPs have been identified as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). The objective of this work was to quantify the presence of nine different ARG markers (int1, sul1, sul2, tet(O), erm(B), mecA, blaCTX-M, blaTEM, and qnr(S)) in two passive systems (waste stabilization ponds [WSPs]) and one mechanical filtration plant operating in two smaller and one large community, respectively, in Nunavut, Canada. Measurement of water quality parameters (carbonaceous oxygen demand, ammonia, total suspended solids, Escherichia coli and total coliforms) showed that the WWTPs provided only primary treatment. Low levels of the ARGs (2logcopies/mL) were observed in the effluent, demonstrating that bacteria residing in three northern WWTPs harbour ARGs conferring resistance to multiple clinically-relevant classes of antibiotics. Our results indicate that long-term storage in WSPs benefitted removal of organic material and some ARGs. However, one WSP system showed evidence of the enrichment of sul1, sul2, mecA, tet(O) and qnr(S). Further research is needed to fully understand if these ARG releases pose a risk to human health, especially in the context of traditional hunting and fishing activities.
PubMed ID
28482456 View in PubMed
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Assessing microbial contamination and antibiotic resistant bacteria using zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296517
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Feb 10; 650(Pt 2):2141-2149
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-10-2019
Author
Maria Alexandra Bighiu
Anna Norman Haldén
Willem Goedkoop
Jakob Ottoson
Author Affiliation
Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Sweden. Electronic address: maria.bighiu@slu.se.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Feb 10; 650(Pt 2):2141-2149
Date
Feb-10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Dreissena - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Enterococcus - drug effects - isolation & purification
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Escherichia coli - drug effects - isolation & purification
Lakes - microbiology
Sweden
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
Aquatic pollution with faecal bacteria and subsequent consumption of contaminated water or food is a worldwide issue that causes severe health effects (e.g. meningitis, salmonellosis, dysentery). In addition, the excessive use of antibiotics in animal husbandry and human medicine has enhanced the selective pressure on pathogenic bacteria, further increasing human health risks and detrimental effects on natural microbial communities. This urges the need to monitor faecal contamination using a time-integrated approach, as grab water samples can miss pathogen peaks. We tested the ability of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) to take up and depurate faecal indicator bacteria such as Escherichia coli and intestinal enterococci. Furthermore, we quantified the frequency of antibiotic resistant bacteria in water and mussels both in controlled laboratory tests and under in situ conditions downstream of a sewage treatment plant (STP). Laboratory results show that bacterial indicators in mussels were 132 times higher than their concentration in water, and that mussels retained bacteria up to 2?days after pulse exposure. Field results show decreasing bacterial concentrations in both water and mussels downstream the STP, with maximum E. coli concentrations ranging 173-9?cfu?mL-1 in water and 2970-330?cfu?g-1 in mussels. Similarly, enterococci ranged 59-4?cfu?mL-1 and 1450-240?cfu?g-1 in water and mussels, respectively. High proportions of antibiotic resistant E. coli were found in mussels (72%) and water (65%), and slightly lower proportion of resistant enterococci was found in mussels (47%) and in water (34%). Moreover, 33% of the bacteria isolated from mussels were resistant to multiple antibiotics, which emphasizes that resistance is a common feature in surface waters and highlights the need for safe water management. Our results show that zebra mussels provide an efficient, time-integrating tool for quantifying faecal indicators, including resistant and multidrug resistant bacteria.
PubMed ID
30290355 View in PubMed
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Co-digestion of cultivated microalgae and sewage sludge from municipal waste water treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263567
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2014 Nov;171:203-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Jesper Olsson
Xin Mei Feng
Johnny Ascue
Francesco G Gentili
M A Shabiimam
Emma Nehrenheim
Eva Thorin
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2014 Nov;171:203-10
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Biofuels
Lakes - microbiology
Methane - biosynthesis
Microalgae - metabolism
Sewage - microbiology
Sweden
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
In this study two wet microalgae cultures and one dried microalgae culture were co-digested in different proportions with sewage sludge in mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The aim was to evaluate if the co-digestion could lead to an increased efficiency of methane production compared to digestion of sewage sludge alone. The results showed that co-digestion with both wet and dried microalgae, in certain proportions, increased the biochemical methane potential (BMP) compared with digestion of sewage sludge alone in mesophilic conditions. The BMP was significantly higher than the calculated BMP in many of the mixtures. This synergetic effect was statistically significant in a mixture containing 63% (w/w VS based) undigested sewage sludge and 37% (w/w VS based) wet algae slurry, which produced 23% more methane than observed with undigested sewage sludge alone. The trend was that thermophilic co-digestion of microalgae and undigested sewage sludge did not give the same synergy.
PubMed ID
25203227 View in PubMed
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A comparison of extended spectrum ß-lactamase producing Escherichia coli from clinical, recreational water and wastewater samples associated in time and location.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286839
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(10):e0186576
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Silje B Jørgensen
Arne V Søraas
Lotte S Arnesen
Truls M Leegaard
Arnfinn Sundsfjord
Pål A Jenum
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(10):e0186576
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bathing Beaches
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Epidemiological Monitoring
Escherichia coli - drug effects - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Fresh Water - microbiology
Gene Expression
Genome, Bacterial
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Norway - epidemiology
Recreation
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Waste Water - microbiology
Water Microbiology
beta-Lactamases - genetics
Abstract
Extended spectrum ß-lactamase producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) are excreted via effluents and sewage into the environment where they can re-contaminate humans and animals. The aim of this observational study was to detect and quantify ESBL-EC in recreational water and wastewater, and perform a genetic and phenotypic comparative analysis of the environmental strains with geographically associated human urinary ESBL-EC. Recreational fresh- and saltwater samples from four different beaches and wastewater samples from a nearby sewage plant were filtered and cultured on differential and ESBL-selective media. After antimicrobial susceptibility testing and multi-locus variable number of tandem repeats assay (MLVA), selected ESBL-EC strains from recreational water were characterized by whole genome sequencing (WGS) and compared to wastewater and human urine isolates from people living in the same area. We detected ESBL-EC in recreational water samples on 8/20 occasions (40%), representing all sites. The ratio of ESBL-EC to total number of E. coli colony forming units varied from 0 to 3.8%. ESBL-EC were present in all wastewater samples in ratios of 0.56-0.75%. ST131 was most prevalent in urine and wastewater samples, while ST10 dominated in water samples. Eight STs and identical ESBL-EC MLVA-types were detected in all compartments. Clinical ESBL-EC isolates were more likely to be multidrug-resistant (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
29040337 View in PubMed
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Detection of Legionella by cultivation and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in biological waste water treatment plants in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258254
Source
J Water Health. 2014 Sep;12(3):543-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Vidar Lund
Wenche Fonahn
Jens Erik Pettersen
Dominique A Caugant
Eirik Ask
Ase Nysaeter
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food, Water and Cosmetics, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway E-mail: vidar.lund@fhi.no.
Source
J Water Health. 2014 Sep;12(3):543-54
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colony Count, Microbial
Legionella - genetics - isolation & purification
Norway
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Waste Water - microbiology
Water Purification
Abstract
Cases of Legionnaires' disease associated with biological treatment plants (BTPs) have been reported in six countries between 1997 and 2010. However, knowledge about the occurrence of Legionella in BTPs is scarce. Hence, we undertook a qualitative and quantitative screening for Legionella in BTPs treating waste water from municipalities and industries in Norway, to assess the transmission potential of Legionella from these installations. Thirty-three plants from different industries were sampled four times within 1 year. By cultivation, 21 (16%) of 130 analyses were positive for Legionella species and 12 (9%) of 130 analyses were positive for Legionella pneumophila. By quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 433 (99%) of 437 analyses were positive for Legionella species and 218 (46%) of 470 analyses were positive for L. pneumophila. This survey indicates that PCR could be the preferable method for detection of Legionella in samples from BTPs. Sequence types of L. pneumophila associated with outbreaks in Norway were not identified from the BTPs. We showed that a waste water treatment plant with an aeration basin can produce high concentrations of Legionella. Therefore, these plants should be considered as a possible source of community-acquired Legionella infections.
PubMed ID
25252358 View in PubMed
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Disinfection and removal of human pathogenic bacteria in arctic waste stabilization ponds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297766
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32881-32893
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Yannan Huang
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Colin M Ragush
Rob C Jamieson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Water Resources Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32881-32893
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bacteria
Disinfection - methods
Environmental Biomarkers
Escherichia coli
Feces - microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes
Nunavut
Ponds - microbiology
Salmonella
Seasons
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - microbiology
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Wastewater stabilization ponds (WSPs) are commonly used to treat municipal wastewater in Arctic Canada. The biological treatment in the WSPs is strongly influenced by climatic conditions. Currently, there is limited information about the removal of fecal and pathogenic bacteria during the short cool summer treatment season. With relevance to public health, the objectives of this paper were to determine if treatment in arctic WSPs resulted in the disinfection (i.e., removal of fecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli) and removal of selected human bacterial pathogens from the treated effluent. The treatment performance, with focus on microbial removal, was assessed for the one-cell WSP in Pond Inlet (Nunavut [NU]) and two-cell WSP in Clyde River (NU) over three consecutive (2012-2014) summer treatment seasons (late June-early September). The WSPs provided a primary disinfection treatment of the wastewater with a 2-3 Log removal of generic indicator E. coli. The bacterial pathogens Salmonella spp., pathogenic E. coli, and Listeria monocytogenes, but not Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter pylori, were detected in the untreated and treated wastewater, indicating that human pathogens were not reliably removed. Seasonal and annual variations in temperature significantly (p 
PubMed ID
28353112 View in PubMed
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Draft genome sequence of the first acid-tolerant sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacterium Desulfovibrio sp. TomC having potential for minewater treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267768
Source
FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2015 Feb;362(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Olga V Karnachuk
Andrey V Mardanov
Marat R Avakyan
Vitaly V Kadnikov
Maria Vlasova
Alexey V Beletsky
Anna L Gerasimchuk
Nikolai V Ravin
Source
FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2015 Feb;362(4)
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acids
Base Sequence
Biodegradation, Environmental
Bioreactors
DNA, Bacterial
Desulfovibrio - genetics - metabolism
Genome, Bacterial
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Metals
Molecular Sequence Data
Oxidation-Reduction
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
Siberia
Sulfates - metabolism
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
The sulfidogenic bacterium Desulfovibrio sp. TomC was isolated from acidic waste at the abandoned gold ore mining site in the Martaiga gold ore belt, Western Siberia. This bacterium, being the first reported acid-tolerant gram-negative sulfate-reducer of the order Deltaproteobacteria, is able to grow at pH as low as 2.5 and is resistant to high concentrations of metals. The draft 5.3 Mb genome sequence of Desulfovibrio sp. TomC has been established and provides the genetic basis for application of this microorganism in bioreactors and other bioremediation schemes for the treatment of metal-containing wastewater.
PubMed ID
25724779 View in PubMed
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Fate of antibiotic resistance genes in two Arctic tundra wetlands impacted by municipal wastewater.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299000
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Nov 15; 642:1415-1428
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-15-2018
Author
Jennifer L Hayward
Amy J Jackson
Christopher K Yost
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Rob C Jamieson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Water Resources Studies, Department of Civil & Resource Engineering, Dalhousie University, 1360 Barrington St., Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2, Canada. Electronic address: jenny.hayward@dal.ca.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Nov 15; 642:1415-1428
Date
Nov-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Canada
Drug Resistance, Microbial - genetics
Environmental monitoring
Genes, Bacterial
Nunavut
Tundra
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Waste Water - microbiology
Wetlands
Abstract
In the Canadian Arctic, it is common practice to discharge municipal wastewater into tundra wetlands. Antibiotic resistant bacteria and the antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) they contain can be present in municipal wastewater and there is a scarcity of knowledge on ARGs in wastewater in Arctic environments. This study was initiated on the fate of ARGs in tundra wetland ecosystems impacted by anthropogenic wastewater sources in Arctic communities. In the summer season of 2016, two wetlands were studied in the Inuit communities of Sanikiluaq and Naujaat in Nunavut, Canada. Genomic DNA was extracted from both soil and water during the spring freshet and late summer in the wetlands, and a suite of nine clinically relevant ARGs (sul1, sul2, mecA, vanA, qnrS, ermB, tetO, blaTEM, blaCTX-M), and an integron gene (int1) were analyzed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Hydrological and water quality measurements were conducted in conjunction with the microbiological sampling. Gene targets were consistently present in the wastewater, and throughout both wetlands, except for vanA and mecA. Concentrations of ARGs were greater during the spring freshet, due to short hydraulic retention times (
PubMed ID
30045522 View in PubMed
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Human health implications of clinically relevant bacteria in wastewater habitats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115433
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2013 Jun;20(6):3550-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Ana Rita Varela
Célia M Manaia
Author Affiliation
CBQF - Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina - Laboratório Associado, Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa/Porto, Rua Dr. António Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072, Porto, Portugal.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2013 Jun;20(6):3550-69
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - analysis
Bacteria - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Biodiversity
Disinfectants - analysis
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Genes, Bacterial
Humans
Lakes
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Rivers
Virulence
Waste Water - microbiology
Water Microbiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The objective of this review is to reflect on the multiple roles of bacteria in wastewater habitats with particular emphasis on their harmful potential for human health. Indigenous bacteria promote a series of biochemical and metabolic transformations indispensable to achieve wastewater treatment. Some of these bacteria may be pathogenic or harbour antibiotic resistance or virulence genes harmful for human health. Several chemical contaminants (heavy metals, disinfectants and antibiotics) may select these bacteria or their genes. Worldwide studies show that treated wastewater contain antibiotic resistant bacteria or genes encoding virulence or antimicrobial resistance, evidencing that treatment processes may fail to remove efficiently these bio-pollutants. The contamination of the surrounding environment, such as rivers or lakes receiving such effluents, is also documented in several studies. The current state of the art suggests that only some of antibiotic resistance and virulence potential in wastewater is known. Moreover, wastewater habitats may favour the evolution and dissemination of new resistance and virulence genes and the emergence of new pathogens. For these reasons, additional research is needed in order to obtain a more detailed assessment of the long-term effects of wastewater discharges. In particular, it is important to measure the human and environmental health risks associated with wastewater reuse.
PubMed ID
23508533 View in PubMed
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22 records – page 1 of 3.