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154 records – page 1 of 16.

Alternative routes for dissemination of Legionella pneumophila causing three outbreaks in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140041
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Nov 15;44(22):8712-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2010
Author
Jaran Strand Olsen
Tone Aarskaug
Ingjerd Thrane
Christine Pourcel
Eirik Ask
Gisle Johansen
Viggo Waagen
Janet Martha Blatny
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI), Norway.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Nov 15;44(22):8712-7
Date
Nov-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Biodegradation, Environmental
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Legionella pneumophila - classification - growth & development - isolation & purification
Legionnaires' Disease - transmission
Norway - epidemiology
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Water Microbiology
Water Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
Three outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease were reported in the Fredrikstad/Sarpsborg community, Norway, in 2005 and 2008 caused by the L. pneumophila ST15 and ST462 strains determined by sequence based typing. In this retrospective study, we suggest that the aeration ponds, a part of the biological treatment plant at Borregaard Ind. Ltd., are the main amplifiers and primary disseminators of the outbreak L. pneumophila strains. This result is supported by the finding that the ST15 and ST462 strains were not able to survive in air scrubber liquid media more than two days of incubation at the scrubber's operating conditions during the 2005 and 2008 outbreaks. In 2008, >10¹° CFU/L of L. pneumophila ST462 were detected in the aeration ponds. ST15 and ST462 were also detected in the river Glomma in 2005 and 2008, respectively, downstream of the wastewater outlet from the treatment plant (105CFU/L). These findings strongly suggest that the presence of L. pneumophila in the river is due to the release of wastewater from the industrial aeration ponds, demonstrating that the river Glomma may be an additional disseminator of L. pneumophila during the outbreaks. This work emphasizes the need for preventive actions against the release of wastewater containing human pathogens to the environment.
PubMed ID
20949911 View in PubMed
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Anaerobic co-digestion of acetate-rich with lignin-rich wastewater and the effect of hydrotalcite addition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279741
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2016 Oct;218:84-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Lourdes Rodriguez-Chiang
Jordi Llorca
Olli Dahl
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2016 Oct;218:84-91
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetates - chemistry - metabolism
Aluminum Hydroxide - chemistry
Anaerobiosis
Biodegradation, Environmental
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Finland
Lignin - chemistry - metabolism
Magnesium Hydroxide - chemistry
Methane - biosynthesis
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
The methane potential and biodegradability of different ratios of acetate and lignin-rich effluents from a neutral sulfite semi-chemical (NSSC) pulp mill were investigated. Results showed ultimate methane yields up to 333±5mLCH4/gCOD when only acetate-rich substrate was added and subsequently lower methane potentials of 192±4mLCH4/gCOD when the lignin fraction was increased. The presence of lignin showed a linear decay in methane production, resulting in a 41% decrease in methane when the lignin-rich feed had a 30% increase. A negative linear correlation between lignin content and biodegradability was also observed. Furthermore, the effect of hydrotalcite (HT) addition was evaluated and showed increase in methane potential of up to 8%, a faster production rate and higher soluble lignin removal (7-12% higher). Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies between 64 and 83% were obtained for all samples.
PubMed ID
27347802 View in PubMed
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Analysis and evaluation of methodologies to assess technical urban water systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82834
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2005;52(9):43-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Starkl M.
Brunner N.
Grasser U.
Moog O.
Stagl S.
Kärrman E.
Wimmer J.
Szewieczek R.
Haberl R.
Author Affiliation
Department of Water, Atmosphere and Climate, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Muthgasse 18, 1190 Vienna, Austria. markus.starkl@boku.ac.at
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2005;52(9):43-51
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Austria
Cities
Conservation of Natural Resources - economics - methods
Data Collection
Decision Making
Public Policy
Waste Disposal, Fluid - economics - methods
Water supply
Abstract
The paper reports on the methodology and findings of a recent project on behalf of the Austrian Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management. The Ministry is seeking procedures for combining ecological and economic criteria to assess which technical urban water alternatives shall receive funding. To this end the current decision making process (DMP) for implementing urban water alternatives in Austria has been analyzed and compared with the situation elsewhere, e.g. in Sweden. The DMP entails specific requirements on assessment, whence the most common decision aid methodologies, ranging from LCA-based to multi-criteria methods, have been described and evaluated from an environmental, economic, legal and practical point of view, turning out recommendations to the Ministry. Their main points are: First the DMP should be kept as simple as possible in order to make it transparent. Second the aggregation of different criteria groups should and can be avoided. Therefore the stakeholders should not be allowed to make trade-offs. Finally clear objectives need to be stated.
PubMed ID
16445172 View in PubMed
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An inexact two-stage mixed integer linear programming method for solid waste management in the City of Regina.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169398
Source
J Environ Manage. 2006 Nov;81(3):188-209
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Y P Li
G H Huang
Author Affiliation
Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering, University of Regina, Regina, SK, Canada.
Source
J Environ Manage. 2006 Nov;81(3):188-209
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cities
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollution - prevention & control
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Refuse Disposal - standards
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Management - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In this study, an interval-parameter two-stage mixed integer linear programming (ITMILP) model is developed for supporting long-term planning of waste management activities in the City of Regina. In the ITMILP, both two-stage stochastic programming and interval linear programming are introduced into a general mixed integer linear programming framework. Uncertainties expressed as not only probability density functions but also discrete intervals can be reflected. The model can help tackle the dynamic, interactive and uncertain characteristics of the solid waste management system in the City, and can address issues concerning plans for cost-effective waste diversion and landfill prolongation. Three scenarios are considered based on different waste management policies. The results indicate that reasonable solutions have been generated. They are valuable for supporting the adjustment or justification of the existing waste flow allocation patterns, the long-term capacity planning of the City's waste management system, and the formulation of local policies and regulations regarding waste generation and management.
PubMed ID
16678336 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic residues in final effluents of European wastewater treatment plants and their impact on the aquatic environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306091
Source
Environ Int. 2020 07; 140:105733
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2020
Author
Sara Rodriguez-Mozaz
Ivone Vaz-Moreira
Saulo Varela Della Giustina
Marta Llorca
Damià Barceló
Sara Schubert
Thomas U Berendonk
Irene Michael-Kordatou
Despo Fatta-Kassinos
Jose Luis Martinez
Christian Elpers
Isabel Henriques
Thomas Jaeger
Thomas Schwartz
Erik Paulshus
Kristin O'Sullivan
Katariina M M Pärnänen
Marko Virta
Thi Thuy Do
Fiona Walsh
Célia M Manaia
Author Affiliation
Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), Emili Grahit 101, 17003 Girona, Spain; Universitat de Girona, Girona, Spain. Electronic address: srodriguez@icra.cat.
Source
Environ Int. 2020 07; 140:105733
Date
07-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Europe
Finland
Germany
Ireland
Norway
Portugal
Spain
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Waste Water
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Purification
Abstract
A comprehensive monitoring of a broad set of antibiotics in the final effluent of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) of 7 European countries (Portugal, Spain, Ireland, Cyprus, Germany, Finland, and Norway) was carried out in two consecutive years (2015 and 2016). This is the first study of this kind performed at an international level. Within the 53 antibiotics monitored 17 were detected at least once in the final effluent of the WWTPs, i.e.: ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, enrofloxacin, orbifloxacin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, sulfapyridine, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, nalidixic acid, pipemidic acid, oxolinic acid, cefalexin, clindamycin, metronidazole, ampicillin, and tetracycline. The countries exhibiting the highest effluent average concentrations of antibiotics were Ireland and the southern countries Portugal and Spain, whereas the northern countries (Norway, Finland and Germany) and Cyprus exhibited lower total concentration. The antibiotic occurrence data in the final effluents were used for the assessment of their impact on the aquatic environment. Both, environmental predicted no effect concentration (PNEC-ENVs) and the PNECs based on minimal inhibitory concentrations (PNEC-MICs) were considered for the evaluation of the impact on microbial communities in aquatic systems and on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, respectively. Based on this analysis, three compounds, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin and cefalexin are proposed as markers of antibiotic pollution, as they could occasionally pose a risk to the environment. Integrated studies like this are crucial to map the impact of antibiotic pollution and to provide the basis for designing water quality and environmental risk in regular water monitoring programs.
PubMed ID
32353669 View in PubMed
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[A photometric method of analysis of cyanides].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227340
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(12):41-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A A Beliakov
L V Mel'nikova
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(12):41-2
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hand Disinfection
Humans
Industrial Waste - analysis
Occupational Medicine - methods
Photometry - methods
Potassium Cyanide - analysis
Protective Clothing
Russia
Skin
Sodium Cyanide - analysis
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The contributors propose a selective photometric technique for detection of sodium and potassium cyanides in different washings, sewage, overalls extraction. The technique was based on the formation of a polymetyne dye, and barbituric acid and pyridine reactions. It proved efficient in detecting the cyanides within 0.01-0.054 mg/dm3, 1-100 mg/l, 0.08-1.24 mg/dm3 with deviations not exceeding 23%. Duration of the test was limited to 25-30 min.
PubMed ID
1840109 View in PubMed
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Applicability of energy-positive net-zero water management in Alaska: technology status and case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297642
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):33025-33037
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Tingting Wu
James D Englehardt
Tianjiao Guo
Lucien Gassie
Aaron Dotson
Author Affiliation
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 5000 Technology Drive, Huntsville, AL, 35899, USA. Tingting.Wu@uah.edu.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):33025-33037
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Cities
Drinking Water
Humans
Population Density
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid - economics - methods
Water Purification - economics - methods
Water Supply - economics
Abstract
Challenges of water and wastewater management in Alaska include the potential need for above-grade and freeze-protected piping, high unit energy costs and, in many rural areas, low population density and median annual income. However, recently developed net-zero water (NZW), i.e., nearly closed-loop, direct potable water reuse systems, can retain the thermal energy in municipal wastewater, producing warm treated potable water without the need for substantial water re-heating, heat pumping or transfer, or additional energy conversion. Consequently, these systems are projected to be capable of saving more energy than they use in water treatment and conveyance, in the temperate USA. In this paper, NZW technology is reviewed in terms of potential applicability in Alaska by performing a hypothetical case study for the city of Fairbanks, Alaska. Results of this paper study indicate that in municipalities of Alaska with local engineering and road access, the use of NZW systems may provide an energy-efficient water service option. In particular, case study modeling suggests hot water energy savings are equivalent to five times the energy used for treatment, much greater savings than in mid-latitudes, due largely to the substantially higher energy needed for heating water from a conventional treatment system and lack of need for freeze-protected piping. Further study of the applicability of NZW technology in cold regions, with expanded evaluation in terms of system-wide lifecycle cost, is recommended.
PubMed ID
29168139 View in PubMed
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[Are physicians responsible for the environment?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49350
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Apr 4;87(14):1138, 1140
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-4-1990
Author
O. Edhag
Author Affiliation
Verksledningen, Socialstyrelsen, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Apr 4;87(14):1138, 1140
Date
Apr-4-1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental health
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollution - prevention & control
Medical Waste
Physicians
Refuse Disposal
Sweden
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Waste Products
PubMed ID
2319866 View in PubMed
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Assessing the impacts of changes in treatment technology on energy and greenhouse gas balances for organic waste and wastewater treatment using historical data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98881
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2009 Nov;27(9):861-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Tjalfe G Poulsen
Jens Aage Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. tgp@bio.aau.dk
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2009 Nov;27(9):861-70
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Cities
Denmark
Global warming
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Waste Management - methods - statistics & numerical data
Waste Products - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Historical data on organic waste and wastewater treatment during the period of 1970-2020 were used to assess the impact of treatment on energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) balances. The assessment included the waste fractions: Sewage sludge, food waste, yard waste and other organic waste (paper, plastic, etc.). Data were collected from Aalborg, a municipality located in Northern Denmark. During the period from 1970-2005, Aalborg Municipality has changed its waste treatment strategy from landfilling of all wastes toward composting of yard waste and incineration with combined heat and power production from the remaining organic municipal waste. Wastewater treatment has changed from direct discharge of untreated wastewater to full organic matter and nutrient (N, P) removal combined with anaerobic digestion of the sludge for biogas production with power and heat generation. These changes in treatment technology have resulted in the waste and wastewater treatment systems in Aalborg progressing from being net consumers of energy and net emitters of GHG, to becoming net producers of energy and net savers of GHG emissions (due to substitution of fossil fuels elsewhere). If it is assumed that the organic waste quantity and composition is the same in 1970 and 2005, the technology change over this time period has resulted in a progression from a net annual GHG emission of 200 kg CO( 2)-eq. capita(-1) in 1970 to a net saving of 170 kg CO(2)-eq. capita(-1) in 2005 for management of urban organic wastes.
PubMed ID
19767326 View in PubMed
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[ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL RISK FOR CONTAMINATION OF SURFACE WATER RESERVOIRS BY PATHOGENS OF HUMAN PARASITIC DISEASES].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265357
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2015 Apr-Jun;(2):3-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
E P Khromenkova
L L Dimidova
O S Dumbadze
G T Aidinov
G L Shendo
A Kh Agirov
Kh Kh Batchaev
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2015 Apr-Jun;(2):3-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Fresh Water - parasitology
Humans
Parasitic Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Russia - epidemiology
Sewage - parasitology
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Water Purification
Abstract
Sanitary and parasitological studies of the waste effluents and surface reservoir waters were conducted in the south of Russia. The efficiency of purification of waste effluents from the pathogens of parasitic diseases was investigated in the region's sewage-purification facilities. The water of the surface water reservoirs was found to contain helminthic eggs and larvae and intestinal protozoan cysts because of the poor purification and disinfection of service fecal sewage waters. The poor purification and disinvasion of waste effluents in the region determine the potential risk of contamination of the surface water reservoirs and infection of the population with the pathogens of human parasitic diseases.
PubMed ID
26152029 View in PubMed
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154 records – page 1 of 16.