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Asthma and bronchiolitis hospitalizations among American Indian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3827
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2000 Oct;154(10):991-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
L L Liu
J W Stout
M. Sullivan
D. Solet
D K Shay
D C Grossman
Author Affiliation
Child Health Institute, 146 N Canal St, Suite 300, Seattle, WA 98103-8652, USA.
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2000 Oct;154(10):991-6
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Asthma - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Bronchiolitis - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare asthma and bronchiolitis hospitalization rates in American Indian and Alaskan native (AI/AN) children and all children in Washington State. METHODS: A retrospective data analysis using Washington State hospitalization data for 1987 through 1996. Patients were included if asthma or bronchiolitis was the first-listed diagnosis. American Indian and Alaskan native children were identified by linking state hospitalization data with Indian Health Service enrollment data. RESULTS: Similar rates of asthma hospitalization were found for AI/AN children older than 1 year compared with all children. In AI/AN children younger than 1 year, hospitalization rates for asthma (528 per 100,000 population; 95% confidence interval [CI], 346-761) and bronchiolitis (2954 per 100,000 population; 95% CI, 2501-3456) were 2 to 3 times higher than the rates in all children (232 per 100,000 population [95% CI, 215-251] and 1190 per 100,000 population [95% CI, 1149-1232], respectively). Hospitalization rates for asthma and bronchiolitis increased 50% between 1987 and 1996 for all children younger than 1 year and almost doubled for AI/AN children younger than 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: American Indian and Alaskan native children have significantly higher rates of hospitalization for wheezing illnesses during the first year of life compared with children of other age groups and races. Furthermore, the disparities in rates have increased significantly over time. Future public health measures directed at managing asthma and bronchiolitis should target AI/AN infants.
PubMed ID
11030850 View in PubMed
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Colorectal cancer incidence and survival among Alaska Natives, 1969-1993.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4010
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1998 Jun;27(3):388-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
M O Brown
A P Lanier
T M Becker
Author Affiliation
University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, USA.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1998 Jun;27(3):388-96
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - ethnology - mortality
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Survival Rate
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although colorectal cancer rates are low among most groups of Native Americans in North America, rates for Alaska Natives have been substantially elevated compared with US rates for all races combined. METHODS: To better describe the epidemiology of colorectal cancer incidence and survival among Alaska Natives, stratified by gender and tribal/ethnic affiliation, we examined data collected by the Alaska Native Cancer Registry 1969-1993. We calculated age-adjusted and age-specific incidence as well as actuarial survival rates, and examined histological type, site, stage at diagnosis, and treatment. We compared these data to colorectal cancer data from whites living in western Washington. RESULTS: In all, 587 colorectal cancer cases were identified among Alaska Natives over the 25-year period, for an age-adjusted annual incidence rate of 71.4/100000 in women, and 69.3/100000 in men. Compared to Alaska Indians, colon cancer rates were significantly higher in Aleuts (relative risk [RR] = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.2-2.2) and in Eskimos (RR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2-1.8), while rectal cancer rates did not differ by race/ethnicity. Alaska Natives experienced a 50% higher incidence rate of colorectal cancer overall compared to western Washington whites (RR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.3-1.6), although rectal cancer rates were similar in the two populations. The highest RR were seen among Alaska Native women; Aleuts and Eskimos had colon cancer rates more than twice that of western Washington white women. No unusual qualitative features were found in the cancers occurring in Alaska Natives. Actuarial colorectal cancer survival rates for Alaska Natives overall were 74% at one year and 42% at 5 years; these rates were very similar to those observed for the western Washington population. Both one and 5-year survival rates showed a significant trend towards improvement over time. CONCLUSIONS: Alaska Natives had substantially higher colorectal cancer incidence rates compared to western Washington whites. Rates were particularly high for Aleut and Eskimo women. These data suggest a need for intensified secondary prevention strategies for this high-risk population, while further research is needed to identify modifiable risk factors.
PubMed ID
9698125 View in PubMed
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Health status of urban American Indians and Alaska Natives. A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3564
Source
JAMA. 1994 Mar 16;271(11):845-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-16-1994
Author
D C Grossman
J W Krieger
J R Sugarman
R A Forquera
Author Affiliation
Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98104-2499.
Source
JAMA. 1994 Mar 16;271(11):845-50
Date
Mar-16-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Vital statistics
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To use vital statistics and communicable disease reports to characterize the health status of an urban American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) population and compare it with urban whites and African Americans and with AI/ANs living on or near rural reservations. DESIGN--Descriptive analysis of routinely reported data. SETTING--One metropolitan county and seven rural counties with reservation land in Washington State. SUBJECTS--All reported births, deaths, and cases of selected communicable diseases occurring in the eight counties from 1981 through 1990. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Low birth weight, infant mortality, and prevalence of risk factors for poor birth outcomes; age-specific and cause-specific mortality; rates of reported hepatitis A and hepatitis B, tuberculosis, and sexually transmitted diseases. RESULTS--Urban AI/ANs had a much higher rate of low birth weight compared with urban whites and rural AI/ANs and had a higher rate of infant mortality than urban whites. During the 10 years, urban AI/AN infant mortality rates increased from 9.6 per 1000 live births to 18.6 per 1000 live births compared with no trend among the other populations. Compared with rural AI/AN mothers, urban AI/AN mothers were 50% more likely to receive late or no prenatal care during pregnancy. Relative to urban whites, urban AI/AN risk factors for poor birth outcomes (delayed prenatal care, adolescent age, and use of tobacco and alcohol) were more common and closely resembled the prevalence among the African-American population except for a higher rate of alcohol use among AI/ANs. Compared with urban whites, urban AI/AN mortality rates were higher in every age group except the elderly. Differences between urban whites and AI/ANs were largest for injury- and alcohol-related deaths. All-cause mortality was lower among urban AI/ANs compared with rural AI/ANs and urban African Americans, although injury- and alcohol-related deaths were higher for AI/ANs. All communicable diseases studied were significantly (P
PubMed ID
8114239 View in PubMed
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Injury hospitalizations among American Indian youth in Washington.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6089
Source
Inj Prev. 1999 Jun;5(2):119-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
S J Johnson
M. Sullivan
D C Grossman
Author Affiliation
Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, Seattle, WA 98104, USA.
Source
Inj Prev. 1999 Jun;5(2):119-23
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Data Collection
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Washington - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - classification - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the rate and causes of hospitalizations for injury among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth in the state of Washington, and to compare this with the rate of hospitalizations for injury among youth of all races. METHODS: Subjects were aged 0-19 years and were admitted to civilian hospitals for care of an injury (International Classification of Diseases N codes 800-995) in Washington between 1990 and 1994. Deaths occurring in the prehospital setting and emergency department are not included. Using several fields of identifying information, the Washington state hospital discharge database was linked with the Indian Health Service (IHS) patient registration database to identify AI/AN youth. Denominator data included the total age specific IHS user population for American Indians and US Census derived population estimates. Incidence ratios (IRs) were calculated to compare rates of hospitalization between AI/AN youth and all youth in Washington. RESULTS: A total of 694 and 29,048 hospitalizations for injury were identified for AI/AN youth and all races, respectively. The rate of hospitalization for injuries among AI/AN youth was 507 discharges per 100,000 youth (IR = 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20 to 1.40. The leading mechanism of injury was motor vehicles (IR 1.73, CI 1.49 to 2.01), followed by falls (IR 0.95, CI 0.79 to 1.15), and poisoning (IR 1.20, CI 0.80 to 1.78). The disparity was greater for intentional injuries (IR 1.71, CI 1.44 to 2.04). The highest IR for all unintentional injuries was for injuries from fire (IR 2.35, CI 1.42 to 3.87). AI/AN children aged 15-19 had the greatest disparity for rates of injury hospitalization (IR 1.4, CI 1.25 to 1.56). CONCLUSION: AI/AN youth in Washington had a higher hospitalization rate for injury compared with all youth in the state. Disparities were greatest for injuries related to motor vehicles and assaults. When linked, hospital discharge data can be used for surveillance of AI/AN hospitalizations.
PubMed ID
10385831 View in PubMed
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Treatment implications of comorbid psychopathology in American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11943
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1992-93;16(4):555-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
R D Walker
M D Lambert
P S Walker
D R Kivlahan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle.
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1992-93;16(4):555-72
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Rehabilitation Centers
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Social Environment
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper discusses treatment implications of comorbid psychopathology in the context of American Indian and Alaska Native culture and in the context of the Indian Health Service's Mental Health and Alcohol and Substance Abuse Program Branches. Treatment of comorbidity in this population is a particularly difficult problem due to numerous barriers to treatment and a poorly defined treatment system. As in other clinical populations, these patients are high utilizers of the limited treatment services available, but may not receive the type of treatment they need. After describing the extent of comorbidity in this population, we present an historical perspective of mental illness that provides an Indian's view of why we are where we are today in treating these problems. Next, we discuss Western and traditional treatment implications for comorbidity among adults and adolescents. Finally, we suggest directions for future research in this area.
PubMed ID
1305533 View in PubMed
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Use of the CES-D in an American Indian village.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3366
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1992-93;16(4):503-17
Publication Type
Article
Author
P D Somervell
J. Beals
J D Kinzie
J. Boehnlein
P. Leung
S M Manson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Health Sciences University, Denver 80262.
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1992-93;16(4):503-17
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Social Environment
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
In this paper, we examine the performance of a pencil-and-paper screening questionnaire on depressive symptoms (the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, or CES-D) in a sample of 120 adult American Indians belonging to a single Northwest Coast tribe. Results of factor analyses suggest that somatic complaints and emotional distress are not well differentiated from each other in this population. CES-D scores (which have shown good sensitivity and specificity for depressive disorders in this sample) also show weak and apparently nonsignificant trends to be elevated in the presence of other psychiatric diagnoses (including alcoholism) or general impairment. However, because of the use of a convenience sample (rather than a probability sample), analyses of associations between study factors--including comorbidity--are liable to produce spurious results due to selection bias (including Berkson bias). On this basis, we suggest that the use of probability samples should assume a high priority in cross-cultural studies. The study of the entire population of interest is another solution to the sampling problem, particularly in small communities.
PubMed ID
1305529 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.