Skip header and navigation

Refine By

228 records – page 1 of 23.

Acculturation, alcoholism and Indian-style Alcoholics Anonymous.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245019
Source
J Stud Alcohol Suppl. 1981 Jan;9:143-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1981

ADDRESSING SUBSTANCE-USE PROBLEMS IN TRIBAL HOME VISITING.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299191
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):287-294
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Date
05-2018
Author
Douglas K Novins
Cathy Ferron
Lisa Abramson
Allison Barlow
Author Affiliation
University of Colorado, Aurora.
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):287-294
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Culturally Competent Care - methods
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
House Calls
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Maternal health services
Needs Assessment
New Mexico
Pregnancy
Referral and Consultation
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Washington
Young Adult
Abstract
Given the high rates for substance use among women and men of childbearing age, perinatal and early childhood home-visiting programs serving tribal communities must consider how they will address substance-use problems among the families they support. In this study, we explored the approaches to identifying and addressing family-based substance-use problems that were implemented by nine home-visiting programs serving American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities that are funded through the federal Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (Tribal MIECHV). These programs demonstrated a high awareness of substance-use problems and took concrete action to address them above and beyond that included in the home-visiting model they used. All nine programs reported that they provided substance-use preventive services and screened for substance-use problems. While all programs referred to substance-use treatment programs when needed, in six programs the home visitor provided substance-use services. Through Tribal MIECHV, the intense need for substance-use education, assessment, service delivery, and referral in many AI/AN communities is pushing the home-visiting field forward to address this increasingly critical issue for low-income families across the United States and the world.
PubMed ID
29722426 View in PubMed
Less detail

The adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight among the poor in Washington State and British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218009
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
S J Katz
R W Armstrong
J P LoGerfo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Medicaid
National Health Programs
Odds Ratio
Parity
Poverty
Prenatal Care
Quality of Health Care
Risk factors
United States
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine differences in adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight between low-income women with Medicaid in Washington State and low-income women with Canadian provincial health insurance in British Columbia.
A population-based cross-sectional study was done by using linked birth certificates and claims data.
Overall, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate prenatal care in Washington (comparing women with Medicaid with those with private insurance) was 3.2. However, the risk varied by time of Medicaid enrollment relative to pregnancy (2.0, 1.0, 2.7, 6.3; for women who enrolled prior to pregnancy, during the first trimester, during the second trimester, or during the third trimester, respectively). In British Columbia, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate care (comparing women receiving a health premium subsidy with those receiving no subsidy) was 1.5 for women receiving a 100% subsidy and 1.2 for women receiving a 95% subsidy. The risk for low birthweight followed a similar trend in both regions, but there was no association with enrollment period in Washington.
Overall, the risk for inadequate prenatal care among poor women was much greater in Washington than in British Columbia. Most of the difference was due to Washington women's delayed enrollment in Medicaid. In both regions, the poor were at similar risk for low birthweight relative to their more affluent counterparts.
Notes
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1988 Aug;23(3):359-803403275
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1989 May-Jun;5(3):157-632663051
Cites: Health Care Financ Rev. 1989 Summer;10(4):1-1510313273
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Nov 7;264(17):2219-232214099
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1990 Sep-Oct;105(5):533-52120734
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 1990 Winter;9(4):91-1112289763
Cites: J Health Polit Policy Law. 1987 Summer;12(2):221-353302000
Cites: Fam Plann Perspect. 1991 May-Jun;23(3):123-81860478
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Jan 6;269(1):87-918416413
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1980 Sep;70(9):964-737406096
Cites: JAMA. 1986 Jan 3;255(1):48-523940304
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(1):41-93805233
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Aug;81(8):1013-61853992
PubMed ID
8203697 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ages of mutations on a coalescent tree.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203995
Source
Math Biosci. 1998 Oct;153(1):41-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
R. Thomson
Author Affiliation
Mathematics Department, Monash University, Clayton, Vic., Australia. rjt@mws4.biol.berkeley.edu
Source
Math Biosci. 1998 Oct;153(1):41-61
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Base Sequence - genetics
British Columbia
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Female
Genetics, Population
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Male
Markov Chains
Models, Biological
Mutation - genetics
Numerical Analysis, Computer-Assisted
Phylogeny
Poisson Distribution
Population Dynamics
Washington
Abstract
Using the coalescent process, DNA sequences of a sample of individuals can be used to study the phylogenetic history of the individuals. Under the infinitely-many-sites mutation model, the DNA sequence data can be summarized by the number of segregating sites (which is numerically equivalent to the number of mutations on the tree). A number of methods exist, including a recursive method presented in this paper, that obtain an estimate of the age of the most recent common ancestor (MRCA), given the number of mutations. This paper introduces a method for finding the ages of mutations, given the total number of mutations on the tree. While the result is not useful in estimating the age of a specific segregating site, it is useful in examining the underlying assumption of a relatively constant population over time. This utilization of the result is illustrated using DNA sequence data obtained from a sample of Amerindians of the Nuu-Chah-Nulth tribe.
PubMed ID
9810160 View in PubMed
Less detail

Air transport following surgical stabilization: an extension of regionalized trauma care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38472
Source
J Trauma. 1988 Jun;28(6):794-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1988
Author
S R Sharar
G K Luna
C L Rice
T D Valenzuela
M K Copass
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle 98104.
Source
J Trauma. 1988 Jun;28(6):794-8
Date
Jun-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aircraft - economics
Alaska
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Period
Prognosis
Regional Medical Programs - economics
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Transportation of Patients - economics - methods
Trauma Centers
Washington
Wounds and Injuries - surgery - therapy
Abstract
A 30-month retrospective review was performed of all trauma patients initially evaluated and operatively stabilized at Level III hospitals, with subsequent specialized air transport within 48 hours of injury to the regional Level I trauma center in Seattle. Nineteen patients were identified, with a mean ISS of 44 (range, 20-66). Mean transport time and distance were 2.4 hours and 456 miles, respectively. The estimated average ground transport time for the same patients was 23.8 hours. No deaths occurred during transport, and the overall survival rate was 58%. Transport charges averaged $4,162, which was 14% of the complete hospitalization cost. We conclude that: 1) patient survival after air transport was no different than that predicted for trauma victims with immediate access to a trauma center; 2) postoperative hemodynamic instability predicted a poor outcome; 3) the higher cost of air relative to ground transport is outweighed by significant time savings in these critically injured patients; and 4) air transport following operative stabilization represents an extension of regionalized trauma care to the isolated areas of Washington and Alaska.
PubMed ID
3385823 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaska's physician shortage: is enough being done to avoid a crisis?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152783
Source
Alaska Med. 2008 Sep;50:9-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Source
[Seattle, Wash. : WAMI Program, School of Medicine, University of Washington] v.
Publication Type
Journal
Date
-1981
Source
[Seattle, Wash. : WAMI Program, School of Medicine, University of Washington] v.
Date
-1981
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Journal
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Medical education -- Washington (state) -- Periodicals
Medical education -- Alaska -- Periodicals
Medical education -- Montana -- Periodicals
Medical education -- Idaho -- Periodicals
Notes
ALASKA R746.A4A4 (1978-79)
Merged with Idaho state report, WAMI Program; Montana state report, WAMI Program; and Washington state report, WAMI Program; top form: Annual WAMI state report
Less detail

American Indian perspectives on evidence-based practice implementation: results from a statewide Tribal Mental Health Gathering.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277764
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2015 Jan;42(1):29-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Sarah Cusworth Walker
Ron Whitener
Eric W Trupin
Natalie Migliarini
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2015 Jan;42(1):29-39
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation - methods
Cultural Competency
Evidence-Based Practice - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Washington
Abstract
Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices (EBP) within American Indian and Alaskan Natives communities is currently an area of debate and contention. There is considerable concern about expanding EBP policy mandates to AI/AN communities as these mandates, either through funding restrictions or other de facto policies, recall past histories of clinical colonization and exploitation by the state and federal government. As a response, work is being done to evaluate indigenous programs and examine strategies for culturally-sensitive implementation. While the literature reflects the perspectives of AI/AN populations on EBP generally, no one has yet reported the perspectives of AI/AN communities on how to feasibly achieve widespread EBP implementation. We report the findings of a statewide Tribal Gathering focused on behavioral health interventions for youth. The Gathering participants included AI/AN individuals as well as staff working with AI/AN populations in tribal communities. Participants identified strengths and weaknesses of the five legislatively fundable programs for youth delinquency in Washington State and discussed strategies likely to be effective in promoting increased uptake within tribes. Analysis of these discussions resulted in many useful insights in program-specific and community-driven strategies for implementation. In addition, two major themes emerged regarding widespread uptake: the importance of a multi-phase engagement strategy and adopting a consortium/learning community model for implementation. The findings from this Gathering offer important lessons that can inform current work regarding strategies to achieve a balance of program fidelity and cultural-alignment. Attending to engagement practices at the governance, community and individual level are likely to be key components of tribal-focused implementation. Further, efforts to embed implementation within a consortium or learning community hold considerable promise as a strategy for sustainability.
PubMed ID
24242820 View in PubMed
Less detail

American Indians and Alaska Natives: how do they find their path to medical school?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83386
Source
Acad Med. 2006 Oct;81(10 Suppl):S65-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Hollow Walter B
Patterson Davis G
Olsen Polly M
Baldwin Laura-Mae
Source
Acad Med. 2006 Oct;81(10 Suppl):S65-9
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Career Choice
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - economics
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews
Spirituality
Students, Medical - psychology
Washington
Abstract
BACKGROUND: American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) remain underrepresented in the medical profession. This study sought to understand the supports and barriers that AI/AN students encountered on their path to successful medical school entry. METHOD: The research team analyzed qualitative semistructured, one-on-one, confidential interviews with 10 AI/AN medical students to identify salient support and barrier themes. RESULTS: Supports and barriers clustered in eight categories: educational experiences, competing career options and priorities, health care experiences, financial factors, cultural connections, family and friends, spirituality, and discrimination. Some of the most notable findings of this study include the following: (1) students reported financial barriers severe enough to constrain participation in the medical school application process, and (2) spirituality played an important role as students pursued a medical career. CONCLUSION: Promoting AI/AN participation in medical careers can be facilitated with strategies appropriate to the academic, financial, and cultural needs of AI/AN students.
PubMed ID
17001139 View in PubMed
Less detail

228 records – page 1 of 23.