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The 6-Minute Walk Test as a Predictor of Summit Success on Denali.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279175
Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 2016 Mar;27(1):19-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Katherine M Shea
Eric R Ladd
Grant S Lipman
Patrick Bagley
Elizabeth A Pirrotta
Hurnan Vongsachang
N Ewen Wang
Paul S Auerbach
Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 2016 Mar;27(1):19-24
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mountaineering - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Walk Test - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
To test whether the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), including postexercise vital sign measurements and distance walked, predicts summit success on Denali, AK.
This was a prospective observational study of healthy volunteers between the ages of 18 and 65 years who had been at 4267 m for less than 24 hours on Denali. Physiologic measurements were made after the 6MWT. Subjects then attempted to summit at their own pace and, at the time of descent, completed a Lake Louise Acute Mountain Sickness Questionnaire and reported maximum elevation reached.
One hundred twenty-one participants enrolled in the study. Data were collected on 111 subjects (92% response rate), of whom 60% summited. On univariate analysis, there was no association between any postexercise vital sign and summit success. Specifically, there was no significant difference in the mean postexercise peripheral oxygen saturation (Spo2) between summiters (75%) and nonsummiters (74%; 95% CI, -3 to 1; P = .37). The distance a subject walked in 6 minutes (6MWTD) was longer in summiters (617 m) compared with nonsummiters (560 m; 95% CI, 7.6 to 106; P = .02). However, this significance was not maintained on a multivariate analysis performed to control for age, sex, and guide status (P = .08), leading to the conclusion that 6MWTD was not a robust predictor of summit success.
This study did not show a correlation between postexercise oxygen saturation or 6MWTD and summit success on Denali.
PubMed ID
26712335 View in PubMed
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The 6-min walk test: responses in healthy Canadians aged 45 to 85 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130789
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2011 Oct;36(5):643-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Kylie Hill
Lisa M Wickerson
Lynda J Woon
Afshin Heidar Abady
Tom J Overend
Roger S Goldstein
Dina Brooks
Author Affiliation
Department of Respirology, West Park Healthcare Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2011 Oct;36(5):643-9
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Exercise Test
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Respiration
Respiratory Rate
Sex Characteristics
Tidal Volume
Time Factors
Walking
Abstract
We sought to describe responses to the 6-min walk test (6MWT) in healthy Canadian adults in order to facilitate interpretation of its results in patient populations. Seventy-seven healthy Canadians aged 45 to 85 years (65 ± 11 years, 40 females) completed this study. During a single visit, three 6MWTs were undertaken. The main outcome measure was 6-min walk distance (6MWD). Age, gender, height, and weight were recorded. In 61 (79%) participants, cardiorespiratory variables were collected during the third 6MWT using a calibrated portable gas analysis system. The 6MWD increased between the first and second test (615 ± 96 to 639 ± 98 m; p
PubMed ID
21967531 View in PubMed
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A 10-year follow-up of a population-based study of people with multiple sclerosis in Stockholm, Sweden: changes in disability and the value of different factors in predicting disability and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108382
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2013 Sep 15;332(1-2):121-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2013
Author
Charlotte Chruzander
Sverker Johansson
Kristina Gottberg
Ulrika Einarsson
Sten Fredrikson
Lotta Widén Holmqvist
Charlotte Ytterberg
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Huddinge, Sweden. charlotte.chruzander@ki.se
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2013 Sep 15;332(1-2):121-7
Date
Sep-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Community Health Planning
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Walking - physiology
Abstract
Most people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) experience progressively worsening disability over a period of decades, thus further knowledge about the long-term changes in different areas of disability is essential.
The aims of this study were to evaluate changes in disability over ten years in PwMS, and to explore the value of personal and disease-specific factors and depressive symptoms in predicting disability. A further aim was to explore the value of these factors as predictors of mortality.
This study was based on a 10-year follow-up of a population-based study in Stockholm (n=166). Home visits were used to collect data on personal and disease-specific factors, walking ability, manual dexterity, cognitive function, mood, activities of daily living (ADL) and social/lifestyle activities.
The proportion of the study population who had disability in cognition, mood and social/lifestyle activities remained stable, while the proportion with disability in walking, manual dexterity and ADL increased. Disease severity predicted an increase in all studied variables of disability except in depressive symptoms. Older age and depressive symptoms were associated with mortality.
This study illustrates the importance of tailored interventions for PwMS and highlights the need for health-care professionals to consider the psychological aspects of the disease. Furthermore, our results indicate that the Expanded Disability Status Scale was a useful tool for predicting future disability.
PubMed ID
23896259 View in PubMed
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A 2011 updated systematic review and clinical practice guideline for the management of malignant extradural spinal cord compression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126132
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2012 Oct 1;84(2):312-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2012
Author
D Andrew Loblaw
Gunita Mitera
Michael Ford
Normand J Laperriere
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. andrew.loblaw@sunnybrook.ca
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2012 Oct 1;84(2):312-7
Date
Oct-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Decompression, Surgical - methods
Dose Fractionation
Humans
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - radiotherapy
Ontario
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Retrospective Studies
Spinal Cord Compression - diagnosis - therapy
Spinal Cord Neoplasms - secondary - therapy
Steroids - therapeutic use
Walking
Abstract
To update the 2005 Cancer Care Ontario practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of extradural malignant spinal cord compression (MESCC).
A review and analysis of data published from January 2004 to May 2011. The systematic literature review included published randomized control trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and prospective/retrospective studies.
An RCT of radiation therapy (RT) with or without decompressive surgery showed improvements in pain, ambulatory ability, urinary continence, duration of continence, functional status, and overall survival. Two RCTs of RT (30 Gy in eight fractions vs. 16 Gy in two fractions; 16 Gy in two fractions vs. 8 Gy in one fraction) in patients with a poor prognosis showed no difference in ambulation, duration of ambulation, bladder function, pain response, in-field failure, and overall survival. Retrospective multicenter studies reported that protracted RT schedules in nonsurgical patients with a good prognosis improved local control but had no effect on functional or survival outcomes.
If not medically contraindicated, steroids are recommended for any patient with neurologic deficits suspected or confirmed to have MESCC. Surgery should be considered for patients with a good prognosis who are medically and surgically operable. RT should be given to nonsurgical patients. For those with a poor prognosis, a single fraction of 8 Gy should be given; for those with a good prognosis, 30 Gy in 10 fractions could be considered. Patients should be followed up clinically and/or radiographically to determine whether a local relapse develops. Salvage therapies should be introduced before significant neurologic deficits occur.
PubMed ID
22420969 View in PubMed
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Acceleration and sprint profiles of a professional elite football team in match play.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267270
Source
Eur J Sport Sci. 2015;15(2):101-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jørgen Ingebrigtsen
Terje Dalen
Geir Håvard Hjelde
Barry Drust
Ulrik Wisløff
Source
Eur J Sport Sci. 2015;15(2):101-10
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acceleration
Athletic Performance
Football
Humans
Movement
Norway
Physical Exertion
Running
Soccer
Walking
Abstract
The aim of this study was to characterise the acceleration and sprint profiles of elite football match play in one Norwegian elite football team (Rosenborg FC). Fifteen professional players in five playing positions took part in the study (n = 101 observations). Player movement was recorded during every domestic home game of one full season (n = 15) by an automatic tracking system based on microwave technology. Each player performed 91 ± 21 accelerations per match, with a lower number in the second compared with the first half (47 ± 12 vs. 44 ± 12). Players in lateral positions accelerated more often compared to players in central positions (98.3 ± 20.5 vs. 85.3 ± 19.5, p
PubMed ID
25005777 View in PubMed
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Accelerometer-determined physical activity in adults and older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132641
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Feb;44(2):266-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Bjørge Herman Hansen
Elin Kolle
Sindre Mikal Dyrstad
Ingar Holme
Sigmund Alfred Anderssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway. bjorge.herman.hansen@nih.no
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Feb;44(2):266-72
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Ambulatory - instrumentation
Motor Activity
Norway
Sedentary lifestyle
Walking
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a lack of large-scale comparable data on the population levels of physical activity (PA) and sedentary activity. We conducted a cross-sectional population-based multicenter study to describe the levels of PA and sedentary activity and to determine adherence to current national PA recommendations in Norwegian adults and older people.
In 2008 and 2009, PA was assessed objectively for seven consecutive days using the ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer in 3867 participants age 20-85 yr. A total of 3267 participants provided valid PA assessments that met all inclusion criteria.
Women and men did not differ in the overall activity levels (335 and 342 counts per minute, respectively) or in steps per day (8113 and 7951 steps per day, respectively). However, for intensity-specific PA, men accumulated significantly more minutes of sedentary activity and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) compared with women (557 vs 533 min of sedentary activity, P = 0.001 and 35 vs 33 min of MVPA, P = 0.01). Both overall activity levels and steps per day remained steady with age, until 65 yr, after which activity levels declined.
Overall, the study sample spent 62% of their time being sedentary, 25% in low-intensity PA, 9% in lifestyle activity, and 4% in MVPA. One in five people met current national PA recommendations. These results suggest that adults and older people spend the majority of their time being sedentary and that adherence to PA recommendations is low.
PubMed ID
21796052 View in PubMed
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ACE genotype and physical training effects: a randomized study among elderly Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49706
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2003 Aug;15(4):284-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Henrik Frederiksen
Lise Bathum
Charlotte Worm
Kaare Christensen
Lis Puggaard
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Epidemiology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. hfrederiksen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2003 Aug;15(4):284-91
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomechanics
Body Composition
Denmark
Exercise
Exercise Test
Frail Elderly
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Oxygen consumption
Patient Selection
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - genetics
Walking - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The level of physical functioning (PF) late in life has, in recent years, been shown to be influenced by genetic factors. One of the most extensively studied genetic variants associated with PF and trainability is insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in the gene encoding Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE). However, ACE studies have mainly been conducted among younger persons in excellent physical shape. In this study, we examine whether the level of PF, trainability, or rate-of-change are associated with the ACE genotype among the elderly. METHODS: We used data from 4 randomized training studies of elderly Danes (N = 203). The measures of PF were self-report, maximal oxygen uptake, muscle strength, walking speed, and body composition. RESULTS: Overall, a favorable change in the measures of PF was observed in training groups compared with control groups. However, within groups, neither pre- or post-training/control period levels of PF nor differences in pre- and post-levels were associated with the ACE genotype. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of our randomized studies, we could not detect any association between the ACE genotype and the level of PF or change, regardless of whether response to physical training or spontaneous changes was studied.
PubMed ID
14661817 View in PubMed
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Achieving recommended daily physical activity levels through commuting by public transportation: unpacking individual and contextual influences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113392
Source
Health Place. 2013 Sep;23:18-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Rania A Wasfi
Nancy A Ross
Ahmed M El-Geneidy
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, McGill University, 805 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A2K6. rania.wasfi@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Health Place. 2013 Sep;23:18-25
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Transportation - methods
Urban Population
Walking - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper estimates the amount of daily walking associated with using public transportation in a large metropolitan area and examines individual and contextual characteristics associated with walking distances. Total walking distance to and from transit was calculated from a travel diary survey for 6913 individuals. Multilevel regression modelling was used to examine the underlying factors associated with walking to public transportation. The physical activity benefits of public transportation varied along gender and socio-economic lines. Recommended minutes of daily physical activity can be achieved for public transportation users, especially train users living in affluent suburbs.
PubMed ID
23732403 View in PubMed
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Achieving the daily step goal of 10,000 steps: the experience of a Canadian family attached to pedometers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161755
Source
Clin Invest Med. 2007;30(3):E108-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Bernard C K Choi
Anita W P Pak
Jerome C L Choi
Elaine C L Choi
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Bernard.Choi@utoronto.ca
Source
Clin Invest Med. 2007;30(3):E108-13
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Family Health
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Life Style
Male
Monitoring, Ambulatory - instrumentation - methods
Pilot Projects
Reproducibility of Results
Walking
Abstract
Health experts recommend daily step goals of 10,000 steps for adults and 12,000 steps for youths to achieve a healthy active living. This article reports the findings of a Canadian family project to investigate whether the recommended daily step goals are achievable in a real life setting, and suggests ways to increase the daily steps to meet the goal. The family project also provides an example to encourage more Canadians to conduct family projects on healthy living.
This is a pilot feasibility study. A Canadian family was recruited for the study, with 4 volunteers (father, mother, son and daughter). Each volunteer was asked to wear a pedometer and to record daily steps for three time periods of each day during a 2-month period. Both minimal routine steps, and additional steps from special non-routine activities, were recorded at work, school and home.
The mean number of daily steps from routine minimal daily activities for the family was 6685 steps in a day (16 hr, approx 400 steps/hr). There was thus a mean deficit of 4315 steps per day, or approximately 30,000 steps per week, from the goal (10,000 steps for adults; 12,000 steps for youths). Special activities that were found to effectively increase the steps above the routine level include: walking at brisk pace, grocery shopping, window shopping in a mall, going to an entertainment centre, and attending parties (such as to celebrate the holiday season and birthdays).
To increase our daily steps to meet the daily step goal, a new culture is recommended: "get off the chair". By definition, sitting on a chair precludes the opportunity to walk. We encourage people to get off the chair, to go shopping, and to go partying, as a practical and fun way to increase the daily steps. This paper is a call for increased physical activity to meet the daily step goal.
PubMed ID
17716548 View in PubMed
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Active Commuting Behaviors in a Nordic Metropolitan Setting in Relation to Modality, Gender, and Health Recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274992
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Dec;12(12):15626-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Erik Stigell
Peter Schantz
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Dec;12(12):15626-48
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bicycling - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Transportation - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Walking - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Active commuting between home and place of work or study is often cited as an interesting source of physical activity in a public health perspective. However, knowledge about these behaviors is meager. This was therefore studied in adult active commuters (n = 1872) in Greater Stockholm, Sweden, a Nordic metropolitan setting. They received questionnaires and individually adjusted maps to draw their normal commuting route. Three different modality groups were identified in men and women: single-mode cyclists and pedestrians (those who only cycle or walk, respectively) and dual-mode commuters (those who alternately walk or cycle). Some gender differences were observed in trip distances, frequencies, and velocities. A large majority of the commuting trip durations met the minimum health recommendation of at least 10-minute-long activity bouts. The median single-mode pedestrians and dual-mode commuters met or were close to the recommended weekly physical activity levels of at least 150 minutes most of the year, whereas the single-mode cyclists did so only during spring-mid-fall. A high total number of trips per year (range of medians: 230-390) adds to the value in a health perspective. To fully grasp active commuting behaviors in future studies, both walking and cycling should be assessed over different seasons and ideally over the whole year.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26690193 View in PubMed
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575 records – page 1 of 58.