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[100,000 operations in the cataract registry. Outcome and benefit is followed-up as a next step]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51118
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Feb 22;92(8):748-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-1995
Author
M. Lundström
U. Stenevi
W. Thorburn
Author Affiliation
Ogonkliniken, Centrallasarettet, Karlskrona.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Feb 22;92(8):748-50
Date
Feb-22-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cataract Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Prognosis
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Visual acuity
Waiting Lists
PubMed ID
7869796 View in PubMed
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The 2012 SAGE wait times program: Survey of Access to GastroEnterology in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115731
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;27(2):83-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Desmond Leddin
David Armstrong
Mark Borgaonkar
Ronald J Bridges
Carlo A Fallone
Jennifer J Telford
Ying Chen
Palma Colacino
Paul Sinclair
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;27(2):83-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Colonoscopy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastroenterology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Periodically surveying wait times for specialist health services in Canada captures current data and enables comparisons with previous surveys to identify changes over time.
During one week in April 2012, Canadian gastroenterologists were asked to complete a questionnaire (online or by fax) recording demographics, reason for referral, and dates of referral and specialist visits for at least 10 consecutive new patients (five consultations and five procedures) who had not been seen previously for the same indication. Wait times were determined for 18 indications and compared with those from similar surveys conducted in 2008 and 2005.
Data regarding adult patients were provided by 173 gastroenterologists for 1374 consultations, 540 procedures and 293 same-day consultations and procedures. Nationally, the median wait times were 92 days (95% CI 85 days to 100 days) from referral to consultation, 55 days (95% CI 50 days to 61 days) from consultation to procedure and 155 days (95% CI 142 days to 175 days) (total) from referral to procedure. Overall, wait times were longer in 2012 than in 2005 (P
Notes
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jun;20(6):411-2316779459
Cites: Colorectal Dis. 2006 Jul;8(6):480-316784466
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2007 Mar;102(3):478-8117335442
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):155-6018299734
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):161-718299735
Cites: Healthc Q. 2009;12(3):72-919553768
Cites: Health Manag Technol. 2012 Mar;33(3):12-322515048
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;24(1):33-920186354
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2010 Oct;19(5):e2720584706
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2011 Feb;25(2):78-8221321678
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2011 Oct;25(10):547-5422059159
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2012 Jan;26(1):17-3122308578
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;24(1):20-520186352
PubMed ID
23472243 View in PubMed
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The 2015 hospital treatment choice reform in Norway: Continuity or change?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285277
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ånen Ringard
Ingrid Sperre Saunes
Anna Sagan
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Expenditures
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - economics - organization & administration
Hospitals, Private - economics
Humans
Norway
Patient Preference
Politics
Waiting Lists
Abstract
In several European countries, including Norway, polices to increase patient choice of hospital provider have remained high on the political agenda. The main reason behind the interest in hospital choice reforms in Norway has been the belief that increasing choice can remedy the persistent problem of long waiting times for elective hospital care. Prior to the 2013 General Election, the Conservative Party campaigned in favour of a new choice reform: "the treatment choice reform". This article describes the background and process leading up to introduction of the reform in the autumn of 2015. It also provides a description of the content and discusses possible implications of the reform for patients, providers and government bodies. In sum, the reform contains elements of both continuity and change. The main novelty of the reform lies in the increased role of private for-profit healthcare providers.
PubMed ID
27005300 View in PubMed
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The 2015 National Cancer Program in Sweden: Introducing standardized care pathways in a decentralized system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284148
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Dec;120(12):1378-1382
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Jens Wilkens
Hans Thulesius
Ingrid Schmidt
Christina Carlsson
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Dec;120(12):1378-1382
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Protocols - standards
Continuity of Patient Care
Health Care Reform - methods
Health Policy
Humans
National Health Programs
Patient satisfaction
Politics
Sweden
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Starting in 2015, the Swedish government has initiated a national reform to standardize cancer patient pathways and thereby eventually speed up treatment of cancer. Cancer care in Sweden is characterized by high survival rates and a generally high quality albeit long waiting times. The objective with the new national program to standardize cancer care pathways is to reduce these waiting times, increase patient satisfaction with cancer care and reduce regional inequalities. A new time-point for measuring the start of a care process is introduced called well-founded suspicion, which is individually designed for each cancer diagnosis. While medical guidelines are well established earlier, the standardisation is achieved by defining time boundaries for each step in the process. The cancer reform program is a collaborative effort initiated and incentivized by the central government while multi-professional groups develop the time-bound standardized care pathways, which the regional authorities are responsible for implementing. The broad stakeholder engagement and time-bound guidelines are interesting approaches to study for other countries that need to streamline care processes.
PubMed ID
27823827 View in PubMed
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Accessibility and the Canadian health care system: squaring perceptions and realities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182001
Source
Health Policy. 2004 Feb;67(2):137-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Kathi Wilson
Mark W Rosenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ont., Canada L5L 1C6. kwilson@eratos.erin.utoronto.ca
Source
Health Policy. 2004 Feb;67(2):137-48
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Canada
Family Characteristics
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - organization & administration - standards - utilization
Public Opinion
Socioeconomic Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The 1984 Canada Health Act (CHA) is the major piece of Federal legislation that governs health care accessibility in the provinces and territories. According to the CHA, all provinces and territories in Canada must uphold five principles in order to receive federal funding for health care (universality, comprehensiveness, portability, public administration, and accessibility). In Canada, there are competing views among policy makers and consumers about how the CHA's principle of accessibility should be defined, interpreted and used in delivering health care. During the 1990s, the health care perceptions of Canadians and their health care behaviours were measured through both public opinion polls and Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey (NPHS). The goal of this paper is to examine perceptions of accessibility in public opinion polls and actual accessibility as measured through the NPHS. Public opinion polls demonstrate that while Canadians want to preserve the principles of the CHA, a majority of Canadians are losing confidence in their health care system. In contrast, the results from the NPHS reveal that only 6% of Canadians aged 25 years and older have experienced accessibility problems. Among those who report access problems, the barriers to accessibility are linked to specific socio-economic, socio-demographic and health characteristics of individuals. We discuss these findings in the context of the current debates surrounding accessibility within the CHA and the Canadian health care system.
PubMed ID
14720632 View in PubMed
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[Accessibility and waiting time in general practice. A patient study in Northern Norway in 1987].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228019
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Nov 10;110(27):3484-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1990
Author
B. Straume
A. Forsdahl
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisin, Universitetet i Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Nov 10;110(27):3484-8
Date
Nov-10-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Appointments and Schedules
Consumer Satisfaction
Family Practice - organization & administration - standards
Female
Home Care Services - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Waiting Lists
Abstract
In the opinion of the public, accessibility is probably one of the most important features of general practice. More than 3,500 patients in North Norway answered a questionnaire asking for their opinions on waiting time for consultation, the time spent in consultation and the possibility of the doctor visiting them at home. 80% thought that a waiting time of more than one week was too long. The actual waiting times differ considerably, but only a few practices serving less than 900 inhabitants per physician managed to satisfy their patients. On the other hand, about 80% found the time allocated for the consultation to be adequate. Almost half the patients who expressed an opinion thought it too difficult to get a doctor to visit them at home. Less than 10% considered a long distance to travel to a doctor to be an obstacle. Not surprisingly, young people were most demanding as regards quick service. Men were somewhat more satisfied than women, as were patients in rural areas compared with patients in the towns. In our opinion, some of the patients' causes of dissatisfaction can be removed by better routines. However, it seems that the resources available within general practice, are inadequate to meet all the patients' wishes, either now or in the future.
PubMed ID
2256076 View in PubMed
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Access to adult liver transplantation in Canada: a survey and ethical analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212821
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Feb 1;154(3):337-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1996
Author
M A Mullen
N. Kohut
M. Sam
L. Blendis
P A Singer
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Feb 1;154(3):337-42
Date
Feb-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Data Collection
Health Care Rationing - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Liver Transplantation
Organizational Policy
Patient Selection
Resource Allocation
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To describe the substantive and procedural criteria used for placing patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation and for allocating available livers to patients on the waiting list; to identify principal decision-makers and the main factors limiting liver transplantation in Canada; and to examine how closely cadaveric liver allocation resembles theoretic models of source allocation.
Mailed survey.
Medical directors of all seven Canadian adult liver transplantation centres, or their designates. Six of the questionnaires were completed.
Relative importance of substantive and procedural criteria used to place patients in the waiting list for liver transplantation and to allocate available livers. Identification of principal decision-makers and main limiting factors to adult liver transplantation.
Alcoholism, drug addiction, HIV positivity, primary liver cancer, noncompliance and hepatitis B were the most important criteria that had a negative influence on decisions to place patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation. Severity of disease and urgency were the most important criteria used for selecting patients on the waiting list for transplantation. Criteria that were inconsistent across the centres included social support (for deciding who is placed on the waiting list) and length of time on the waiting list (for deciding who is selected from the list). Although a variety of people were reported as being involved in these decisions, virtually all were reported to be health to be health care professionals. Thirty-seven patients died while waiting for liver transplantation in 1991; the scarcity of cadaveric livers was the main limiting factor.
Criteria for resource allocation decisions regarding liver transplantation are generally consistent among the centres across Canada, although some important inconsistencies remain. Because patients die while on the waiting list and because the primary limiting factor is organ supply, increased organ acquisition efforts are needed.
Notes
Cites: Psychosomatics. 1993 Jul-Aug;34(4):314-238351306
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1990 Mar;150(3):523-72178581
Cites: BMJ. 1990 Jul 7;301(6742):15-72383700
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Oct 24;325(17):1243-61845039
PubMed ID
8564903 View in PubMed
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Access to and waiting time for psychiatrist services in a Canadian urban area: a study in real time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131782
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;56(8):474-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Elliot M Goldner
Wayne Jones
Mei Lan Fang
Author Affiliation
Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia. egoldner@sfu.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;56(8):474-80
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Cognitive Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To obtain improved quality information regarding psychiatrist waiting times by use of a novel methodological approach in which accessibility and wait times are determined by a real-time patient referral procedure.
An adult male patient with depression was referred for psychiatric assessment by a family physician. Consecutive calls were made to all registered psychiatrists (n = 297) in Vancouver. A semistructured call procedure was used to collect information about the psychiatrists' availability for receipt of this and similar referrals, identify factors that affect psychiatrist accessibility, and determine the availability of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT).
Efforts were made to contact 297 psychiatrists and 230 (77%) were reached successfully. Among the 230 psychiatrists contacted, 160 (70%) indicated that they were unable to accept the referral. Although 70 (30%) indicated that they might be able to consider accepting a referral, 64 (91% of those who would consider accepting the referral) indicated that they would need to review detailed, written referral information and could not provide estimates of the length of wait times if the patient was to be accepted. Only 6 (3% of the 230 psychiatrists contacted) offered immediate appointment times and their wait times ranged from 4 to 55 days. When asked whether they could provide CBT, most (56%) psychiatrists in clinical practice answered maybe.
Substantial barriers exist for family physicians attempting to refer patients for psychiatric referral. Consolidated efforts to improve access to psychiatric assessment are needed.
PubMed ID
21878158 View in PubMed
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Access to an outpatient cardiology consultation in southwestern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201158
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1999 Aug;15(8):879-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
D. Massel
Author Affiliation
The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. dmassel@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1999 Aug;15(8):879-83
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - statistics & numerical data
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Cardiology - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Ontario
Population Density
Private Practice - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To determine whether there were differences in waiting time for a consultation for a nonurgent cardiology problem among specialists in an academic centre compared with those in community practice.
Cross-sectional telephone survey.
Southwestern Ontario.
Academically affiliated and community-based specialists in cardiology or internal medicine with an interest in cardiology.
Waiting period in weeks for outpatient consultation.
Among community specialists, those with cardiology training had significantly longer waiting times than those without for nonurgent cardiology consultation (median 8.6 versus 3.8 weeks, P=0.0077). Waiting times for consultation were significantly longer for academic specialists than for those in community practice (median 9.1 versus 4.1 weeks, P=0.0013). Significantly longer waiting times exist in communities with a population greater than 100,000 (median 9.1 versus 4.0 weeks, P=0.0005).
Waiting times for consultation for a nonurgent cardiology problem are long. Waiting times are longer for physicians with certification in cardiology, in the academic medical centre and in larger communities.
PubMed ID
10446435 View in PubMed
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Access to care and satisfaction in colorectal cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172325
Source
World J Surg. 2005 Nov;29(11):1444-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Geoffrey A Porter
Karen M Inglis
Lori A Wood
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, 7-007 Victoria Building, QEII Health Sciences Center, 1278 Tower Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 2Y9, Canada. Geoff.Porter@dal.ca
Source
World J Surg. 2005 Nov;29(11):1444-51
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - surgery
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Nova Scotia
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Waiting Lists
Abstract
This study described the various components of access to care for resectable colorectal cancer, and correlated the timeliness of these components with patient satisfaction. With a prospective/retrospective cohort design, all patients undergoing surgical resection for primary colorectal cancer from 2/1/01 to 15/12/01, were identified during their admission for surgery. A comprehensive, standardized method of ascertaining specific time intervals, which included a patient interview, was used. A patient satisfaction questionnaire was developed, tested, and used in consenting patients. Over the study period, 118 patients underwent colorectal cancer resection. Of these, 110 (93%) consented to participate and 101 (86%) completed the satisfaction questionnaire, including test-retest. The median time intervals (interquartile range) for the various components of access to care were as follows: symptoms to first physician visit, 32 days (10-75); first physician visit to diagnosis, 88 days (44-218); diagnosis to surgery, 19 days (10-44); surgery to chemotherapy (where applicable), 54 days (47-72). On multivariate analysis, tumor location in the rectum was associated with longer prediagnosis intervals, whereas increasing tumor stage was associated with shorter intervals from diagnosis to surgery. Variation in the time interval from diagnosis to surgery was associated with patient satisfaction (r = 0.49; P
PubMed ID
16240060 View in PubMed
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835 records – page 1 of 84.