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A 10-Year Follow-Up of Adiposity and Dementia in Swedish Adults Aged 70 Years and Older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300956
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Ilse A C Arnoldussen
Valter Sundh
Kristoffer Bäckman
Silke Kern
Svante Östling
Kaj Blennow
Henrik Zetterberg
Ingmar Skoog
Amanda J Kiliaan
Deborah R Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adiposity
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Dementia - blood - epidemiology - pathology
Fasting
Female
Humans
Independent living
Leptin - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Adiposity measured in mid- or late-life and estimated using anthropometric measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), or metabolic markers such as blood leptin and adiponectin levels, is associated with late-onset dementia risk. However, during later life, this association may reverse and aging- and dementia-related processes may differentially affect adiposity measures.
We explored associations of concurrent BMI, WHR, and blood leptin and high molecular weight adiponectin levels with dementia occurrence.
924 Swedish community-dwelling elderly without dementia, aged 70 years and older, systematically-sampled by birth day and birth year population-based in the Gothenburg city region of Sweden. The Gothenburg Birth Cohort Studies are designed for evaluating risk and protective factors for dementia. All dementias diagnosed after age 70 for 10 years were identified. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to predict dementia occurrence between 2000-2005, 2005-2010, and 2000-2010 after excluding prevalent baseline (year 2000) dementias. Baseline levels of BMI, WHR, leptin, and adiponectin were used.
Within 5 years of baseline, low BMI (
PubMed ID
29758945 View in PubMed
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17-beta-estradiol in relation to age at menarche and adult obesity in premenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86676
Source
Hum Reprod. 2008 Apr;23(4):919-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Emaus A.
Espetvedt S.
Veierød M B
Ballard-Barbash R.
Furberg A-S
Ellison P T
Jasienska G.
Hjartåker A.
Thune I.
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Ullevål University Hospital, 0407 Oslo, Norway. aina.emaus@medisin.uio.no
Source
Hum Reprod. 2008 Apr;23(4):919-27
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Breast Neoplasms
Estradiol - analysis - physiology
Female
Humans
Menarche - physiology
Menstrual Cycle - physiology
Norway
Obesity - physiopathology
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Saliva - chemistry
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We hypothesize that premenopausal endogenous estradiol may be associated with age at menarche and adult overweight and obesity, potentially contributing to breast cancer risk. METHODS: We assessed age at menarche by questionnaire among 204 healthy Norwegian women, aged 25-35 years. Measures of body composition included body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)), waist circumference (WC, cm), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and fat percentage dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, (DEXA). Daily salivary 17-beta-estradiol (E(2)) concentrations were collected throughout one entire menstrual cycle and assessed by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Linear regression analyses and linear mixed models for repeated measures were used and potential confounding factors and effect modifiers were tested. RESULTS: Among women with an early age at menarche (
PubMed ID
18227106 View in PubMed
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A 24-year follow-up of body mass index and cerebral atrophy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9325
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2004
Author
D. Gustafson
L. Lissner
C. Bengtsson
C. Björkelund
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA. deb.gustafson@neuro.gu.se
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Date
Nov-23-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Atrophy
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cerebral Cortex - pathology - radiography
Comorbidity
Dementia - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the longitudinal relationship between body mass index (BMI), a major vascular risk factor, and cerebral atrophy, a marker of neurodegeneration, in a population-based sample of middle-aged women. METHODS: A representative sample of 290 women born in 1908, 1914, 1918, and 1922 was examined in 1968 to 1969, 1974 to 1975, 1980 to 1981, and 1992 to 1993 as part of the Population Study of Women in Göteborg, Sweden. At each examination, women completed a survey on a variety of health and lifestyle factors and underwent anthropometric, clinical, and neuropsychiatric assessments and blood collection. Atrophy of the temporal, frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes was measured on CT in 1992 when participants were age 70 to 84. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between BMI and brain measures. RESULTS: Women with atrophy of the temporal lobe were, on average, 1.1 to 1.5 kg/m2 higher in BMI at all examinations than women without temporal atrophy (p
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2005 Jun 14;64(11):1990-1; author reply 1990-115955971
SummaryForPatientsIn: Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):E19-2015557485
PubMed ID
15557505 View in PubMed
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2006 Canadian clinical practice guidelines on the management and prevention of obesity in adults and children [summary].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164223
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):S1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2007
Author
David C W Lau
James D Douketis
Katherine M Morrison
Irene M Hramiak
Arya M Sharma
Ehud Ur
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Julia McFarlane Diabetes Research Centre, Diabetes and Endocrine Research Group, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta. dcwlau@ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):S1-13
Date
Apr-10-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Bariatric Surgery
Behavior Therapy
Body mass index
Bulimia Nervosa - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Depressive Disorder - psychology
Diet
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Medicine
Exercise
Health Behavior
Health education
Humans
Life Style
Obesity - classification - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Research - trends
Waist-Hip Ratio
Notes
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PubMed ID
17420481 View in PubMed
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Abdominal obesity and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes in a Swedish community. Skaraborg hypertension and diabetes project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79717
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Dec;24(4):211-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Bari Muhammad Rizuanul
Ostgren Carl Johan
Råstam Lennart
Lindblad Ulf
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Skövde, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Dec;24(4):211-7
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat
Aged
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - complications - drug therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - complications
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore the association between abdominal obesity and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. DESIGN: A cross-sectional observational study. SETTING: Primary care in Skara, Sweden. SUBJECTS: A total of 198 men and 186 women with type 2 diabetes who consecutively completed an annual check-up in 1992-1993. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Abdominal obesity was defined according to criteria for the metabolic syndrome using the waist circumference (WC): > 102 cm for men and > 88 cm for women. Insulin resistance was estimated using the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA), and was dichotomized by the 75th percentile (IR). RESULTS: Abdominal obesity was found in 66 men (33%), and in 106 women (57%). Pearson's correlation coefficients between components of the metabolic syndrome and IR were statistically significant for WC, waist-hip ratio, serum triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol, and were higher for WC (0.40) than for waist-hip ratio (0.23) in both genders (p
PubMed ID
17118860 View in PubMed
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Abdominal obesity increases the risk of hip fracture. A population-based study of 43,000 women and men aged 60-79 years followed for 8 years. Cohort of Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261630
Source
J Intern Med. 2015 Mar;277(3):306-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
A J Søgaard
K. Holvik
T K Omsland
G S Tell
C. Dahl
B. Schei
J A Falch
J A Eisman
H E Meyer
Source
J Intern Med. 2015 Mar;277(3):306-17
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The question as to whether abdominal obesity has an adverse effect on hip fracture remains unanswered. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations of waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-hip ratio, and body mass index with incident hip fracture.
The data in this prospective study is based on Cohort of Norway, a population-based cohort established during 1994-2003. Altogether 19,918 women and 23,061 men aged 60-79 years were followed for a median of 8.1 years. Height, weight, waist and hip circumference were measured at baseline using standard procedures. Information on covariates was collected by questionnaires. Hip fractures (n = 1,498 in women, n = 889 in men) were identified from electronic discharge registers from all general hospitals in Norway between 1994 and 2008.
The risk of hip fracture decreased with increasing body mass index, plateauing in obese men. However, higher waist circumference and higher waist-hip ratio were associated with an increased risk of hip fracture after adjustment for body mass index and other potential confounders. Women in the highest tertile of waist circumference had an 86% (95% CI: 51-129%) higher risk of hip fracture compared to the lowest, with a corresponding increased risk in men of 100% (95% CI 53-161%). Lower body mass index combined with abdominal obesity increased the risk of hip fracture considerably, particularly in men.
Abdominal obesity was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture when body mass index was taken into account. In view of the increasing prevalence of obesity and the number of older people suffering osteoporotic fractures in Western societies, our findings have important clinical and public health implications.
PubMed ID
24597977 View in PubMed
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Adiposity among children in Norway by urbanity and maternal education: a nationally representative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107305
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:842
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anna Biehl
Ragnhild Hovengen
Else-Karin Grøholt
Jøran Hjelmesæth
Bjørn Heine Strand
Haakon E Meyer
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P,O, Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway. anna.biehl@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:842
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mothers - education
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Pediatric Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Public Health
Risk assessment
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
International research has demonstrated that rural residency is a risk factor for childhood adiposity. The main aim of this study was to investigate the urban-rural gradient in overweight and obesity and whether the association differed by maternal education.
Height, weight and waist circumference (WC) were measured in a nationally representative sample of 3166 Norwegian eight-year-olds in 2010. Anthropometric measures were stratified by area of residence (urbanity) and maternal education. Risk estimates for overweight (including obesity) and waist-to-height ratio =0.5 were calculated by log-binomial regression.
Mean BMI and WC and risk estimates of overweight (including obesity) and waist-to-height ratio =0.5 were associated with both urbanity and maternal education. These associations were robust after mutual adjustment for each other. Furthermore, there was an indication of interaction between urbanity and maternal education, as trends of mean BMI and WC increased from urban to rural residence among children of low-educated mothers (p?=?0.01 for both BMI and WC), whereas corresponding trends for children from higher educational background were non-significant (p?>?0.30). However, formal tests of the interaction term urbanity by maternal education were non-significant (p-value for interaction was 0.29 for BMI and 0.31 for WC).
In this nationally representative study, children living rurally and children of low-educated mothers had higher mean BMI and waist circumference than children living in more urban areas and children of higher educated mothers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24028668 View in PubMed
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Adiposity and incidence of heart failure hospitalization and mortality: a population-based prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95071
Source
Circ Heart Fail. 2009 May;2(3):202-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Levitan Emily B
Yang Amy Z
Wolk Alicja
Mittleman Murray A
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Mass, USA. elevitan@bidmc.harvard.edu
Source
Circ Heart Fail. 2009 May;2(3):202-8
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Female
Heart Failure - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with heart failure (HF) incidence. We examined the strength of the association of body mass index (BMI) with HF by age and joint associations of BMI and waist circumference (WC). METHODS AND RESULTS: Women aged 48 to 83 (n=36873) and men aged 45 to 79 (n=43487) self-reported height, weight, and WC. HF hospitalization or death (n=382 women, 718 men) between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2004, was determined through administrative registers. Hazard ratios, from Cox proportional-hazards models, for an interquartile range higher BMI were 1.39 (95% CI, 1.15 to 1.68) at age 60 and 1.13 (95% CI, 1.02 to 1.27) at 75 in women. In men, hazard ratios were 1.54 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.73) at 60 and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.16 to 1.35) at 75. A 10-cm higher WC was associated with 15% (95% CI, 2% to 31%) and 18% (95% CI, 4% to 33%) higher HF rates among women with BMI 25 and 30 kg/m(2), respectively; hazard ratios for 1 kg/m(2) higher BMI were 1.00 (95% CI, 0.96 to 1.04) and 1.01 (95% CI, 0.98 to 1.04) for WC 70 and 100 cm, respectively. In men, a 10-cm higher WC was associated with 16% and 18% higher rates for BMI 25 and 30 kg/m(2), respectively; a 1 kg/m(2) higher BMI was associated with 4% higher HF rates regardless of WC. CONCLUSIONS: Strength of the association between BMI and HF events declined with age. In women, higher WC was associated with HF at all levels of BMI. Both BMI and WC were predictors among men.
PubMed ID
19808341 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking frequency in relation to subsequent changes in waist circumference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87026
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Apr;87(4):957-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tolstrup Janne S
Halkjaer Jytte
Heitmann Berit L
Tjønneland Anne M
Overvad Kim
Sørensen Thorkild I A
Grønbaek Morten N
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol Research, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. jst@niph.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Apr;87(4):957-63
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - metabolism
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - metabolism
Body mass index
Body Size
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies have reported a lower prevalence of abdominal obese persons among frequent drinkers than among nonfrequent drinkers. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that drinking frequency is associated with subsequent changes in waist circumference. DESIGN: Data come from a prospective cohort study conducted in 1993-1997 (baseline) and 1999-2002 (follow-up) and included 43 543 men and women. Baseline information on alcohol drinking frequency was related to 1) change in waist circumference by linear regression and 2) major gain and major loss in waist circumference (defined as waist change in the lowest or highest quintile of waist changes) by polytomous logistic regression, also taking into account amount of alcohol intake. RESULTS: Drinking frequency was inversely associated with changes in waist circumference in women and was unassociated with changes in waist circumference in men. Drinking frequency was unassociated with major waist loss but was inversely associated with major waist gain: odds ratios among men were 0.97 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.28), 0.95 (95% CI: 0.81, 1.12), 0.88 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.99), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.71, -0.95), and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.9) for never drinking, drinking on 1, 2-4, 5-6, and 7 d/wk, respectively, compared with men who drank alcohol on
PubMed ID
18400719 View in PubMed
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Allostatic load and clinical risk as related to sense of coherence in middle-aged women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80436
Source
Psychosom Med. 2006 Sep-Oct;68(5):801-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lindfors Petra
Lundberg Olle
Lundberg Ulf
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University and Centre for Health Equity Studies, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, SE 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. pls@psychology.su.se
Source
Psychosom Med. 2006 Sep-Oct;68(5):801-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aging - psychology
Attitude
Blood pressure
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Menopause
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Personal Satisfaction
Physical Examination
Questionnaires
Risk
Stress - epidemiology - psychology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate how physiologic dysregulation, in terms of allostatic load and clinical risk, respectively, relates to sense of coherence (SOC) in women with no previously diagnosed pathology. METHODS: At baseline, 200 43-year-old women took part in a standardized medical health examination and completed a 3-item measure of SOC, which they completed again 6 years later. According to data from the medical examination, two different measures of physiologic dysregulation were calculated: a) a measure of allostatic load based on empirically derived cut points and b) a measure of clinical risk based on clinically significant cut points. RESULTS: In line with the initial hypotheses, allostatic load was found to predict future SOC, whereas clinical risk did not. In addition to baseline SOC and nicotine consumption, allostatic load was strongly associated with a weak SOC at the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The better predictive value of allostatic load to clinical risk indicates that focusing solely on clinical risk obscures patterns of physiologic dysregulation that influence future SOC.
PubMed ID
17012536 View in PubMed
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