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[Abdominal obesity and associated comorbidities among primary care patients]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96760
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 May 24;172(21):1586-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-2010
Author
Ketil Haugan
Dan Rost
Nils Knudsen
Leif Breum
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk Afdeling, Roskilde Sygehus, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. ketilhaugan@hotmail.com
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 May 24;172(21):1586-91
Date
May-24-2010
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Dyslipidemias - etiology
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Primary Health Care
Waist Circumference
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Abdominal obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia and hypertension. The prevalence of abdominal obesity and its relationship with these comorbidities have not previously been examined in Danish primary care patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The IDEA study was an international cross sectional study including 168,159 patients worldwide. In Denmark, 47 randomly selected general practitioners included 847 consecutive patients. Age, gender, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI) and the presence of known comorbidities were recorded for all patients. RESULTS: The prevalence of abdominal obesity (waist circumference = 80 cm for women and = 94 cm for men) was 66% among women and 60% among men. There was a significant relationship between the degree of abdominal obesity and the prevalence of diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension for both sexes. There was a trend towards an increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease with increased waist circumference. CONCLUSION: Abdominal obesity is very frequently found in Danish primary care patients, and it is associated with an increased prevalence of diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Patients with increased waist circumference should be screened to diagnose comorbidities related to the abdominal obesity.
PubMed ID
20525471 View in PubMed
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Absence of association between the INSIG2 gene polymorphism (rs7566605) and obesity in the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95295
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Jul;17(7):1453-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Vimaleswaran Karani S
Franks Paul W
Brage Soren
Sardinha Luis B
Andersen Lars B
Wareham Nicholas J
Ekelund Ulf
Loos Ruth J F
Author Affiliation
MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge, UK.
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Jul;17(7):1453-7
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Estonia
Europe
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - genetics
Lipids - blood
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Obesity - blood - ethnology - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Waist Circumference - genetics
Abstract
The first genome-wide association study for BMI identified a polymorphism, rs7566605, 10 kb upstream of the insulin-induced gene 2 (INSIG2) transcription start site, as the most significantly associated variant in children and adults. Subsequent studies, however, showed inconsistent association of this polymorphism with obesity traits. This polymorphism has been hypothesized to alter INSIG2 expression leading to inhibition of fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis. Hence, we investigated the association of the INSIG2 rs7566605 polymorphism with obesity- and lipid-related traits in Danish and Estonian children (930 boys and 1,073 girls) from the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS), a school-based, cross-sectional study of pre- and early pubertal children. The association between the polymorphism and obesity traits was tested using additive and recessive models adjusted for age, age-group, gender, maturity and country. Interactions were tested by including the interaction terms in the model. Despite having sufficient power (98%) to detect the previously reported effect size for association with BMI, we did not find significant effects of rs7566605 on BMI (additive, P = 0.68; recessive, P = 0.24). Accordingly, the polymorphism was not associated with overweight (P = 0.87) or obesity (P = 0.34). We also did not find association with waist circumference (WC), sum of four skinfolds, or with total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, or high-density lipoprotein. There were no gender-specific (P = 0.55), age-group-specific (P = 0.63) or country-specific (P = 0.56) effects. There was also no evidence of interaction between genotype and physical activity (P = 0.95). Despite an adequately powered study, our findings suggest that rs7566605 is not associated with obesity-related traits and lipids in the EYHS.
PubMed ID
19197262 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the Baltic Sea diet consumed in the Nordic countries is associated with lower abdominal obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124508
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):520-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2013
Author
Noora Kanerva
Niina E Kaartinen
Ursula Schwab
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Satu Männistö
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, FI-00270 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):520-8
Date
Feb-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Baltic States
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Quality
Food Supply
Health promotion
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
North Sea
Nutrition Policy
Obesity, Abdominal - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Waist Circumference - ethnology
Abstract
Due to differences in food cultures, dietary quality measures, such as the Mediterranean Diet Score, may not be easily adopted by other countries. Recently, the Baltic Sea Diet Pyramid was developed to illustrate healthy choices for the diet consumed in the Nordic countries. We assessed whether the Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS) based on the Pyramid is associated with a decreased risk of obesity and abdominal obesity. The population-based cross-sectional study included 4720 Finns (25-74 years) from the National FINRISK 2007 study. Diet was assessed using a validated FFQ. The score included Nordic fruits and berries, vegetables, cereals, ratio of PUFA:SFA and trans-fatty acids, low-fat milk, fish, red and processed meat, total fat (percentage of energy), and alcohol. Height, weight and waist circumference (WC) were measured and BMI values were calculated. In a multivariable model, men in the highest v. lowest BSDS quintile were more likely to have normal WC (OR 0·48, 95 % CI 0·29, 0·80). In women, this association was similar but not significant (OR 0·65, 95 % CI 0·39, 1·09). The association appeared to be stronger in younger age groups (men: OR 0·23, 95 % CI 0·08, 0·62; women: OR 0·17, 95 % CI 0·05, 0·58) compared with older age groups. Nordic cereals and alcohol were found to be the most important BSDS components related to WC. No association was observed between the BSDS and BMI. The present study suggests that combination of Nordic foods, especially cereals and moderate alcohol consumption, is likely to be inversely associated with abdominal obesity.
PubMed ID
22575060 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue content of alpha-linolenic acid and the risk of ischemic stroke and ischemic stroke subtypes: A Danish case-cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297397
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0198927
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Christian Sørensen Bork
Stine Krogh Venø
Søren Lundbye-Christensen
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Anne Tjønneland
Philip C Calder
Kim Overvad
Erik Berg Schmidt
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0198927
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Chromatography, Gas
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Smoking
Stroke - classification - diagnosis - etiology
Waist Circumference
alpha-Linolenic Acid - analysis
Abstract
The plant-derived omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.
We have investigated associations between the content of ALA in adipose tissue and the risk of ischemic stroke and its subtypes.
Incident cases of ischemic stroke among participants enrolled into the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort (n = 57,053) were identified by linkage with the Danish National Patient Register. Subsequently, all potential cases were validated and classified into ischemic stroke subtypes. The fatty acid composition of adipose tissue was determined by gas chromatography in cases and in a randomly drawn sub-cohort (n = 3500). Statistical analyses were performed using weighted Cox regression.
During a median of 13.4 years of follow-up, 1735 cases of total ischemic stroke were identified including 297 cases of large artery atherosclerosis, 772 cases of small-vessel occlusion, 99 cases of cardio-embolism, 91 cases with stroke of other etiology and 476 cases with stroke of undetermined etiology. The median content of ALA in adipose tissue within the sub-cohort was 0.84% (95% central range: 0.53-1.19%). Multivariable analyses showed a U-shaped association between adipose tissue content of ALA and the rate of total ischemic stroke, but this association was not statistically significant (p = 0.172). In analyses of ischemic stroke subtypes, we observed a statistically significant U-shaped association between ALA and the rate of ischemic stroke due to large artery atherosclerosis (p = 0.017), whereas no appreciable association was observed between ALA and the rate of small-vessel occlusion (p = 0.427). A positive but statistically non-significant association was observed between ALA and the rate of ischemic stroke due to cardio-embolism (p = 0.162).
The content of ALA in adipose tissue was statistically non-significantly U-shaped associated with risk of total ischemic stroke. For ischemic stroke subtypes a statistically significant, U-shaped association with large artery atherosclerosis was observed.
PubMed ID
29889889 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue trans-fatty acids and changes in body weight and waist circumference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105926
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Apr 14;111(7):1283-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-2014
Author
Camilla P Hansen
Tina L Berentzen
Jane N Østergaard
Christina C Dahm
Lars I Hellgren
Erik B Schmidt
Anne Tjønneland
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Kim Overvad
Marianne U Jakobsen
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Apr 14;111(7):1283-91
Date
Apr-14-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue, White - metabolism
Biological Markers - metabolism
Biopsy, Needle
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dietary Fats - adverse effects - metabolism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Linoleic Acids, Conjugated - adverse effects - metabolism
Lost to Follow-Up
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - etiology - metabolism - pathology
Oleic Acids - adverse effects - metabolism
Questionnaires
Registries
Trans Fatty Acids - adverse effects - metabolism
Waist Circumference
Weight Gain
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that the intake of trans-fatty acids (TFA) plays a role in the development of obesity. The proportions of adipose tissue fatty acids not synthesised endogenously in humans, such as TFA, usually correlate well with the dietary intake. Hence, the use of these biomarkers may provide a more accurate measure of habitual TFA intake than that obtained with dietary questionnaires. The objective of the present study was to investigate the associations between the proportions of specific TFA in adipose tissue and subsequent changes in weight and waist circumference (WC). The relative content of fatty acids in adipose tissue biopsies from a random sample of 996 men and women aged 50-64 years drawn from a Danish cohort study was determined by GC. Baseline data on weight, WC and potential confounders were available together with information on weight and WC 5 years after enrolment. The exposure measures were total trans-octadecenoic acids (18:1t), 18:1 ?6-10t, vaccenic acid (18:1 ?11t) and rumenic acid (18:2 ?9c, 11t). Data were analysed using multiple regression with cubic spline modelling. The median proportion of total adipose tissue 18:1t was 1.52% (90% central range 0.98, 2.19) in men and 1.47% (1.01, 2.19) in women. No significant associations were observed between the proportions of total 18:1t, 18:1 ?6-10t, vaccenic acid or rumenic acid and changes in weight or WC. The present study suggests that the proportions of specific TFA in adipose tissue are not associated with subsequent changes in weight or WC within the exposure range observed in this population.
PubMed ID
24286469 View in PubMed
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Adiposity among children in Norway by urbanity and maternal education: a nationally representative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107305
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:842
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anna Biehl
Ragnhild Hovengen
Else-Karin Grøholt
Jøran Hjelmesæth
Bjørn Heine Strand
Haakon E Meyer
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P,O, Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway. anna.biehl@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:842
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mothers - education
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Pediatric Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Public Health
Risk assessment
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
International research has demonstrated that rural residency is a risk factor for childhood adiposity. The main aim of this study was to investigate the urban-rural gradient in overweight and obesity and whether the association differed by maternal education.
Height, weight and waist circumference (WC) were measured in a nationally representative sample of 3166 Norwegian eight-year-olds in 2010. Anthropometric measures were stratified by area of residence (urbanity) and maternal education. Risk estimates for overweight (including obesity) and waist-to-height ratio =0.5 were calculated by log-binomial regression.
Mean BMI and WC and risk estimates of overweight (including obesity) and waist-to-height ratio =0.5 were associated with both urbanity and maternal education. These associations were robust after mutual adjustment for each other. Furthermore, there was an indication of interaction between urbanity and maternal education, as trends of mean BMI and WC increased from urban to rural residence among children of low-educated mothers (p?=?0.01 for both BMI and WC), whereas corresponding trends for children from higher educational background were non-significant (p?>?0.30). However, formal tests of the interaction term urbanity by maternal education were non-significant (p-value for interaction was 0.29 for BMI and 0.31 for WC).
In this nationally representative study, children living rurally and children of low-educated mothers had higher mean BMI and waist circumference than children living in more urban areas and children of higher educated mothers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24028668 View in PubMed
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Adiposity and incidence of heart failure hospitalization and mortality: a population-based prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95071
Source
Circ Heart Fail. 2009 May;2(3):202-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Levitan Emily B
Yang Amy Z
Wolk Alicja
Mittleman Murray A
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Mass, USA. elevitan@bidmc.harvard.edu
Source
Circ Heart Fail. 2009 May;2(3):202-8
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Female
Heart Failure - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with heart failure (HF) incidence. We examined the strength of the association of body mass index (BMI) with HF by age and joint associations of BMI and waist circumference (WC). METHODS AND RESULTS: Women aged 48 to 83 (n=36873) and men aged 45 to 79 (n=43487) self-reported height, weight, and WC. HF hospitalization or death (n=382 women, 718 men) between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2004, was determined through administrative registers. Hazard ratios, from Cox proportional-hazards models, for an interquartile range higher BMI were 1.39 (95% CI, 1.15 to 1.68) at age 60 and 1.13 (95% CI, 1.02 to 1.27) at 75 in women. In men, hazard ratios were 1.54 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.73) at 60 and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.16 to 1.35) at 75. A 10-cm higher WC was associated with 15% (95% CI, 2% to 31%) and 18% (95% CI, 4% to 33%) higher HF rates among women with BMI 25 and 30 kg/m(2), respectively; hazard ratios for 1 kg/m(2) higher BMI were 1.00 (95% CI, 0.96 to 1.04) and 1.01 (95% CI, 0.98 to 1.04) for WC 70 and 100 cm, respectively. In men, a 10-cm higher WC was associated with 16% and 18% higher rates for BMI 25 and 30 kg/m(2), respectively; a 1 kg/m(2) higher BMI was associated with 4% higher HF rates regardless of WC. CONCLUSIONS: Strength of the association between BMI and HF events declined with age. In women, higher WC was associated with HF at all levels of BMI. Both BMI and WC were predictors among men.
PubMed ID
19808341 View in PubMed
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Adiposity measures as indicators of metabolic risk factors in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98426
Source
Obes Facts. 2009;2(5):294-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Martin Neovius
Sophia M Rossner
Karin Vågstrand
Yvonne Linné von Hausswolff-Juhlin
Johan Hoffstedt
Ulf Ekelund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. martin.neovius@ki.se
Source
Obes Facts. 2009;2(5):294-301
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body Composition
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - metabolism
Obesity - epidemiology - metabolism
Prevalence
ROC Curve
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Waist Circumference
Abstract
AIM: To examine the relation between adiposity assessment methods (percentage body fat (%BF), BMI, and waist circumference (WC)) and individual metabolic risk factors (f-insulin, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides) and a combined measure of metabolic risk. METHODS: Crosssectional study of 300 males (BMI 20.8 +/- 3.0 kg/m(2)) and females (BMI 21.3 +/- 2.9 kg/m(2)) 17 years of age. F-insulin and components of the metabolic syndrome defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) were used as metabolic risk indicators, with samples stratified into BMI, %BF, and WC groups, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy was expressed as the area under the ROC curve (AUC). RESULTS: In males, diagnostic accuracy for HDL and f-insulin was poor to fair for BMI (AUC 0.70, p = 0.001; 0.60, p = 0.22), WC (0.68, p = 0.003; 0.63, p = 0.11), and %BF (0.65, p = 0.009; 0.66, p = 0.04). The diagnostic accuracy for triglycerides was greater for all three measures (BMI 0.92, WC 0.95, %BF 0.87; all p or =2 metabolic risk factors (AUCs 0.76-0.91, p
PubMed ID
20057196 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences and the cardiovascular health of children: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105586
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2013;13:208
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Chelsea Pretty
Deborah D O'Leary
John Cairney
Terrance J Wade
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Brock University, St Catharines ON, Canada. twade@brocku.ca.
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2013;13:208
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disease Susceptibility
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Family Conflict
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - genetics
Income - statistics & numerical data
Life Change Events
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), such as abuse, household dysfunction, and neglect, have been shown to increase adults' risk of developing chronic conditions and risk factors for chronic conditions, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). Much less work has investigated the effect of ACEs on children's physical health status that may lead to adult chronic health conditions. Therefore, the present study examined the relationship between ACEs and early childhood risk factors for adult cardiovascular disease.
1 234 grade six to eight students participated in school-based data collection, which included resting measures of blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Parents of these children completed an inventory of ACEs taken from the Childhood Trust Events Survey. Linear regression models were used to assess the relationship between experiencing more than 4 ACEs experienced, systolic BP, HR, BMI and WC. In additional analysis, ACEs were assessed ordinally in their relationship with systolic BP, HR, and BMI as well as clinical obesity and hypertension status.
After adjustment for family education, income, age, sex, physical activity, and parental history of hypertension, and WC for HR models, four or more ACEs had a significant effect on HR (b = 1.8 bpm, 95% CI (0.1-3.6)) BMI (b =1.1 kg/m2, 95% CI (0.5-1.8)), and WC (b = 3.6 cm, 95% CI (1.8-5.3)). A dose-response relationship between ACE accumulation and both BMI and WC was also found to be significant. Furthermore, accumulation of 4 or more ACEs was significantly associated with clinical obesity (95th percentile), after controlling for the aforementioned covariates.
In a community sample of grade six to eight children, accumulation of 4 or more ACEs significantly increased BMI, WC and resting HR. Therefore, risk factors related to reported associations between ACEs and cardiovascular outcomes among adults are identifiable in childhood suggesting earlier interventions to reduce CVD risk are required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24344611 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness thresholds to define poor cardiometabolic health in children and youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299130
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Feb; 29(2):240-250
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Eivind Aadland
Sigmund Alfred Anderssen
Lars Bo Andersen
Geir Kåre Resaland
Elin Kolle
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sport, Food and Natural Sciences, Faculty of Education, Arts and Sports, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Sogndal, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Feb; 29(2):240-250
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Oxygen consumption
Reference Values
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Aerobic fitness is an apparent candidate for screening children and youth for poor cardiometabolic health and future risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Yet, age- and sex-specific cut points for children and youth determined using a maximal protocol and directly measured peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak ) does not exist. We used a nationally representative sample of 1462 Norwegian children and youth (788 boys and 674 girls aged 8.7-10.4 years and 14.7-16.7 years) who in 2005-2006 performed a maximal cycle ergometer test with direct measurement of VO2peak , along with measurement of several other risk factors for CVD (systolic blood pressure, waist circumference:height ratio, total:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, triglycerides, Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance). Based on the proportion of children having clustering (least favorable quartile) of 6 (1.6%), =5 (5.2%), and =4 (10.6%) CVD risk factors, we established the 2nd, 5th, and 10th percentile cut points for VO2peak (mL/kg/min) for children and youth aged 8-18 years. Classification accuracy was determined using the Kappa coefficient (k), sensitivity, and specificity. For boys, the 2nd, 5th, and 10th percentile VO2peak cut points were 33.6-36.4, 36.3-39.8, and 38.7-43.0 mL/kg/min, respectively. For girls, the corresponding cut points were 29.7-29.1, 32.4-31.4, and 34.8-33.5 mL/kg/min Together with BMI, but without more invasive measures of traditional risk factors for CVD, these cut points can be used to screen schoolchildren for poor cardiometabolic health with moderate discriminating ability (k = 0.53).
PubMed ID
30375665 View in PubMed
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