Skip header and navigation

Refine By

33 records – page 1 of 4.

American Indian and Alaska Native People: Social Vulnerability and COVID-19.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305158
Source
J Rural Health. 2021 01; 37(1):256-259
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2021

Are manual workers at higher risk of death than non-manual employees when living in Swedish municipalities with higher income inequality?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167962
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Apr;17(2):139-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Göran Henriksson
Peter Allebeck
Gunilla Ringbäck Weitoft
Dag Thelle
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Göteborg University SE 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. goran.henriksson@socmed.gu.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Apr;17(2):139-44
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Censuses
Employment - classification - economics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Occupations - classification - economics - statistics & numerical data
Poisson Distribution
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics - classification
Risk factors
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To test the hypothesis that manual workers are at higher risk of death than are non-manual employees when living in municipalities with higher income inequality.
Hierarchical regression was used for the analysis were individuals were nested within municipalities according to the 1990 Swedish census. The outcome was all-cause mortality 1992-1998. The income measure at the individual level was disposable family income weighted against composition of family; the income inequality measure used at the municipality level was the Gini coefficient.
The study population consisted of 1 578 186 people aged 40-64 years in the 1990 Swedish census, who were being reported as unskilled or skilled manual workers, lower-, intermediate-, or high-level non-manual employees.
There was no significant association between income inequality at the municipality level and risk of death, but an expected gradient with unskilled manual workers having the highest risk and high-level non-manual employees having the lowest. However, in the interaction models the relative risk (RR) of death for high-level non-manual employees was decreasing with increasing income inequality (RR = 0.77; 95% CI, 0.63-0.93), whereas the corresponding risk for unskilled manual workers increased with increasing income inequality (RR = 1.24; 95% CI, 1.06-1.46). The RRs for skilled manual, low- and medium- level non-manual employees were not significant. Controlling for income at the individual level did not substantially alter these findings, neither did potential confounders at the municipality level.
The findings suggest that there could be a differential impact from income inequality on risk of death, dependent on individuals' social position.
PubMed ID
16899476 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing capacity within a context of abuse or neglect.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151676
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2009 Apr;21(2):156-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Deborah O'Connor
Margaret Isabel Hall
Martha Donnelly
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Personhood in Dementia and School of Social Work, Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. deborah.oconnor@ubc.ca
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2009 Apr;21(2):156-69
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
British Columbia
Elder Abuse - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Self Care - methods
Spouse Abuse - psychology
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In 2000, with the implementation of Part III of the Adult Guardianship Act: Support and Assistance for Abused and Neglected Adults, British Columbia formally recognized the need to examine issues of decisional capacity of older adults within a context of abuse or neglect. Interestingly, however, although the test of capacity was clearly laid out under this piece of legislation, the potential influence that living in a situation of abuse or neglect may have on how the person makes decisions is not explicitly addressed. Similarly, this is a missing link throughout the literature discussing decisional capacity in older adults. This gap exists despite the fact that determining the "protection" needs of someone who is being abused and/or neglected often hinges directly on that person's decisional capacity. The purpose of this article is to examine the unique aspects associated with assessing and determining capacity for older adults who are living in a situation of abuse or neglect. The specific objectives are to: (a) examine how living in a situation of abuse or neglect may influence the determination of capacity and (b) explore the implications of conducting an assessment within a potentially abusive context. The legal notion of undue influence and the psychological concept of relational connection are introduced as potentially important for considering decision making within this context.
PubMed ID
19347716 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between social position and self-rated health in 10 deprived neighbourhoods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267779
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Carsten Kronborg Bak
Pernille Tanggaard Andersen
Unni Dokkedal
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:14
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Female
Health status
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Self Report
Social Class
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A number of studies have shown that poor self-rated health is more prevalent among people in poor, socially disadvantaged positions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between self-rated health and social position in 10 deprived neighbourhoods.
A stratified random sample of 7,934 households was selected. Of these, 641 were excluded from the study because the residents had moved, died, or were otherwise unavailable. Of the net sample of 7,293 individuals, 1,464 refused to participate, 885 were not at home, and 373 did not participate for other reasons, resulting in an average response rate of 62.7%. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations between the number of life resources and the odds of self-rated health and also between the type of neighbourhood and the odds of self-rated health.
The analysis shows that the number of life resources is significantly associated with having poor/very poor self-rated health for both genders. The results clearly suggest that the more life resources that an individual has, the lower the risk is of that individual reporting poor/very poor health.
The results show a strong association between residents' number of life resources and their self-rated health. In particular, residents in deprived rural neighbourhoods have much better self-rated health than do residents in deprived urban neighbourhoods, but further studies are needed to explain these urban/rural differences and to determine how they influence health.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2007;35(1):39-4717366086
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2007 Apr;36(2):348-5517182634
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 Nov;65(9):1825-3817706331
Cites: Health Place. 2011 Jan;17(1):311-921159541
Cites: Health Place. 2011 Jan;17(1):361-921177136
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2001 May;52(10):1501-1611314847
Cites: Int J Health Serv. 1996;26(3):507-198840199
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1997 Mar;17(3):513-99102170
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1997 Mar;38(1):21-379097506
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1997;18:341-789143723
Cites: Health Educ Res. 1997 Sep;12(3):385-9710174221
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1998 Feb;27(1):33-409563691
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2005 Apr;60(7):1557-6915652687
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2006 Apr;62(7):1768-8416226363
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2006 Nov;63(10):2604-1616920241
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2000 Nov;90(11):1694-811076232
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jul;55(1):125-3912137182
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2001 Summer;23(3):177-8511495218
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2001 Sep;42(3):258-7611668773
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Feb;56(4):769-8412560010
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Mar;56(6):1139-5312600354
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(2):126-3612745763
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Jun;32(3):357-6612777420
Cites: Milbank Q. 2004;82(1):5-9915016244
PubMed ID
25605136 View in PubMed
Less detail

A better start for health equity? Qualitative content analysis of implementation of extended postnatal home visiting in a disadvantaged area in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296200
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2018 04 10; 17(1):42
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-10-2018
Author
Madelene Barboza
Asli Kulane
Bo Burström
Anneli Marttila
Author Affiliation
Equity and Health Policy Research Group, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, SE 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. madelene.barboza@ki.se.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2018 04 10; 17(1):42
Date
04-10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Child
Child Health - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Equity - organization & administration
Health Surveys
House Calls - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Maternal-Child Health Services - organization & administration
Postnatal Care - standards
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Health inequities among children in Sweden persist despite the country's well-developed welfare system and near universal access to the national child health care programme. A multisectoral extended home visiting intervention, based on the principles of proportionate universalism, has been carried out in a disadvantaged area since 2013. The present study investigates the content of the meetings between families and professionals during the home visits to gain a deeper understanding of how it relates to a health equity perspective on early childhood development.
Three child health care nurses documented 501 visits to the families of 98 children between 2013 and 2016. A qualitative data-driven conventional content analysis was performed on all data from the cycle of six visits per child, and a general content model was developed. Additional content analysis was carried out on the data from visits to families who experienced adverse situations or greater needs.
The analysis revealed that the home visits covered three main categories of content related to the health, care and development of the child; the strengthening of roles and relations within the new family unit; and the influence and support located in the broader external context around the family. The model of categories and sub-categories proved stable over all six visits. Families with extra needs received continuous attention to their additional issues during the visits, as well as the standard content described in the content model.
This study on home visiting implementation indicates that the participating families received programme content which covered all the domains of nurturing care as recommended by the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health and recent research. The content of the home visits can be understood to create enabling conditions for health equity effects. The intervention can be seen to represent a practical example of proportionate universalism.
Notes
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011 Oct 20;11:821 PMID 22014291
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Jan 28;17 (1):91 PMID 28129751
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010 May;164(5):412-8 PMID 20439791
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2007 Mar-Apr;48(3-4):355-91 PMID 17355402
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Jan 8;320(7227):114-6 PMID 10625273
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(5):e36915 PMID 22629341
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Jun;61(6):473-8 PMID 17496254
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1996 Dec;35(12):1665-72 PMID 8973074
Cites: Lancet. 2017 Jan 7;389(10064):77-90 PMID 27717614
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2010 Apr;64(4):284-91 PMID 19692738
Cites: Child Care Health Dev. 2014 May;40(3):435-40 PMID 23909646
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1277-88 PMID 16204405
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Oct 06;14:1040 PMID 25287010
Cites: Health Soc Care Community. 2007 Jan;15(1):77-85 PMID 17212628
Cites: Lancet. 2017 Jan 7;389(10064):91-102 PMID 27717615
Cites: Lancet. 2017 Jan 7;389(10064):103-118 PMID 27717610
Cites: Int J Equity Health. 2015 Sep 15;14:81 PMID 26369339
Cites: J Paediatr Child Health. 2010 Nov;46(11):627-35 PMID 20796183
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Feb;104 Suppl 1:S136-43 PMID 24354833
Cites: Child Dev. 2004 Sep-Oct;75(5):1435-56 PMID 15369524
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2015 Jan;52(1):465-80 PMID 25304286
PubMed ID
29636071 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bicycle helmet use and bicycling-related injury among young Canadians: an equity analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112546
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2013;12:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Colleen M Davison
Michael Torunian
Patricia Walsh
Wendy Thompson
Steve McFaull
William Pickett
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada. davisonc@queensu.ca
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2013;12:48
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicycling - injuries - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Head Protective Devices - utilization
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Cycling is a major activity for adolescents in Canada and potential differences exist in bicycling-related risk and experience of injury by population subgroup. The overall aim of this study was to inform health equity interventions by profiling stratified analytic methods and identifying potential inequities associated with bicycle-related injury and the use of bicycle helmets among Canadian youth. The two objectives of this study were: (1) To examine national patterns in bicycle ridership and also bicycle helmet use among Canadian youth in a stratified analysis by potentially vulnerable population subgroups, and (2) To examine bicycling-related injury in the same population subgroups of Canadian youth in order to identify possible health inequities.
Data for this study were obtained from the 6th cycle (2009/10) of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study, which is a general health survey that was completed by 26,078 students in grades 6-10 from 436 Canadian schools. Based on survey responses, we determined point prevalence for bicycle ridership, bicycle helmet use and relative risks for bicycling-related injury.
Three quarters of all respondents were bicycle riders (n=19,410). Independent factors associated with bicycle ridership among students include being male, being a younger student, being more affluent, and being a resident of a small town. Among bicycle riders, 43% (95%CI ± 0.6%) reported never wearing and 32% (± 0.6%) inconsistently wearing a helmet. Only 26% (± 0.5%) of students reported always wearing a bicycle helmet. Helmets were less frequently used among older students and there were also important patterns by sex, geographic location and socioeconomic status. Adjusting for all other demographic characteristics, boys reported 2.02-fold increase (95% CI: 1.61 to 1.90) and new immigrants a 1.35-fold increase (95%CI: 1.00 to1.82) in the relative risk of bicycling-related injury in the past 12 months, as compared to girls and students born in Canada. The relative risk of injury did not vary significantly by levels of socioeconomic status.
Troubling disparities exist in bicycle use, bicycle helmet use and bicycling-related injuries across specific population subgroups. Bicycle safety and injury prevention initiatives should be informed by disaggregated analyses and the context of bicycle-related health differences should be further examined.
Notes
Cites: J Sch Health. 2009 Apr;79(4):169-7619292849
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(3):CD00540118646128
Cites: Brain Inj. 2008 Jun;22(6):501-718465391
Cites: Inj Prev. 2001 Sep;7(3):228-3011565990
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2001 Jul;55(7):450-111413171
Cites: J Urban Health. 2012 Feb;89(1):138-5222173474
Cites: Pediatrics. 2002 Nov;110(5):e6012415066
Cites: Pediatrics. 2003 Sep;112(3 Pt 1):e192-612949311
Cites: Traffic Inj Prev. 2003 Dec;4(4):285-9014630577
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 2004 Apr;89(4):330-515033841
Cites: J Trauma. 1991 Nov;31(11):1510-61942172
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Oct 10;305(6858):881-21422407
Cites: J Trauma. 1993 Jun;34(6):834-44; discussion 844-58315679
Cites: Inj Prev. 1997 Mar;3(1):38-429113846
Cites: J Emerg Nurs. 1997 Oct;23(5):417-99369604
Cites: Inj Prev. 1998 Jun;4(2):126-319666367
Cites: Inj Prev. 1998 Dec;4(4):280-39887419
Cites: Inj Prev. 2006 Aug;12(4):231-516887944
Cites: Inj Prev. 2006 Aug;12(4):262-516887950
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011;(11):CD00398522071810
Cites: Inj Prev. 2011 Jun;17(3):21521561881
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2011 Mar-Apr;102(2):134-821608386
PubMed ID
23819527 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can we disentangle life course processes of accumulation, critical period and social mobility? An analysis of disadvantaged socio-economic positions and myocardial infarction in the Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53415
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2004 Apr;58(8):1555-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Johan Hallqvist
John Lynch
Mel Bartley
Thierry Lang
David Blane
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm 171 76, Sweden. johan.hallqvist@phs.ki.se
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2004 Apr;58(8):1555-62
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Occupations - classification
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Mobility
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The accumulation hypothesis would propose that the longer the duration of exposure to disadvantaged socio-economic position, the greater the risk of myocardial infarction. However there may be a danger of confounding between accumulation and possibly more complex combinations of critical periods of exposure and social mobility. The objective of this paper is to investigate the possibility of distinguishing between these alternatives. We used a population based case-control study (Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Programme) of all incident first events of myocardial infarction among men and women, living in the Stockholm region 1992-94. The analyses were restricted to men 53-70 years, 511 cases and 716 controls. From a full occupational history each subject was categorized as manual worker or non-manual at three stages of the life course, childhood (from parent's occupation), at the ages 25-29 and 51-55, resulting in 8 possible socio-economic trajectories. We found a graded response to the accumulation of disadvantaged socio-economic positions over the life course. However, we also found evidence for effects of critical periods and of social mobility. A conceptual analysis showed that there are, for theoretical reasons, only a limited number of trajectories available, too small to form distinct empirical categories of each hypothesis. The empirical task of disentangling the life course hypotheses of critical period, social mobility and accumulation is therefore comparable to the problem of separating age, period, and cohort effects. Accordingly, the interpretation must depend on prior knowledge of more specific causal mechanisms.
PubMed ID
14759698 View in PubMed
Less detail

Challenges in conducting mHealth research with underserved populations: Lessons learned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283746
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2016 Oct;22(7):436-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Lonnie A Nelson
Anna Zamora-Kapoor
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2016 Oct;22(7):436-40
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Biomedical Research - methods
Cell Phones - utilization
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Mobile Applications - utilization
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telemedicine - methods
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Washington
Abstract
Previous studies have recognized the potential of mobile technology to improve health outcomes among underserved populations, but the challenges in conducting research into the use of mobile technology to improve health (mHealth) are not well understood. This manuscript identifies some of the most important challenges in conducting mHealth research with a sample of urban American Indian and Alaska Native mothers. We examined these challenges through an existing partnership with a community health agency. We conducted community consultations and a process monitoring phase for a pilot trial aimed at measuring the effect of a brief counselling session on participants' adherence to use of a mobile app. We identify generalizable challenges in administrative, technological, and logistical domains that will be useful foreknowledge to other investigators planning to conduct mHealth research with underserved populations.
PubMed ID
26468214 View in PubMed
Less detail

Closing the health equity gap: evidence-based strategies for primary health care organizations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119912
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Annette J Browne
Colleen M Varcoe
Sabrina T Wong
Victoria L Smye
Josée Lavoie
Doreen Littlejohn
David Tu
Olive Godwin
Murry Krause
Koushambhi B Khan
Alycia Fridkin
Patricia Rodney
John O'Neil
Scott Lennox
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, School of Nursing, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. annette.browne@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:59
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Evidence-Based Practice
Female
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
International evidence shows that enhancement of primary health care (PHC) services for disadvantaged populations is essential to reducing health and health care inequities. However, little is known about how to enhance equity at the organizational level within the PHC sector. Drawing on research conducted at two PHC Centres in Canada whose explicit mandates are to provide services to marginalized populations, the purpose of this paper is to discuss (a) the key dimensions of equity-oriented services to guide PHC organizations, and (b) strategies for operationalizing equity-oriented PHC services, particularly for marginalized populations.
The PHC Centres are located in two cities within urban neighborhoods recognized as among the poorest in Canada. Using a mixed methods ethnographic design, data were collected through intensive immersion in the Centres, and included: (a) in-depth interviews with a total of 114 participants (73 patients; 41 staff), (b) over 900 hours of participant observation, and (c) an analysis of key organizational documents, which shed light on the policy and funding environments.
Through our analysis, we identified four key dimensions of equity-oriented PHC services: inequity-responsive care; trauma- and violence-informed care; contextually-tailored care; and culturally-competent care. The operationalization of these key dimensions are identified as 10 strategies that intersect to optimize the effectiveness of PHC services, particularly through improvements in the quality of care, an improved 'fit' between people's needs and services, enhanced trust and engagement by patients, and a shift from crisis-oriented care to continuity of care. Using illustrative examples from the data, these strategies are discussed to illuminate their relevance at three inter-related levels: organizational, clinical programming, and patient-provider interactions.
These evidence- and theoretically-informed key dimensions and strategies provide direction for PHC organizations aiming to redress the increasing levels of health and health care inequities across population groups. The findings provide a framework for conceptualizing and operationalizing the essential elements of equity-oriented PHC services when working with marginalized populations, and will have broad application to a wide range of settings, contexts and jurisdictions. Future research is needed to link these strategies to quantifiable process and outcome measures, and to test their impact in diverse PHC settings.
Notes
Cites: J Health Polit Policy Law. 2006 Feb;31(1):11-3216484666
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Dec;37(4):16-3716541817
Cites: ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2006 Oct-Dec;29(4):324-3917135801
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 May;64(10):2165-7617395350
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Jan 2;299(1):70-818167408
Cites: Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Feb;19(1):4-1018226520
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2008 Apr;76(2):194-20718377117
Cites: Ethn Health. 2008 Apr;13(2):109-2718425710
Cites: J Pain. 2008 Nov;9(11):1049-5718701353
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(11):1852-6018926612
Cites: Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2009;6:Article219222394
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2009 Mar;19(3):297-31119224874
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 May;68(9):1659-6619286294
Cites: BMC Med Educ. 2009;9:3419575776
Cites: Pain Med. 2009 May-Jun;10(4):739-4719453953
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2009 Nov;99(11):1967-7419762660
Cites: ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2009 Oct-Dec;32(4):282-9419934835
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:6520226084
Cites: Int J Drug Policy. 2010 Jul;21(4):321-920116989
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2010 Aug;71(4):717-2420554364
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2011 Mar;21(3):333-4821075979
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2011 Aug;65(8):656-6019933684
Cites: Can Public Policy. 2011;37(3):359-8022175082
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Apr;56(7):1453-6812614697
Cites: ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2002 Sep;25(1):1-1712889574
Cites: Dev World Bioeth. 2004 May;4(1):76-9515086375
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2004 Dec;14(10):1366-8615538005
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S45-6116078555
Cites: Milbank Q. 2005;83(3):457-50216202000
PubMed ID
23061433 View in PubMed
Less detail

De-insurance in Ontario has reduced use of eye care services by the socially disadvantaged.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123561
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2012 Jun;47(3):203-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Ya-Ping Jin
Yvonne M Buys
Wendy Hatch
Graham E Trope
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. yaping.jin@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2012 Jun;47(3):203-10
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Health Services - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Insurance Coverage
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Ontario
Ophthalmology - statistics & numerical data
Optometry - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - utilization
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Effective November 1, 2004, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care de-insured, or delisted, routine eye examinations for Ontarians aged 20 to 64 years. We examined whether this delisting reduced Ontarians' access to eye care providers (ophthalmologists and optometrists).
Cross-sectional survey.
Ontario respondents to the Canadian Community Health Survey in 2000/2001 (n = 39 234 before delisting) and 2007/2008 (n = 43 835 after delisting).
We compared utilization rates of eye care providers by Ontarians in a 12-month period in 2000/2001 to utilization rates in 2007/2008 using self-reported data.
Among Ontarians aged 40 to 64 years, utilization was significantly reduced (-7.2%, p 0.05) by those who had completed secondary school or higher education. A reduction of -5.4% was observed among Ontarians in the lowest income quintile in contrast to increased utilization in all other income groups (p > 0.05). Before delisting, the gap in utilization between people with and without a secondary school graduation certificate was 4.7%. This gap doubled to 11.2% after delisting (p 0.05). Cost was the likely barrier that resulted in this finding.
The use of eye care providers among socially disadvantaged Ontarians decreased significantly after vision care services were delisted. The effects of delisting appear to have caused an inequity in access to eye care providers, and that contradicts the objectives of the Canada Health Act.
PubMed ID
22687293 View in PubMed
Less detail

33 records – page 1 of 4.