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[Information hygiene and regulation of information for vulnerable groups of the population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263388
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Sep-Oct;(5):43-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
E I Denisov
A L Eremin
O V Sivochalova
N N Kurerov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Sep-Oct;(5):43-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Human Rights - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Humans
Hygiene - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Information Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Internet - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Vulnerable Populations - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
Development of information society engenders the problem of hygienic regulation of information load for the population, first of all for vulnerable groups. There are presented international and Russian normative legal documents and experience in this area, there are described the negative effects of information (such as stress, depression, suicidal ideations). There are considered social-psychological characteristics of vulnerable groups that requires their best protection from loads of information, doing harm, particularly in terms of reproductive health, family relationships, children, etc. There was noted the desirability of improvement of sanitary, legislation on the regulation of the information load on the population, especially in vulnerable groups, in terms of optimization of parameters of the signal-carriers on volume, brightness and the adequacy of the volume and content of information in radio and television broadcasting, in an urban environment and at the plant to preserve the health and well-being of the population.
PubMed ID
25831927 View in PubMed
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Swedish legal scholarship concerning protection of vulnerable groups: Therapeutic and proactive dimensions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140329
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2010 Nov-Dec;33(5-6):398-405
Publication Type
Article
Author
Moa Kindström Dahlin
Pernilla Leviner
Anna Kaldal
Clara Hellner Gumpert
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, Stockholm University, Sweden. moa.kindstrom-dahlin@juridicum.su.se
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2010 Nov-Dec;33(5-6):398-405
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Expert Testimony - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Mentally Ill Persons - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Personal Autonomy
Social Welfare
Sweden
Vulnerable Populations - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
This paper presents a brief overview of the legal theoretical problems that arise in connection with the societal ambition of protecting vulnerable groups. One of the central difficulties in legislation with proactive and therapeutic ambitions arises from the link between law and philosophy of science, i.e., the relationship between facts and norms. It is shown that Therapeutic Jurisprudence differs in several aspects from Swedish legal scholarship that follows Scandinavian Legal Realism. It is also demonstrated that Therapeutic Jurisprudence has several similarities with the so-called Proactive Approach. This paper suggests that Therapeutic Jurisprudence may serve as a useful legal theoretical perspective in Swedish legal scholarship, especially when studying complex and vague regulations with a future focus. Two examples from Swedish legislation are examined: (a) Laws regulating compulsory care of abused or neglected children, and (b) laws related to the mentally ill. This paper illustrates the complexity in these acts, and poses the question of whether the regulations serve their purpose of providing adequate care for and protection of those in need.
PubMed ID
20889208 View in PubMed
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That's what friends are for: how intergroup friendships promote historically disadvantaged groups' substantive political representation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294351
Source
Br J Sociol. 2017 Dec; 68(4):693-717
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Andrej Kokkonen
David Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Aarhus University.
Source
Br J Sociol. 2017 Dec; 68(4):693-717
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Female
Friends
Group Processes
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Politics
Sweden
Vulnerable Populations - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
The interests of historically disadvantaged groups risk being overlooked if they are not present in the decision-making process. However, a mere presence in politics does not guarantee political success. Often groups need allies to promote their interests successfully. We argue that one way to identify such allies is to judge politicians by whether they have friends in historically disadvantaged groups, as intergroup friendships have been shown to make people understand and feel empathy for outgroups. In other words, intergroup friendships may function as an important complement to descriptive representation. We test our argument with a unique survey that asks all elected political representatives in Sweden's 290 municipalities (response rate 79 per cent) about their friendship ties to, and their representation of, five historically disadvantaged groups: women, immigrants, youths, pensioners and blue-collar workers. We find a strong correlation between representatives' friendship ties to these groups and their commitment to represent them. The correlation is especially strong for youths and blue-collar workers, which likely can be explained by the fact that these groups usually lack crucial political resources (such as experience and education). We conclude that friendship ties function as an important complement to descriptive representation for achieving substantive representation.
PubMed ID
28510354 View in PubMed
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