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Reciprocity, qualitative research and vulnerable cancer populations: an opinion piece.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128236
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2011;21(4):200-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Dauna L Crooks
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2011;21(4):200-4
Date
2011
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical research
Canada
Humans
Neoplasms - physiopathology
Vulnerable Populations
PubMed ID
22216734 View in PubMed
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[Necessary to reduce ill health in vulnerable neighborhoods].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259452
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Sep 3-9;111(36):1454-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jan Halldin
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Sep 3-9;111(36):1454-5
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Urban health
Vulnerable Populations
PubMed ID
25325140 View in PubMed
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Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Vulnerable populations in the Arctic I nterest in the Arctic has grown significantly in recent years. The Arctic environment is unique and highly sensitive to disturbances. Temperatures have already risen twice as quickly in the Arctic as elsewhere on Earth. Glaciers and sea ice are melting
  1 document  
Author
Gustaf Lind
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:2
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
130491
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Conservation of Natural Resources
Humans
Vulnerable Populations
PubMed ID
22121342 View in PubMed
Documents

Lind-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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[Migration, ethics and public health in Quebec].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173895
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 2005 Apr;53(2):192-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
S. Gravel
J-M Brodeur
F. Champagne
B. Vissandjée
Author Affiliation
Candidate au doctorat, Programme de santé publique, Université de Montréal. Direction de santé publique de Montréal, 1301 Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, Québec H2L 1M3, Canada. sgravel@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 2005 Apr;53(2):192-204
Date
Apr-2005
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Emigration and Immigration
Ethics
Humans
Public Health
Quebec
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
This article analyses the ethical issues of migration in relation to public health in Quebec. There are two objectives: to describe the progression of analysis of the migration phenomenon in public health over the last thirty years and to state the ethical debate it raises. The progression of analysis of the migration phenomenon has been characterised by various approaches: intercultural, acculturation, transcultural, and migratory journey. Although these approaches have contributed to the development of knowledge about the reality of immigration, they have also, in spite of themselves, generated stigmatisation, discrimination and the proliferation of prejudices. Generally, findings that have emerged when migration is taken into account indicate an imbalance of power. For some, to focus on the phenomenon of migration promotes the power imbalance while for others, to disregard it masks the issue.
PubMed ID
16012377 View in PubMed
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[Establish social physician teams in vulnerable districts].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155624
Source
Lakartidningen. 2008 Jul 9-22;105(28-29):2032-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jan Halldin
Author Affiliation
jan.halldin@sll.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2008 Jul 9-22;105(28-29):2032-3
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - manpower
Humans
Physicians
Social Medicine
Sweden
Vulnerable Populations
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 2008 Jun 25-Jul 1;105(26-27):1908-918681368
PubMed ID
18710163 View in PubMed
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Responding to the World Report on Disability in Australia: lessons from collaboration in an urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander school.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119147
Source
Int J Speech Lang Pathol. 2013 Feb;15(1):69-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Bronwyn Davidson
Anne E Hill
Alison Nelson
Author Affiliation
The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. bronwynd@unimelb.edu.au
Source
Int J Speech Lang Pathol. 2013 Feb;15(1):69-74
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication Disorders - therapy
Health Services Accessibility - trends
Humans
Vulnerable Populations
World Health
Abstract
The timely release of the World Report on Disability serves as a challenge to members of the health professions to review and renew their response to inequity of access and provision of services to children and adults with a disability. This paper responds to the lead article by Wylie, McAllister, Davidson, and Marshall, and provides commentary on two of the recommendations of the World Report on Disability in the context of a novel inter-professional service for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children with communication and learning needs. Speech-language pathology and occupational therapy students reported on their learning within a model of service delivery based on partnership with an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander school community and inter-professional collaboration. Lessons learned have the potential to inform future services for under-served populations and to impact on capacity building through health professionals gaining experiential knowledge and understanding of an urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.
Notes
Comment On: Int J Speech Lang Pathol. 2013 Feb;15(1):1-1323323813
PubMed ID
23134085 View in PubMed
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The use of incentives in vulnerable populations for a telephone survey: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119644
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2012;5:572
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Megan Knoll
Lianne Soller
Moshe Ben-Shoshan
Daniel Harrington
Joey Fragapane
Lawrence Joseph
Sebastien La Vieille
Yvan St-Pierre
Kathi Wilson
Susan Elliott
Ann Clarke
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada. megan.knoll@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2012;5:572
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Motivation
Prevalence
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Poor response rates in prevalence surveys can lead to nonresponse bias thereby compromising the validity of prevalence estimates. We conducted a telephone survey of randomly selected households to estimate the prevalence of food allergy in the 10 Canadian provinces between May 2008 and March 2009 (the SCAAALAR study: Surveying Canadians to Assess the Prevalence of Common Food Allergies and Attitudes towards Food LAbeling and Risk). A household response rate of only 34.6% was attained, and those of lower socioeconomic status, lower education and new Canadians were underrepresented. We are now attempting to target these vulnerable populations in the SPAACE study (Surveying the Prevalence of Food Allergy in All Canadian Environments) and are evaluating strategies to increase the response rate. Although the success of incentives to increase response rates has been demonstrated previously, no studies have specifically examined the use of unconditional incentives in these vulnerable populations in a telephone survey. The pilot study will compare response rates between vulnerable Canadian populations receiving and not receiving an incentive.
Randomly selected households were randomly assigned to receive either a $5 incentive or no incentive. The between group differences in response rates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. The response rates for the incentive and non-incentive groups were 36.1% and 28.7% respectively, yielding a between group difference of 7.4% (-0.7%, 15.6%).
Although the wide CI precludes definitive conclusions, our results suggest that unconditional incentives are effective in vulnerable populations for telephone surveys.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23083313 View in PubMed
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"From your own thinking you can't help us": intercultural collaboration to address inequities in services for Indigenous Australians in response to the World Report on Disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119806
Source
Int J Speech Lang Pathol. 2013 Feb;15(1):101-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Anne Lowell
Author Affiliation
Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia. anne.lowell@cdu.edu.au
Source
Int J Speech Lang Pathol. 2013 Feb;15(1):101-5
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication Disorders - therapy
Health Services Accessibility - trends
Humans
Vulnerable Populations
World Health
Abstract
Inequity in service provision for Indigenous Australians with communication disability is an issue requiring urgent attention. In the lead article, Wylie, McAllister, Davidson, and Marshall (2013) note that, even in the relatively affluent Minority World, including Australia, equity in service provision for people with communication disability has not been achieved. In remote communities in the Northern Territory (NT) almost all residents speak a language other than English as their primary language. However, there are no speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in the NT who speak an Indigenous language or who share their cultural background. Specific data on the prevalence of communication disability in this population are unavailable due to a range of factors. The disability data that are available, for example, demonstrating the high level of conductive hearing loss, indicates that the risk of communication disability in this population is particularly high. Change is urgently needed to address current inequities in both availability of, and access to, culturally responsive services for Indigenous people with communication disability. Such change must engage Indigenous people in a collaborative process that recognizes their expertise in identifying both their needs and the most effective form of response to these needs.
Notes
Comment On: Int J Speech Lang Pathol. 2013 Feb;15(1):1-1323323813
PubMed ID
23072499 View in PubMed
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The role of ethical guidelines in the delivery of frontline mental health and addictions programming in Canadian indigenous communities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96066
Source
Page 373 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
, potential harm to vulnerable populations would decrease, and higher levels of trust between government health ministries and Aboriginal peoples at all level of program delivery would be achieved. Contact Caroline Tait (carol1ne tait@usask ca)
  1 document  
Author
Tait, C.
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan
Source
Page 373 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Ethically based healthcare policy and programming
First Nations
Northern Saskatchewan
Vulnerable Populations
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 9. Indigenous Health and Wellbeing.
Documents
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Unaccompanied refugee children--vulnerability and agency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114955
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Jul;102(7):666-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Ketil Eide
Anders Hjern
Author Affiliation
Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Jul;102(7):666-8
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Humans
Mental health
Norway
Refugees - psychology
Sweden
United States
Vulnerable Populations - psychology
Abstract
The numbers of refugee adolescents that arrive in Europe without their families has increased in recent years, particularly in Sweden. Research has demonstrated that these children have high rates of mental health problems, particularly depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, during the first years after resettlement. Despite this, there are also indications that many of these unaccompanied children are resourceful and arrive with a clear vision of a positive future in the new country. Follow-up studies in the United States and Norway have indicated fairly good social outcomes in the long term.
The education and care that unaccompanied minors receive during the first years after resettlement, together with their own drive to create a positive future, are key factors in their mental health and long-term adjustment.
PubMed ID
23560773 View in PubMed
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354 records – page 1 of 36.