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[15th year of the Reach to Recovery Program in Russia: analysis of activity and evaluation of effectiveness (exemplified by the St. Petersburg experience)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168964
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2005;51(5):612-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005

The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104335
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2014;10:247-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Tatyana Y Kuznetsova
Viktoria A Korneva
Evgeniya N Bryantseva
Vitaliy S Barkan
Artemy V Orlov
Igor N Posokhov
Anatoly N Rogoza
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Petrozavodsk State University, Petrozavodsk, Russia.
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2014;10:247-51
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Algorithms
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Circadian Rhythm
Diastole
Female
Healthy Volunteers
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Pulse Wave Analysis - standards
Reference Values
Russia
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Systole
Time Factors
Vascular Stiffness
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects.
Notes
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Cites: Hypertension. 2013 Jun;61(6):1148-923630945
Cites: Hypertension. 2013 Jun;61(6):1168-7623630950
Cites: J Hypertens. 2013 Sep;31(9):1731-6824029863
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2010 Oct;31(19):2338-5020530030
PubMed ID
24812515 View in PubMed
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The 1999 National Caring Awards. Young adult awardees--Aubyn Burnside, Hickory, North Carolina.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198758
Source
Caring. 1999 Dec;18(12):42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999

The 1999 National Caring Awards. Young adult awardees--Craig Kielburger, Concord, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198759
Source
Caring. 1999 Dec;18(12):36-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Source
Can Nurse. 2002 Apr;98(4):6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Lois M Blais
Source
Can Nurse. 2002 Apr;98(4):6
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Hospital Volunteers
Humans
Nursing Care - methods
Retirement
PubMed ID
11989416 View in PubMed
Less detail

ADA working to bring volunteer dentists to Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175379
Source
J Mich Dent Assoc. 2005 Feb;87(2):16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005

Administrators of volunteer services: their needs for training and research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221883
Source
Nonprofit Manag Leadersh. 1992;2(3):271-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
J L Brudney
Author Affiliation
University of Georgia.
Source
Nonprofit Manag Leadersh. 1992;2(3):271-82
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - education - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Education, Continuing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Organizations, Nonprofit - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Research
United States
Volunteers - organization & administration
Abstract
Despite the importance of volunteer administrators to nonprofit and many government organizations, little systematic research has been focused on these officials. Using a large national survey of volunteer practitioners conducted in 1989-1990, this article examines empirically several hypotheses concerning organizational support to meet administrator needs for continuing education. Using the survey responses, the article also elaborates the subjects recommended by the administrators for treatment in a basic seminar in volunteer management, in an advanced seminar, and in further research.
PubMed ID
10117915 View in PubMed
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Adverse events associated with lay emergency response programs: the public access defibrillation trial experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168751
Source
Resuscitation. 2006 Jul;70(1):59-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Mary Ann Peberdy
Lois Van Ottingham
William J Groh
Jerris Hedges
Thomas E Terndrup
Ronald G Pirrallo
N Clay Mann
Ruchir Sehra
Author Affiliation
Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Box 908204, Richmond, VA 23298, USA. mpeberdy@aol.com
Source
Resuscitation. 2006 Jul;70(1):59-65
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - adverse effects - education - psychology
Community Health Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Defibrillators - adverse effects
Electric Countershock - adverse effects
Emergency Medical Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data
United States
Volunteers - education - psychology
Abstract
The adverse event (AE) profile of lay volunteer CPR and public access defibrillation (PAD) programs is unknown. We undertook to investigate the frequency, severity, and type of AE's occurring in widespread PAD implementation.
A randomized-controlled clinical trial.
One thousand two hundred and sixty public and residential facilities in the US and Canada.
On-site, volunteer, lay personnel trained in CPR only compared to CPR plus automated external defibrillators (AEDs).
Persons experiencing possible cardiac arrest receiving lay volunteer first response with CPR+AED compared with CPR alone.
An AE is defined as an event of significance that caused, or had the potential to cause, harm to a patient or volunteer, or a criminal act. AE data were collected prospectively.
Twenty thousand three hundred and ninety six lay volunteers were trained in either CPR or CPR+AED. One thousand seven hundred and sixteen AEDs were placed in units randomized to the AED arm. There were 26,389 exposure months. Only 36 AE's were reported. There were two patient-related AEs: both patients experienced rib fractures. There were seven volunteer-related AE's: one had a muscle pull, four experienced significant emotional distress and two reported pressure by their employee to participate. There were 27 AED-related AEs: 17 episodes of theft involving 20 devices, three involved AEDs that were placed in locations inaccessible to the volunteer, four AEDs had mechanical problems not affecting patient safety, and three devices were improperly maintained by the facility. There were no inappropriate shocks and no failures to shock when indicated (95% upper bound for probability of inappropriate shock or failure to shock = 0.0012).
AED use following widespread training of lay-persons in CPR and AED is generally safe for the volunteer and the patient. Lay volunteers may report significant, usually transient, emotional stress following response to a potential cardiac arrest. Within the context of this prospective, randomized multi-center study, AEDs have an exceptionally high safety profile when used by trained lay responders.
PubMed ID
16784998 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness is associated with low cardiovascular disease risk: the impact of lifestyle on early risk factors for atherosclerosis in young healthy Swedish individuals - the Lifestyle, Biomarker, and Atherosclerosis study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284719
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2017;13:91-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Maria Fernström
Ulrika Fernberg
Gabriella Eliason
Anita Hurtig-Wennlöf
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2017;13:91-99
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Biomarkers - blood
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Carotid Artery Diseases - blood - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - prevention & control
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dyslipidemias - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Exercise Test
Feeding Behavior
Hand Strength
Healthy Diet
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Muscle strength
Prevalence
Prognosis
Protective factors
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and atherosclerosis is slow and develops over decades. In the cross-sectional Swedish Lifestyle, Biomarker, and Atherosclerosis study, 834 young, self-reported healthy adults aged 18.0-25.9 years have been studied to identify early risk factors for atherosclerosis.
The aims of this study were to 1) assess selected cardiometabolic biomarkers, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) as a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, and lifestyle-related indicators (food habits, handgrip strength, and oxygen uptake, VO2 max); 2) analyze the associations between cIMT and lifestyle factors; and 3) identify subjects at risk of CVD using a risk score and to compare the characteristics of subjects with and without risk of CVD.
Blood samples were taken in a fasting state, and food habits were reported through a questionnaire. cIMT was measured by ultrasound, and VO2 max was measured by ergometer bike test. The risk score was calculated according to Wildman.
cIMT (mean ± standard deviation) was 0.50±0.06 mm, and VO2 max values were 37.8±8.5 and 42.9±9.9 mL/kg/min, in women and men, respectively. No correlation was found between aerobic fitness expressed as VO2 max (mL/kg/min) and cIMT. Using Wildman's definition, 12% of the subjects were classified as being at risk of CVD, and 15% had homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. A total of 35% of women and 25% of men had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol than recommended. Food habits did not differ between those at risk and those not at risk. However, aerobic fitness measured as VO2 max (mL/kg/min) differed; 47% of the subjects at risk had low aerobic fitness compared to 23% of the nonrisk subjects (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
28352184 View in PubMed
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Age and gender differences of endothelial function in 4739 healthy adults: the HUNT3 Fitness Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125745
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Aug;20(4):531-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Eli-Anne Skaug
Stian Thoresen Aspenes
Line Oldervoll
Bjørn Mørkedal
Lars Vatten
Ulrik Wisløff
Oyvind Ellingsen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Aug;20(4):531-40
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Brachial Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Chi-Square Distribution
Endothelium, Vascular - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Female
Health Surveys
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Hyperemia - physiopathology
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Physical Fitness
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Vasodilation
Young Adult
Abstract
Endothelial dysfunction is an important marker for prognosis in patients with coronary heart disease. However, there are no reference values for endothelial function in a healthy population. Our aim was to determine the distribution of flow-mediated dilation (FMD) values by gender and age in healthy adults.
FMD was measured by ultrasound during reactive hyperaemia in the brachial artery of 4739 adults aged 20-89 years, who were free from self-reported cardiovascular or pulmonary disease. Differences in FMD across age and gender were analysed by multiple linear regression.
Total mean ± SD FMD was 4.8 ± 4.2%, with corresponding estimates of 4.3 ± 3.9% for men and 5.3 ± 4.5% for women (p
PubMed ID
22456692 View in PubMed
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344 records – page 1 of 35.