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An exploratory study of associations between social capital and self-assessed health in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92026
Source
Health Econ Policy Law. 2008 Oct;3(Pt 4):349-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Iversen Tor
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Management and Health Economics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Tor.Iversen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Health Econ Policy Law. 2008 Oct;3(Pt 4):349-64
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Norway
Social Support
Voluntary Workers
Abstract
The objective of this study is to estimate associations between social capital and health when other factors are controlled for. Data from the standard-of-living survey by Statistics Norway are merged with data from several other sources. The merged files combine data at the individual level with data that describe indicators of community-level social capital related to each person's county of residence. Both cross-sectional and panel data are used. We find that one indicator of community-level social capital -- voting participation in local elections -- is positively associated with self-assessed health in the cross-sectional study and in the panel data study. While we find that religious activity at the community-level has a positive effect in the cross-sectional survey and no effect in the panel survey, we find that sports organizations have a negative effect on health in the cross-sectional survey and no effect in the panel survey. The question is raised whether the welfare state diminishes the effect of structural community social capital, as represented by voluntary organizations, on health.
PubMed ID
18793477 View in PubMed
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[Assistance by Red Cross volunters to the pediatrician-phthisiologist]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44612
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1968;46(2):8-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968

Caregiving and volunteering among older people in Sweden--prevalence and profiles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98296
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 2009 Oct-Dec;21(4):352-73
Publication Type
Article
Author
Magnus Jegermalm
Eva Jeppsson Grassman
Author Affiliation
Ersta Sköndal University College, Sköndal, Sweden. Magnus.jegermalm@esh.se
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 2009 Oct-Dec;21(4):352-73
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Population Dynamics
Social Planning
Social Support
Social Welfare - economics - trends
Sweden
Voluntary Health Agencies - organization & administration - trends
Voluntary Workers - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study examines the role of older people in Swedish society by exploring the prevalence of their informal caregiving and volunteering and by analyzing the profiles of these contributors of unpaid work. Data were collected by means of telephone interviews in a Swedish representative survey conducted in 2005. Our analysis reveals three distinct profiles of people involved in unpaid activities. One of these consists of those involved both in informal help giving and volunteering, a group that has been labeled "super helpers" or "doers" in earlier research. It is important for social policy planners to recognize these groups of older people and better understand the dynamics of their unpaid work in order to ascertain whether they might need support as providers and to enhance their well-being. There does not seem to be any simple contradiction between the parallel existence of a universal welfare model of the Swedish kind and an extensive civil society in which older people play important roles as active citizens.
PubMed ID
20092127 View in PubMed
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The Circle Model--support for relatives of people with dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72461
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 1998 Oct;13(10):674-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
W. Jansson
B. Almberg
M. Grafström
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 1998 Oct;13(10):674-81
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology
Christianity
Dementia
Female
Health education
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respite Care - methods
Self-Help Groups
Sweden
Voluntary Workers - education
Abstract
Home care for cognitively impaired elderly puts tremendous stress and burden on their families. Therefore it is important to search for effective care models in order to provide support for this group. In this study, an intervention model--the Circle Model--was developed, tested and evaluated in six places in Sweden. The model is unique in that family caregivers and volunteers were trained together in study circles. After their training, the volunteers replaced the caregivers in the homes on a regular basis, which permitted the caregivers some relief from the demands of caregiving. Interviews were conducted with the participants to gather information about their training and relief care experiences. The caregivers reported that the study circle provided opportunity to exchange experiences with other people in similar situations. They felt a spirit of community with other relatives, and were able to increase their knowledge in care providing and coping strategies. The emphasis in temporary relief care by the volunteers was placed on providing the relatives with feelings of security and relaxation. The satisfaction among the Circle Model participants was reciprocal. The volunteers also reported high satisfaction and appreciation of the knowledge which they acquired from the caregivers. The Circle Model brings new dimensions to the home care situation and should be seen as a complement to social services support.
PubMed ID
9818302 View in PubMed
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Coping strategies of relatives when an adult next-of-kin is recovering at home following critical illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70899
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2004 Oct;20(5):281-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Ingrid Johansson
Bengt Fridlund
Cathrine Hildingh
Author Affiliation
Intensive Care Clinic, Helsingborg Hospital Co., SE-251 87, Sweden. ingrid.j-son@telia.com
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2004 Oct;20(5):281-91
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Altruism
Attitude to Health
Convalescence - psychology
Cost of Illness
Critical Illness - psychology - rehabilitation
Family - psychology
Female
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Voluntary Workers - psychology
Abstract
The trend within the Swedish healthcare system is to reduce the duration of hospital care. This means that a patient who is discharged to their home after critical illness is highly likely to be functionally impaired, and therefore, requires care-giving assistance from a family member. The aim of this study was to generate a theoretical model with regard to relatives' coping when faced with the situation of having an adult next-of-kin recovering at home after critical illness. The design incorporated grounded theory methodology. Four coping strategies exhibiting different characteristics were identified: volunteering, accepting, modulating and sacrificing. Factors determining the choice of coping strategy were the physical and psychological status of the relative, previous experience of ICU-care and the psychological status of the patient. The theoretical model described in this article can contribute to expanding healthcare professionals' understanding of the coping strategies of relatives during recovery, but also provide inspiration for social action to be taken.
PubMed ID
15450617 View in PubMed
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Epidemiologic research on man-made disasters: strategies and implications of cohort definition for World Trade Center worker and volunteer surveillance program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93123
Source
Mt Sinai J Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;75(2):77-87
Publication Type
Article
Author
Savitz David A
Oxman Rachael T
Metzger Kristina B
Wallenstein Sylvan
Stein Diane
Moline Jacqueline M
Herbert Robin
Author Affiliation
Department of Community and Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. david.savitz@mssm.edu
Source
Mt Sinai J Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;75(2):77-87
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Disaster planning
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects
New York City - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupational Health
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Population Surveillance
Program Evaluation
Public Health
Relief Work
September 11 Terrorist Attacks
Voluntary Workers
Abstract
Studies of long-term health consequences of disasters face unique methodologic challenges. The authors focused on studies of the health of cleanup and recovery workers, who are often poorly enumerated at the outset and difficult to follow over time. Comparison of the experience at the World Trade Center disaster with 4 past incidents of chemical and radiation releases at Seveso, Italy; Bhopal, India; Chernobyl, Ukraine; and Three Mile Island, USA, provided useful contrasts. Each event had methodologic advantages and disadvantages that depended on the nature of the disaster and the availability of records on area residents, and the emergency-response and cleanup protocol. The World Trade Center Worker Monitoring Program has well-defined eligibility criteria but lacks information on the universe of eligible workers to characterize response proportions or the potential for distortion of reported health effects. Nonparticipation may result from lack of interest, lack of awareness of the program, availability of another source of medical care, medical conditions precluding participation, inability to take time off from work, moving out of the area, death, or shift from initially ineligible to eligible status. Some of these considerations suggest selective participation by the sickest individuals, whereas others favor participation by the healthiest. The greatest concern with the validity of inferences regarding elevated health risks relative to external populations is the potential for selective enrollment among those who are affected. If there were a large pool of nonparticipating workers and those who suffered ill health were most motivated to enroll, the rates of disease among participants would be substantially higher than among all those eligible for the program. Future disaster follow-up studies would benefit substantially by having access to accurate estimates of the number of workers and information on the individuals who contributed to the cleanup and recovery effort.
PubMed ID
18500709 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a defibrillator-basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation programme for non medical personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53596
Source
Resuscitation. 2003 Feb;56(2):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Lars Wik
Elizabeth Dorph
Bjørn Auestad
Petter Andreas Steen
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medical Services, Division of Surgery, Ulleval University Hospital, N-0407 Oslo, Norway. lars@nakos.org
Source
Resuscitation. 2003 Feb;56(2):167-72
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - education - methods
Comparative Study
Educational Measurement
Electric Countershock
Female
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Male
Manikins
Norway
Probability
Professional Competence
Program Development
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Ventricular Fibrillation - therapy
Voluntary Workers
Abstract
To improve the outcome for out-of-hospital patients with ventricular fibrillation/pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT), the use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) by first responders including non-medical personnel with a duty to respond to an emergency is recommended. A special CPR-AED course has been developed. We wanted to test the results (quality and speed of operating an AED and CPR) after completion of such a course and retention after approximately 1-year. At the same time we wanted to see if personnel could use an AED after receiving written information without having attended the course. Study subjects were divided randomly into groups, and tested pre-course (n=54), post-course (n=50), and unannounced 10+/-3 months after the course (retention group, n=61). For statistical analysis two sample tests for binomial proportions and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test was used as appropriate. Fifteen of the 27 pairs (56%) in the pre-course group with no previous exposure to an AED decided to use it. There was no difference between the groups in electrode pad positioning, and all stayed clear of the manikin during the process of AED charging and shock delivery. The post-course group had a higher rate of checking for responsiveness (vs. pre-course), not to check for a pulse (vs. both other groups), the shortest time interval from arrival on scene to start of CPR and shock delivery, and in parallel the shortest hands-off interval (without chest compressions and ventilations) before shock delivery. The quality of chest compressions was improved by the course but decreased to a similar standard as in the pre-course when tested 10+/-3 months later, except for correct depth which was similar to post course. Most ventilation attempts in all groups were scored as incorrect due to the high incidence of excessively rapid inflations. The retention group had a lower frequency of correct inflations than the pre-course group, and the post-course group the highest number of correct ventilations per minute. These findings suggest that use of an AED by untrained laypersons may be feasible and that complex and time-consuming training programmes may not be necessary. The present study also supports the need for annual training and recertification.
PubMed ID
12589990 View in PubMed
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[Gun works at Noah's Ark. There are no stupid questions about AIDS--only stupid answers. Interview by Elisabet Forslind.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8392
Source
Vardfacket. 1990 Feb 22;14(4):26-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-1990

Health promotion profile of youth sports clubs in Finland: club officials' and coaches' perceptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90493
Source
Health Promot Int. 2009 Mar;24(1):26-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Kokko Sami
Kannas Lasse
Villberg Jari
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Health Promotion, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä FIN-40014, Jyväskylä, Finland. sami.p.kokko@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Health Promot Int. 2009 Mar;24(1):26-35
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Certification
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Culture
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Fitness Centers - organization & administration - standards
Health Promotion - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Education and Training - organization & administration - standards
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Sports - classification - standards
Teaching - classification - standards
Voluntary Workers
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to examine the current health promotion orientation of youth sports clubs in Finland in view of the standards created previously for the health promoting sports club (HPSC). Ninety-seven youth sports clubs participated, and 273 sports club officials and 240 coaches answered the questionnaires. To describe clubs health promotion orientations, an HPSC index was created. The HPSC index was formulated on sub-indices by factor analysis. The sub-indices were: policy, ideology, practice and environment indexes. The results indicate that youth sports clubs are fairly health promoting in general. On average, the clubs fulfilled 12 standards for HPSC out of 22. Every fourth club was categorized as higher health promoting (> or = 15 fulfilled standards), and every third as lower health promoting (
PubMed ID
19136676 View in PubMed
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Joining two social institutions to counter rural Alaskan child abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5120
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 1985;9(3):383-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
G W Brown
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 1985;9(3):383-8
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control
Child Rearing
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Delivery of Health Care
Female
Humans
Male
Medically underserved area
Risk
Rural Health
Social Support
Social Values
Social Work
Voluntary Workers
Abstract
Change in social customs and institutions is usually a slow process. This seems particularly true in attitudes about child abuse. Two key elements for change are being utilized for child protection in a rural area of Alaska with a predominantly Caucasian population. First, application of an old church custom of "constructive gossip" by volunteers is changing this rural community attitude about children. Second, use of an innovative federal government health care delivery program has established this community's first obstetric and pediatric service. With the oil boom in Alaska, widespread family disruption with frequent child abuse and neglect has become commonplace. Despite the oil tax wealth, State of Alaska Child Protection Services are strained to keep up with family and community violence. Deliberate cooperation with local community, church and service organization leaders is helping keep up with child protection needs. The obstetric and pediatric specialists of the National Health Service Corps non-profit practice were co-leaders, along with community leaders, in starting a lay volunteer service called "Friends of Families." Working cooperatively with the state child protection office, 24 families have received assistance from parent aides of Friends of Families. The influence of these two key elements of change on rural community attitudes and institutions are described.
PubMed ID
4052845 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.